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[SOLVED] What test you perform to check new builds components?

Toni Vicente

Honorable
Oct 13, 2013
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I'm waiting for my new MB, GPU, CPU, PSU, memory from Amazon.es, At this moment all components arrive in different shipments, PSU, GPU out stock until June, so I was thinking that I won't be able to test my pieces within 30 days from receipt.

This has made me think about what tests are currently used after mounting the system.
There are a forum topic of the year 2013.
Focusing in the topic...
What test you perform to check new builds components?
What software you use to test all components? apart of temp, what you see to check hardware? (cpu cores working, memory banks, right speeds...)

Thanks!
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Everyone has preferences, so there's no right answer. The above is just a sampling.

As such, even these guys have gotten used to certain things, like Prime95 small fft for its accuracy with temps and loads, and that comes from years back when it was also used for stability. It no longer works for that as pc's are different now.

But if you use the programs ppl are familiar with, you'll stand a better chance of having more people possibly understand and and answer.

Many like Aida64's versatility, I personally don't. Hwmonitor is very popular, and used to be quite good, not any more but it's web popularity hasn't waned even though it's semi-useless and very often inaccurate especially for Ryzen. HWInfo64 (sensors only) is far superior and is very accurate for Ryzens, as is Ryzen Master.

The 'pros' use certain programs because the answers tell them everything they need to know. A Prime95 temp of 60°C tells them the cooling is doing a terrific job, there's no issue there, can be ignored as a cause for whatever issue op has.

But yes, it's good to run a monitoring software like Coretemp or Realtemp or Ryzen Master or MSI Afterburner during load tests because they actually give you the temps, the fan speeds, the usage etc as the load is working. Kinda defeats the purpose if you can't see what's happening when the test is running.
 
Reactions: Toni Vicente

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Prime95 small fft with AVX technology disabled for temps.
Asus RealBench for stability.
3dMark Firestrike for gpu.
Monitoring software varies from MSI Afterburner to Ryzen Master, Coretemp, Realtemp, Aida64 etc

But the simplest is just turn on the pc and look in bios to set ram, then try and boot windows. If you get that far, you've obviously done something right.
 
Reactions: thomas4204 and Zeky

Toni Vicente

Honorable
Oct 13, 2013
78
1
10,635
0
Monitoring software is used join with the others test? These test are safe or I must take care with something?
Here aren't more answers, so I guess all experts use these programs. :D
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Everyone has preferences, so there's no right answer. The above is just a sampling.

As such, even these guys have gotten used to certain things, like Prime95 small fft for its accuracy with temps and loads, and that comes from years back when it was also used for stability. It no longer works for that as pc's are different now.

But if you use the programs ppl are familiar with, you'll stand a better chance of having more people possibly understand and and answer.

Many like Aida64's versatility, I personally don't. Hwmonitor is very popular, and used to be quite good, not any more but it's web popularity hasn't waned even though it's semi-useless and very often inaccurate especially for Ryzen. HWInfo64 (sensors only) is far superior and is very accurate for Ryzens, as is Ryzen Master.

The 'pros' use certain programs because the answers tell them everything they need to know. A Prime95 temp of 60°C tells them the cooling is doing a terrific job, there's no issue there, can be ignored as a cause for whatever issue op has.

But yes, it's good to run a monitoring software like Coretemp or Realtemp or Ryzen Master or MSI Afterburner during load tests because they actually give you the temps, the fan speeds, the usage etc as the load is working. Kinda defeats the purpose if you can't see what's happening when the test is running.
 
Reactions: Toni Vicente

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