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Question What to test when mouse, keyboard and monitor turn off?

Nov 15, 2013
18
0
10,510
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Hello, I am looking for a checklist of what I need to test on my rig after experiencing the mouse, keyboard and monitor turning off and the computer remains powered on other wise. I am forced to perform a PSU turn off as power buttons on case are unresponsive. I have tested and passed RAM with memtest86, I have also tested the HDD (chkdsk). Other than the last resort, buying a new PSU, what should I be testing? Currently on Corsair RM750 less than a year old also.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
What are the OTHER hardware specifications. Motherboard, CPU, etc.?

Are you using a power strip to plug the PSU into?

Are you using a UPS battery backup system?

What OS and OS version are you running?

Does it shut these things off if you are outside of Windows, like for example, in the BIOS, or does it ONLY do it when you are in Windows? Have you tried downloading and running a bootable Linux distro on a flash drive to see if the problem occurs there as well?
 
Nov 15, 2013
18
0
10,510
0
Responses in Green

What are the OTHER hardware specifications. Motherboard, CPU, etc.?
Asus ROG Strix B450-F, Ryzen 7 1700, Corsair Vengeance LPX (2 X 8GB), Radeon RX Vega 56
Are you using a power strip to plug the PSU into?
Surge protector
Are you using a UPS battery backup system?
No
What OS and OS version are you running?
Windows 10 1909
Does it shut these things off if you are outside of Windows, like for example, in the BIOS, or does it ONLY do it when you are in Windows? Have you tried downloading and running a bootable Linux distro on a flash drive to see if the problem occurs there as well?
Only happening when in windows, also when gaming

Should also mention checked event history and didn't see anything other than Origin web service helper failing around time of unexpected shutdown so uninstalled that.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Did you just build this system and are having this problem from day one, or did you build this a while back and it was working fine but just started doing this recently?

Have you installed the latest AMD chipset drivers from the AMD website for the B450 chipset?

Have you installed the motherboard specific drivers from the motherboard product page for the network adapter (LAN/Ethernet), Audio controller and any required USB drivers?
 
Nov 15, 2013
18
0
10,510
0
Did you just build this system and are having this problem from day one, or did you build this a while back and it was working fine but just started doing this recently?
Upgraded and installed new motherboard, RAM, CPU in 2018. Had an issue with that mboard, bought new and installed with new PSU and GPU 9 months ago. Have started having shutoff and issue described above recently more often though it did occur one time a couple months ago.
Have you installed the latest AMD chipset drivers from the AMD website for the B450 chipset?
No
Have you installed the motherboard specific drivers from the motherboard product page for the network adapter (LAN/Ethernet), Audio controller and any required USB drivers?
No, I am running on the default drivers for the mboard as a lot of people warned updating drivers could cause new issues.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I am running on the default drivers for the mboard as a lot of people warned updating drivers could cause new issues.[/COLOR]
This, is complete nonsense. Whoever told you that, put them on the list of people you are not going to ever listen to again, and then don't listen to them again. LOL.

If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



The last thing we want to look at,

for now anyhow, is the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.

 
Nov 15, 2013
18
0
10,510
0
Thanks for the help on this. I've completed all of the above steps including going to AMD using their Chipset and RAID drivers. If I have any shut off issues arise, I'll post back in here. Hope you are safe and healthy btw.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Why do you have RAID drivers installed? Are you running a RAID array? If not, you shouldn't be running those. All you should need are the AHCI drivers that are part of the chipset drivers or Windows.

Power strip wouldn't have anything to do with ONLY the keyboard, mouse and monitor shutting off, unless the keyboard and mouse were plugged into USB outlets on the monitor and the power strip was losing power to the monitor.
 
Nov 15, 2013
18
0
10,510
0
Hello, I had the issue again after applying all the above steps? What else should I be looking at?

Noticed this in event viewer: The AMDRyzenMasterDriver service failed to start due to the following error:
The system cannot find the path specified.
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Try reinstalling Ryzen master.

Please list ALL your storage devices, especially the one your OS is installed on and how long it has been in service.

Please list your EXACT PSU model and how long that has been in service, and whether you had any of these problems prior to installing that power supply?
 
Nov 15, 2013
18
0
10,510
0
Try reinstalling Ryzen master.

Please list ALL your storage devices, especially the one your OS is installed on and how long it has been in service.

Please list your EXACT PSU model and how long that has been in service, and whether you had any of these problems prior to installing that power supply?
Thing is I never had Ryzen master installed as an app on the PC. I installed the program but just to hopefully circumvent not finding the file.

I have Corsair RM750 power supply. The storage is Western Digital Blue 2 TB 72000RPM 64MB cache. I unfortunately don't know when I bought the HDD but its probably around 2 years ago.

I did not have any of these problems prior to replacing the motherboard back the first time. After replacing that board with a new one it fixed a majority of some of the freezes I saw. But then they started happening when gaming over the past year so I did a clean install of Windows after formatting the HDD and that took care of it until recently now where the issue is happening that I described of mouse, keyboard, screen just freezing and turning off.
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



The last thing we want to look at,

for now anyhow, is the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.



Also, if this is a "no signal detected" or other lack of visual display problem, it is probably a good idea to make sure the problem is not just a bad cable or the wrong cable IF this is a display issue. If it is NOT related to a lack of display signal, then obviously this part is not relevant to your issue.

This happens a lot. Try a different cable or a different TYPE of cable. Sometimes there can be issues with the monitor or card not supporting a specific specification such as HDMI 1.4 vs HDMI 2.0, or even an HDMI output stops working but the Displayport or DVI output still works fine on the graphics card. Always worth checking the cable and trying other cables because cables get run over, bent, bent pins or simply were cheap quality to begin with and something as simple as trying a different cable or different monitor might be all that is required to solve your issue.
 

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