What's best CPU for a Socket 478?

oathmark1

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I'm rebuilding a Sony Vaio VGN C240E Laptop, and I can't tell what the socket is exactly. It has no CPU in it. I found out the CPU was originally in it online, and I found a 478 and 479 socket are compatible. I cannot find any information on the 479 socket however. What's the difference between the two, and is that going to help me in way?

So I'm looking for the best CPU I can put into it, and what would that be do you think?


Thanks
 

USAFRet

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Higher freq is NOT, by any means, the determinant of performance.

For instance:
A Pentium 4 Extreme - Proc base freq = 3.46GHz. Released Oct 2004, $1,000
https://ark.intel.com/products/27491/Pentium-4-Processor-Extreme-Edition-supporting-HT-Technology-3_46-GHz-2M-Cache-1066-MHz-FSB

i7-8700K - Proc base freq = 3.70 GHz. Release Q4-2017, $360
https://ark.intel.com/products/126684/Intel-Core-i7-8700K-Processor-12M-Cache-up-to-4_70-GHz


Pretty similar clock rate, right?
Not even a little bit close.
IPC (Instructions Per Clock) is also a key concept. (along with a LOT of other stuff)

For each tick of that 3.4GHz in the pentium 4, it will do 1 instruction. The new i7 will do 20 instruction.
Like having a 1 lane road vs a 20 lane road. Speed limit is still ~35mph, but how many more people can get to work, in the same amount of time, on the wider road?
 

oathmark1

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Is that something in the Manuf Specs? How do you find it out?
 

oathmark1

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I forgot to ask...

....I would like to know what is the general rule of thumb for comparing performance between CPU's whether they are of different sockets, different eras, different manufacturers, or any variable like that, so....

...I can drop down, and I can look at a list of all of the CPU's that fit in a socket on a system that I'm using, and I can see exactly which one is going to put the best performance in the system given all other spes like RAM limitations, type of mobo, and maybe even the budget of the client that's buying.

I think that the higher the frequency the better it is, but is that always 100% true? Also the more cores the better with more than 4 cores not applying to very many programs that are programmed to use more than 4 cores. More threads are better, but up to what point? What is the "cache" about, and how is that going to be more or less powerful depending on the cache rating?

And can you explain the way to tell a 32 bit CPU and/or Mobo from a 64 bit CPU and/or Mobo? And what does x86 and x64 imply about that. Are there any other " x** " ratings or categories that I don't know about?


I appreciate you time coming back with a reply to this topic.
Thanks
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
129,579
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Higher freq is NOT, by any means, the determinant of performance.

For instance:
A Pentium 4 Extreme - Proc base freq = 3.46GHz. Released Oct 2004, $1,000
https://ark.intel.com/products/27491/Pentium-4-Processor-Extreme-Edition-supporting-HT-Technology-3_46-GHz-2M-Cache-1066-MHz-FSB

i7-8700K - Proc base freq = 3.70 GHz. Release Q4-2017, $360
https://ark.intel.com/products/126684/Intel-Core-i7-8700K-Processor-12M-Cache-up-to-4_70-GHz


Pretty similar clock rate, right?
Not even a little bit close.
IPC (Instructions Per Clock) is also a key concept. (along with a LOT of other stuff)

For each tick of that 3.4GHz in the pentium 4, it will do 1 instruction. The new i7 will do 20 instruction.
Like having a 1 lane road vs a 20 lane road. Speed limit is still ~35mph, but how many more people can get to work, in the same amount of time, on the wider road?
 

oathmark1

Commendable
May 15, 2016
208
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I understand as far as the IPC goes in comparison with each other, but I don't see that anywhere on anyone's specs. Where do you find that?
 

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