Question What should my subwoofer crossover be set to?

Flores Valdez

Commendable
Feb 27, 2019
9
0
1,510
0
Hello, I use a 2.1 system with the Denon RCD-N9. I was wondering what crossover my subwoofer should be set to, since I can't change it on the reciever. I use the Dali Zensor 1's with a 10 inch subwoofer. Thanks
 

BogdanH

Prominent
Sep 21, 2020
579
200
790
22
The way (audio equipment) manufacturers publish specifications nowaday, it's just impossible to know. What you need is power output frequency response curve, so you could at least know where to start. I mean something like "60Hz-20kHZ -3dB both channels driven at 40W".
Saying Rated output: 65W+65W (4ohms, 1kHz, THD+N 0.7%) tells absolutely nothing and is actually deceiving info, giving the impression amplifier actually has such audio power. So much about amplifier part.

Ok, Dali is a bit better with specs and so setting crossover freq at about 50Hz (that's where -3dB cutoff is) seems to be a good start -assuming Dali loudspeakers and subwoofer have similar sensitivity. And even if they have, that is no guarantee.. because you don't know how amplifier behaves at 50Hz -how much power it can deliver to Dali's at this frequency.
In short: the only way to set crossover frequency is "by ear" (until you like the sound).
 
Reactions: punkncat
I agree with going by ear as well. The placement of the Dali to produce the best Stereo sound probably isn't the ideal place for bass response. You may well have to correct crossover to provide for placement of the main pair. Other aspects that matter are the furnishings and finish of the room. Carpet, drapes, couch all deaden sound where a hardwood floor area with little (soft) furniture will be bright.
 
Reactions: BogdanH

BogdanH

Prominent
Sep 21, 2020
579
200
790
22
Yes, agree.. but seriously, it's not worth the effort (read: costs) for average music lover. Reality is, even "linear" response is what we look for, most of us will adjust "sound" to our taste afterwards (depending on mood, type of music and loudness).

Most recent A/V Receivers have "calibration" tool built in and "mini" microphone included, which works quite well from my experience. Yes, is no at "pro" tool, but good enough to start with. Again, I'm having an average home use in mind.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Yes, agree.. but seriously, it's not worth the effort (read: costs) for average music lover. Reality is, even "linear" response is what we look for, most of us will adjust "sound" to our taste afterwards (depending on mood, type of music and loudness).

Most recent A/V Receivers have "calibration" tool built in and "mini" microphone included, which works quite well from my experience. Yes, is no at "pro" tool, but good enough to start with. Again, I'm having an average home use in mind.
Sure. But trying to introduce someone to more advanced topics is never a bad thing. They may not utilize it now, but when they have a new home theater, they may go "what was that about 'room calibration' ? " ...
It also helps explain why crossover settings are important.
 
Reactions: BogdanH

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS