Question What objectively happens to your overheated CPU?

Fire-Wire

Commendable
Jul 13, 2017
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I didn't find any posts with the exact information I'm seeking, so here it is:

Imagine a very hot-running cpu (a 7700k, for example) - it only runs at 95ºC all the time its on load, always, never less, never more. What objectively happens to your CPU both short and long term? The answer may involve other hardware/components and general performance.

P.s: please don't say it depends and showcase millions of different nitpicked scenarios, just imagine one where all is standard and go with it.
 
I didn't find any posts with the exact information I'm seeking, so here it is:

Imagine a very hot-running cpu (a 7700k, for example) - it only runs at 95ºC all the time its on load, always, never less, never more. What objectively happens to your CPU both short and long term? The answer may involve other hardware/components and general performance.

P.s: please don't say it depends and showcase millions of different nitpicked scenarios, just imagine one where all is standard and go with it.
Heat shorten the life of components.
A hot CPU will lower clocks (underperform/throttling) to maintain a stable temperature.
It will shorten the life of the CPU.
Heat from the CPU will raise temperatures of other components like the motherboard, causing shutdowns and also shorten its life span.
Another component that can suffer: The GPU.
RAM could give out errors and their IC chip could die.
Noise, fans will ramp-up trying to dissipate heat, which will shorten their life span.
Heat could cause disks to slow down or fail or both.
 
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Mr.Spock

Prominent
Dec 8, 2019
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95'C isn't overheated, Tj is listed as 100'C - so it's still nominal - most newer processors will simply throttle or bluescreen before serious damage.

I didn't find any posts with the exact information I'm seeking, so here it is:

Imagine a very hot-running cpu (a 7700k, for example) - it only runs at 95ºC all the time its on load, always, never less, never more. What objectively happens to your CPU both short and long term? The answer may involve other hardware/components and general performance.

P.s: please don't say it depends and showcase millions of different nitpicked scenarios, just imagine one where all is standard and go with it.
 

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