Question What to do with K10 Tesla in video editing PC

Feb 18, 2019
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I posted this question on the systems forum a few days ago, but I think maybe it is better suited for here.

I have just taken over a build of a PC for video editing and Graphic Creation. The previous "builder" purchased an NVidia K10 Tesla GPU and an 800 Watt Power Supply, and had an older Alienware box.

I am tasked with speccing and securing the components to make this a fast video editing machine. I'm thinking of a Core i7 8700K, 16GB DDR 4 3000, and a Samsung M.2 500 GB.
I will also have to add a video card, since they want dual monitor support. They're planning to use Adobe Creative Cloud.

My question is... What to do with the K10? It is passively cooled, so there's a problem from the get-go with airflow, and does it just work to help process and render, while actual video output goes through the 2nd video card - or is this card essentially useless in this system?

I've built hundreds of systems down through the years, but have never seen one of these cards, much less worked with one before, so I'm a bit lost.

Anybody out there who can advise me so I can properly spec this build?
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
K10 video cards are intended to virtualize GPUs in a VM environment. NVIDIA only certified a limited number of server chassis to support the passive K10s.
I think without a 2U form factor system with high airflow, you will have problems.

The K10 has two GPUs on one card. Since it has two GPUs, each one only has 4GB VRAM. Here is one of the few threads I could find on using a K10 for rendering -- https://render.otoy.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=44960
 
Feb 18, 2019
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Yes, I have my concerns about airflow... and I haven't really been able to determine the functionality for the intended purpose. This is what happens when someone tries to build their own system without knowledge of what they're doing. From what I've been able to gather, they spent a ridiculous amount of money on a card that is most likely useless in this configuration.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
If you followed the links, the one post equates it to a GTX690. This page does blender benchmark comparison -- http://blenchmark.com/gpu-benchmarks A single 690 is approximately two 680s. So peformance will be similar to two 1050ti cards. Not terribly impressive. It is a six year old card. My bet is that somebody bought it for cheap thinking they were getting a super card without understanding anything about it.
 
Feb 18, 2019
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If you followed the links, the one post equates it to a GTX690. This page does blender benchmark comparison -- http://blenchmark.com/gpu-benchmarks A single 690 is approximately two 680s. So peformance will be similar to two 1050ti cards. Not terribly impressive. It is a six year old card. My bet is that somebody bought it for cheap thinking they were getting a super card without understanding anything about it.
Thanks for your response and the link.

You might well be correct in that bet - although the customer told me that they spent big bucks on it a couple years ago and then never completed the build.

So, I'm thinking that I recommend scrapping that plan... My experience is more in business machines and base general consumer models, and a few gaming systems builds, which were specced to me by the customer, so I admit a little weakness in the GPU knowledge department.

What card would you recommend I spec? For the pricepoint he's wanting to be in, I'm thinking a GPU in the $200 range... I can get the 1050ti for @ $150, RX 580, which benchmarks faster, @ $180, or do I need to spec higher? Any suggestions? (bearing in mind that video rendering will be the primary purpose - NO gaming planned...)
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
To determine which graphics card, you need to verify which software packages will be used. Many are optimized for CUDA which is only supported on NVIDIA cards. Start by verifying the software suite and then check the support CUDA, Open CL, or CPU only. Those are the things that need to be evaluated for a video build.
Then RAM and storage. A CPU with more memory channels will usually be better for a video editing build. An X299 motherboard with an i7-9800X would be my recommendation but the costs are higher. You get more cores, for CPU rendering. You get more PCIe lanes, for multiple GPUs, and more memory channels for higher bandwidth, etc. Those are the kinds of things that improve video rendering etc. BUT the cost goes up. It all depends on budget.
 
Feb 18, 2019
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To determine which graphics card, you need to verify which software packages will be used. Many are optimized for CUDA which is only supported on NVIDIA cards. Start by verifying the software suite and then check the support CUDA, Open CL, or CPU only. Those are the things that need to be evaluated for a video build.
Then RAM and storage. A CPU with more memory channels will usually be better for a video editing build. An X299 motherboard with an i7-9800X would be my recommendation but the costs are higher. You get more cores, for CPU rendering. You get more PCIe lanes, for multiple GPUs, and more memory channels for higher bandwidth, etc. Those are the kinds of things that improve video rendering etc. BUT the cost goes up. It all depends on budget.
He's using Adobe Creative Cloud. That much I know.

Current budget (BEFORE GPU CHANGES) is in the $1200 range for motherboard, CPU, RAM and M.2. I can get a bump, but probably not enough to go full-on bleeding edge.

Honestly, I don't know where his top end is.

From what I was reading, it appears to me that the 9th generation Core i7's are a step down from 8th generation because they remove hyper-threading capability from the i7 and cut back the available cache, trying to push the core i9's. That's why I was spec'ing the i7-8700K. Am I wrong in that?

Don't want to seem stupid, but the X299/ 9th gen is moving out of my knowledge/experience wheelhouse. My default has usually been to spec up to and just under the big price jump, and I have built machines with the 8th gen. That's because, to me, cutting edge usually means higher cost / lower value. Maybe this is a case where that's not true.

The X299 board is only @ $100 more than the board I was planning to use, but as I'm looking, now I see that the X299 is a different socket as well... I had spec'd a z390 with the 8700K - LGA 1151. My local parts supplier doesn't even have the 9th gen core i7, only the i9's and the cheapest LGA 2066 comes in at $899, and that's definitely out of the budget!
 
Feb 18, 2019
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With your price range you, 32GB RAM (2x16GB), CPU, MB, M.2 and cooler will eat your $1200 ...
Yes... I had spec'ed 16 GB (2X8) DDR4 3000, Core i7-8700K (3.7 GHz), Asus Prime Z-390A, Crucial P1 500 GB M.2 and Cooler Master Hyper 212 CPU Cooler (and Windows 10) to come in "in that ballpark". I haven't set a firm price yet, as I told him that I would have to research the GPU to decide where to go from here. I'm in the process of trying to set a firm quote to send him now, which is why I'm crash-course learning off of you ;<)
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Yes... I had spec'ed 16 GB (2X8) DDR4 3000, Core i7-8700K (3.7 GHz), Asus Prime Z-390A, Crucial P1 500 GB M.2 and Cooler Master Hyper 212 CPU Cooler (and Windows 10) to come in "in that ballpark". I haven't set a firm price yet, as I told him that I would have to research the GPU to decide where to go from here. I'm in the process of trying to set a firm quote to send him now, which is why I'm crash-course learning off of you ;<)
For video, I would highly recommend 32GB. I would also recommend one of these SSDs -- https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820326778
Get a Noctua or DarkRock cooler. The 212 is OK because it is cheap, but there are many better coolers.
 

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