News What We Know About Windows 11 SE

Apr 1, 2020
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"It will run on low-end hardware usually present on school laptops"

I'd like to see how they are able to trim down the big bloat of the Windows kernel to run DECENTLY on a friggen CELERON N4120.

Sorry, education laptops (targeted at the K-12 market) just need to run Office and browse the internet, they don't need x86 compatibility, and for that compatibility you have to sacrifice a lot in that price area.
 
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Sorry, education laptops (targeted at the K-12 market) just need to run Office and browse the internet, they don't need x86 compatibility, and for that compatibility you have to sacrifice a lot in that price area.
As a whole, that's a fact. However it also depends on the student and applications. My 14 year old nephew in middle school has signed up for a media club where they create and edit videos. He wants to get into online streaming video production. A basic Chromebook will not run their required Adobe Premiere Pro for video editing, so his parents had to buy him a decent desktop replacement laptop.

I'd also like to know how MS is going to handle the "NO INTEL CPUs OLDER THAN GEN 8 FOR WINDOWS 11!!!!" mandate when many schools out there, especially of lower income/taxpayer areas, are getting donations graced from old refurbs by corporations. The company I used work for as an example has donated hundreds of HP EliteDesk i5 6th generation based micro desktops to schools and small colleges. And yes, I know there's a manual option to turn on TPM with 7th-gen Intel chips.

So are we going to see Microsoft's draconian TPM 2.0 rule be waved for Windows 11 SE? I can't wait to see how this plays out as I have older Intel chipset hardware starting with one referenced in my hardware sig (gee I've never been hacked going all the way back to the Pentium II days online - then again I've always run AV/security software and not been stupid in clicking something I don't recognize). All that said, I started building computers around the time the last "SE" tag was on a Windows version, Windows 98 SE - not a cut down version of it either.
 
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Apr 1, 2020
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As a whole, that's a fact. However it also depends on the student and applications. My 14 year old nephew in middle school has signed up for a media club where they create and edit videos. He wants to get into online streaming video production. A basic Chromebook will not run their required Adobe Premiere Pro for video editing, so his parents had to buy him a decent desktop replacement laptop.
But how well do you think Adobe Premiere Pro would run on a 6w 14nm Celeron N4120 with a 1.1ghz base and 2.6ghz "burst" frequency? Not well.
 

USAFRet

Titan
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But how well do you think Adobe Premiere Pro would run on a 6w 14nm Celeron N4120 with a 1.1ghz base and 2.6ghz "burst" frequency? Not well.
What does Premier Pro have to do with anything?
Similarly, I wouldn't run AutoCad on such a system, or manage a billion row SQL database.

I have a little Asus Transformer. Atom N8350 processor, 4GB RAM.
It does what it needs to do. Runs Word, Excel, Chrome or FF, movies via VLC...

Not every system needs to be an uber box that can run everything on the planet.
 
Apr 1, 2020
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What does Premier Pro have to do with anything?
Similarly, I wouldn't run AutoCad on such a system, or manage a billion row SQL database.

I have a little Asus Transformer. Atom N8350 processor, 4GB RAM.
It does what it needs to do. Runs Word, Excel, Chrome or FF, movies via VLC...

Not every system needs to be an uber box that can run everything on the planet.
Read 10tacle's post.
 
Apr 1, 2020
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Yes, I did.

And Premier Pro, or any other large application is not suited for a low end system. Or a Chromebook.
That does not mean low end systems are useless.
Which is why in my first post I stated:

Sorry, education laptops (targeted at the K-12 market) just need to run Office and browse the internet, they don't need x86 compatibility, and for that compatibility you have to sacrifice a lot in that price area.
10tacle brought up Adobe Premiere Pro not running on a Chromebook, therefore requiring x86 compatibility and a desktop quality laptop, in the second post, and I referenced Microsoft's upcoming flagship Windows 11 SE Surface product featuring a very slow Celeron processor in the third post to bring home the point that the Windows 11 SE market doesn't exist as the Windows kernel and x86 applications, aside from basic office programs, and even those have become very resource intensive, especially on the HDD, are far too heavy to run effectively on the very low end hardware that Microsoft is targeting with Windows 11 SE in the likely $400 area market. We run into the same problem as when OEMs put Vista on computers barely able to run XP.

And when they can pay a quarter to half as much for a Chromebook, or even an Android tablet with a keyboard case or bluetooth keyboard, and use Google office programs (or Microsoft Office if they ever make a compatible version) which accomplishes the same task, what's the selling point in the Windows 11SE sub $400 market outside schools which must use specific x86 programs, especially when you consider that there will be multiple models with varying capacities of RAM and storage space? Remember as it will be educational institutions buying these, not the general public, cost is an incredibly important factor.

And as an owner of a Surface Pro 3 with the i7-4650u, which effectively has the same performance as the N4120 per Passmark, it's painfully slow, even with Office 365 tasks even with a much faster storage system than the Windows 11 SE Surface product will have.
 
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USAFRet

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And I'm still a bit befuddled as to the statement of Premier Pro won't run on a low end device.
We know and expect that. So what?

Low end Chromebooks have their place.
Low end Windows systems have their place.

My 3 year old Transformer runs Word/Excel 2019 just fine.
I wouldn't write a 400 page novel on it, or open one of the big spreadsheets from work.
But for small stuff, its OK.
 

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