what will kill my laptop first?

G

Guest

Guest
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Would it be more damaging to leave it on 24/7 or to use the power on
once per day?
TIA
 
G

Guest

Guest
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Leaving it running 27/7 is more harmful - notebooks aren't designed to
run continuously and the heat will eventually kill one or more
components (mainboard, hard drive).


yodasue@webtv.net wrote:
> Would it be more damaging to leave it on 24/7 or to use the power on
> once per day?
> TIA
>
 
G

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I've heard the new Notebooks' generation has a far better cooling system and
can be used as much as a desktop.
Do you thing it's true?


Edward J. Neth wrote:
> Leaving it running 27/7 is more harmful - notebooks aren't designed to
> run continuously and the heat will eventually kill one or more
> components (mainboard, hard drive).
>
>
> yodasue@webtv.net wrote:
>> Would it be more damaging to leave it on 24/7 or to use the power on
>> once per day?
>> TIA
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I've heard the new Notebooks' generation has a far better cooling
system and can be used as much as a desktop.
Do you think it's true?


> Edward J. Neth wrote:
>> Leaving it running 27/7 is more harmful - notebooks aren't designed
>> to run continuously and the heat will eventually kill one or more
>> components (mainboard, hard drive).
>>
>>
>> yodasue@webtv.net wrote:
>>> Would it be more damaging to leave it on 24/7 or to use the power on
>>> once per day?
>>> TIA
 
G

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Steffo wrote:
> I've heard the new Notebooks' generation has a far better cooling
> system and can be used as much as a desktop.
> Do you think it's true?
>
>
>> Edward J. Neth wrote:
>>> Leaving it running 27/7 is more harmful - notebooks aren't designed
>>> to run continuously and the heat will eventually kill one or more
>>> components (mainboard, hard drive).
>>>
>>>
>>> yodasue@webtv.net wrote:
>>>> Would it be more damaging to leave it on 24/7 or to use the power
>>>> on once per day?
>>>> TIA

CPU cooling is better with heat pipes. The designs are variable, but
heat pipe "radiators" are natural fiber traps, and depending on the
laptop, the heat pipe can become obstructed with fibers and eventually
fail to reject CPU heat. The only solution is to open the case and
remove the "felt" pad of fibers or have a warranty repair.

This fiber problem is exascerbated in the newer P4 laptops that need a
very high air flow. The fan moves a substantial amount of air but since
the radiator extends most of the width of the case, the air moves slowly
so fiber deposition is more efficient. Note that the problem of
radiator plugging appears (from usenet and other forum postings) at
about one year of normal use and many P4s are not yet that old. The
best fan designs appear to be those that have a metal screen over the
air inlet to the fan. The worst are those that use a plastic slotted
grill. The screen removes fibers far better than the slot which simply
passes the fibers to the cooling system.

So IMO that it is unwise to leave a laptop on 24/7, especially those
with heat pipe coolers, since the unit will filter air all that time
leading in many cases to CPU cooling failure from radiator plugging. On
P4 laptops I would run a temperature monitor like hmonitor.exe. As the
Pentium-M CPU speed increases, it is likely that similar cooling
problems can appear in these laptops.

It speaks volumes about laptop designers that apparently have no idea
that there is a common mode of cooling system failure for which there is
no ready solution except physically opening the case or seeking a
warranty repair.

Q
 

Brian

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Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Edward J. Neth <ejn63@netscape.net> wrote:
> Leaving it running 27/7 is more harmful - notebooks aren't designed to
> run continuously and the heat will eventually kill one or more
> components (mainboard, hard drive).

Is this based on an engineering metric? MTBF perhaps?
 
G

Guest

Guest
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"Steffo" <steffo@nospam.com> wrote:
>I've heard the new Notebooks' generation has a far better cooling system and
>can be used as much as a desktop.
>Do you thing it's true?

No, though I run my laptop in it's docking station nearly 7x24. If
I'm reducing it's lifetime from 10 years to 5 years by doing so, and
I'll have to replace the batteries after 2-3 years instead of 4-6
years, I'll burn that bridge when I come to it...
 
G

Guest

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Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Most likely Col. Mustard in the library with a hammer.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Well, perhaps Edward overstated it with his typo of 27/7, but heat is the major
enemy of any computer. Laptops even more so because the parts all fit together
in a very cramped space with little room for the airflow needed to insure cool
running when powered on continuously. All you need is a fan clogged with dust
and animal hair and you have a recipe for a hard catastrophic failure. Running
continuously draws air into the system and the air is anything but clean, unless
you are running the computer in an air conditioned facility with filtered and
cleaned air... Ben Myers

On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 19:03:08 +0000 (UTC), Brian <b@fake.com> wrote:

>Edward J. Neth <ejn63@netscape.net> wrote:
>> Leaving it running 27/7 is more harmful - notebooks aren't designed to
>> run continuously and the heat will eventually kill one or more
>> components (mainboard, hard drive).
>
>Is this based on an engineering metric? MTBF perhaps?
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
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Talkin Horse wrote:
> Most likely Col. Mustard in the library with a hammer.

LOL - good answer!
 

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