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Question What of these coolers for 10700k?

leank1

Reputable
Dec 4, 2015
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Hey people!

Im waiting 10700k to arrive.

And for cooling im between this two coolers:

*Bequiet Dark Rock Slim
*NZXT Kraken X42 v2


Im not going to overclock, atleast for now.
Going to run at stock clock without tweaking bios settings (all default)


Who of this two options will be the best?

If u ask why i get 10700k instead 10700, is because i get 10700k cheaper than non K

Thanks in advance!
 

Karadjgne

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Neither. The 10700k is a 8c/16t cpu capable of more wattage output than either of those 2 coolers can compensate for.

The Core i7-10700K proved to be fairly easy to cool with a Corsair H115i 280mm AIO cooler. The chip peaked at 85C during a string of y-cruncher multi-threaded tests, and power peaked at slightly over 250W. That's a new high for Core i7, but you could get away with bulky air coolers if you reign in your maximum frequency targets.
The Darkrock slim is closer to 140w, the kraken X42 is @ 200w, so if that was my only choice, the kraken would be an easy clear winner.

For all intents and purposes the 10700k is the same as a i9-9900k, except it's tweaked to perform a little better, cheaper. Power targets are almost identical, the only reason it's moved upto 125w TDP is the 3.8GHz base clock vs the 9900k 3.6GHz.

Stock configuration will be fine on the kraken, but even a locked full core turbo will show brutal temps, even if otherwise stock.

Honestly, if any OC whatsoever is any kind of consideration, I'd advise going big now, not wasting money on smaller coolers that'll by necessity be replaced.
 
Reactions: Unolocogringo

Wayne-O

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Nov 14, 2013
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I was thinking about using my old Silent Square for air cooling the i7-10700 I just got....
http://www.madshrimps.be/articles/article/502/Asus-Silent-Square-CPU-Cooler-Review#axzz6S2TMmBYv
I would be replacing the fan (again) prior to installing.. Do you think this would work for non-overclocked? Stock cooler supplied with CPU looks much less capable.

It seems at least as good as the "recommended" Noctua air cooler
https://www.anandtech.com/show/14621/the-noctua-nhu12a-cpu-cooler-review

I would appreciate opinions!

Wayne-O
 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
I was thinking about using my old Silent Square for air cooling the i7-10700 I just got....
http://www.madshrimps.be/articles/article/502/Asus-Silent-Square-CPU-Cooler-Review#axzz6S2TMmBYv
I would be replacing the fan (again) prior to installing.. Do you think this would work for non-overclocked? Stock cooler supplied with CPU looks much less capable.
I'm glad I held onto this:
View: https://imgur.com/YwqWtBb


That's a big NEGATIVE. The Silent Square is just rated for 130w.

It seems at least as good as the "recommended" Noctua air cooler
https://www.anandtech.com/show/14621/the-noctua-nhu12a-cpu-cooler-review
Negative. The NH-U12A is in a league of its own; it can rival the performance of the larger D15 coolers.
 

Karadjgne

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Look at the top right hand corner of the box. Kinda a dead giveaway that it's not going to happen. "Ultra silent for DUAL core cpu overclocking". On a 8 core/ 16 thread cpu.....

That's like putting the carburetor from a gas powered weed-eater on a 600HP Corvette engine, it'll work right?

From the chart above, P2 is the wattage output at max turbo, tau is the duration of that turbo, as specified by Intel. Do not assume that vendors stick to the rules, only Asus does. Gigabyte and MSI both have thrown Intel specs out the window and re-written the bios to drop that 28second max turbo to 99999 seconds, or basically infinite turbo length. Take it for granted turbo speeds and wattage will be hitting above 200w during heavy gaming sessions. That diminutive 92mm 'Silent Square' is seriously outmatched.

TDP is an average power output of a series of standardized applications taken at base speeds of cores only. No turbo, no hyperthreading, no boosts or tweeks.

The 10700/k is a 125w TDP cpu. So if you chopped the cpu performance by disable turbo, disable hyperthreading, that 130w 'Silent Square' would resemble a better sounding stock cooler. Run the 10700/k at factory defaults, which is turbo/hyperthreading enabled, you'll not be so lucky.

Figure it this way. You just spent a lot of money for a Monster cpu. It's going to REQUIRE Monster cooling. You will NOT get away with using a Powder Puff cooler, just because it's cheap.
 

Wayne-O

Honorable
Nov 14, 2013
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10,510
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Thanks Phaaze88 ; I had never seen the PL2 numbers before and wondered about the 125W which seemed really low for TDP even. Then the stock cooler (which I did not know it came with) was so small. Around 1/5 the size of the Silent Square. Note I did not get the overclockable "K" version. ($60 less)

How does it get to "turbo boost" using stock cooler? Which I may use for a month or two now....
 

Karadjgne

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Turbo is a function of bios. It's enabled by default for any cpu that can boost above the base clocks. But it's not a full core boost. You'll see maximum boost for upto 28 seconds (Tau) on 1-2 cores, and then it starts to drop off.

A good read:
https://www.techpowerup.com/review/intel-core-i7-10700/22.html

If you intend to follow up on that, you'll need some muscle for a cooler as you'll possibly be hitting the 224w PL2 a lot easier, and a lot more often.
 

Karadjgne

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They are basing it on the thought that turbo won't last long. With the new way of doing things, turbo is supposed to be no longer infinite setting. You get only 2-3 seconds of max, then upto 28 seconds (or 56 for the K) for a chopped turbo, then down to base speeds per application. So if you run a constant app like Prime95, you'll spend most of the test at very low clock speeds, only the opening will be at max turbo, otherwise it drops back to PL1 after the PL2 duration. PL1 being a 65w power limit for the cpu, so final boost speeds will be determined by in use core count.

Not gonna work out so well on MSI or Gigabyte Z motherboards as their bios is proprietary and set for extended duration turbo of 99999 seconds instead of 28, and power limits of PL2 are 4064w I believe. Only Asus follows Intel guidelines.

Games are a little different. All their files are pretty tiny, and there's plenty of stuff starting/stopping, so turbo will run, reset, run, reset constantly. So you'll spend a lot of time in the first 3 second or so area for sure, especially in fast, first person type shooters, but not so much in the long, strategy type games.

Either way, the stock cooler is totally inadequate for running games, only barely passable for secretarial type office functions.
 
Just to add as I have the 10700K, the design on the cooling front has been improved with a new tim and shaved thinner die design which actually does make it run cooler. Saying that, I would go the 240mm AIO route at the very least if you can as at stock it will do more than a good job and then when you are ready to push for an overclock, it will allow for more headroom. 240mm AIO's have really dropped in price and pretty much all are within fractions of each other so just pick the most cost effective one.
 

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