Question Whats better for gaming/streaming? cores and threads, clockspeeds, or cache?

Apr 13, 2023
64
2
35
i was looking at the i5-13500 and the i7-12700kf and saw that the i7 has better clockspeeds by 1.1ghz and better boost speeds by .2ghz but the i5-13500 has better core count by 2 (it has 14 and the i7 has 12) and better L1 cache by 288kb (the i5 has 1248kb L1 cache and the i7 has 960kb L1 cache)
Note: they have the same thread count of 20
 

Math Geek

Titan
Ambassador
it's all important. you need as many cores/threads as the game requires. plus whatever extra for streaming and whatever else is running. too few cores/threads and something as to suffer from a core pulling double duty. too may and resources sit there unused.

once you have that covered, you have to look at how much work the core can do in a single cycle. known as IPC or instructions per clock. speed is not the only thing to consider. 5 ghz with an IPC of 100 would do less work than a 2 ghz core with an IPC of 1,000 !! (note that there is no such number attached to IPC, just an illustration for the point.)

2 cpu's with identical IPC would now look at speed as the faster one would do more cycles per second and thus more work (again note that 2 cpu's NEVER have the same IPC, it will be similar within a single gen of a single brand ie 13500k 13600k 13700k... but never identical. between brands you won't even get close to the same IPC). this is why reviewers will lock a cpu to say 4 ghz and run it next to another also at 4 ghz. same speed means same number of cycles per second. the one that does more work has a higher IPC.

once IPC is considered the xtra cache and such can now come into play as it can help feed a core better so it can do all that work easier.

as you can see its all important but in a sort of order. in the end though, you won't notice the difference between a 13600k or a 7600x if both have enough cores/threads to do what you need done. in general the more you want to do at one time, the more cores/threads you need.

keep in mind that intel's P-core and e-core thing are not the same cores. the p-cores are current gen strong cores and the e-cores are older tech thrown in to increase the count. might be enough to do the job, might not be depending on software needs. AMD on the other hand are all full current cores across the board.
 
Apr 13, 2023
64
2
35
it's all important. you need as many cores/threads as the game requires. plus whatever extra for streaming and whatever else is running. too few cores/threads and something as to suffer from a core pulling double duty. too may and resources sit there unused.

once you have that covered, you have to look at how much work the core can do in a single cycle. known as IPC or instructions per clock. speed is not the only thing to consider. 5 ghz with an IPC of 100 would do less work than a 2 ghz core with an IPC of 1,000 !! (note that there is no such number attached to IPC, just an illustration for the point.)

2 cpu's with identical IPC would now look at speed as the faster one would do more cycles per second and thus more work (again note that 2 cpu's NEVER have the same IPC, it will be similar within a single gen of a single brand ie 13500k 13600k 13700k... but never identical. between brands you won't even get close to the same IPC). this is why reviewers will lock a cpu to say 4 ghz and run it next to another also at 4 ghz. same speed means same number of cycles per second. the one that does more work has a higher IPC.

once IPC is considered the xtra cache and such can now come into play as it can help feed a core better so it can do all that work easier.

as you can see its all important but in a sort of order. in the end though, you won't notice the difference between a 13600k or a 7600x if both have enough cores/threads to do what you need done. in general the more you want to do at one time, the more cores/threads you need.

keep in mind that intel's P-core and e-core thing are not the same cores. the p-cores are current gen strong cores and the e-cores are older tech thrown in to increase the count. might be enough to do the job, might not be depending on software needs. AMD on the other hand are all full current cores across the board.
i have no idea what you said but ok
 

Math Geek

Titan
Ambassador
lol. it's a lot for sure. click the link for IPC as it's a good primer for learning about the topic.

the simple thing in the end is to look at some reviews of what you are looking at buying and see how it compares to other cpu's. the specs are just window dressing if it does what you need :)

can i ask what sparks the question? maybe can point you in the direction of some good info to start learning or other resource.
 
D

Deleted member 2838871

Guest
AMD on the other hand are all full current cores across the board.

That's why I went with the 7950x3D over the 7800x3D. Rather than getting the gaming king processor that lacks in other areas I wanted something that can do everything well... like video editing/encoding... streaming... etc... just some of the things I do in addition to gaming.
 

Math Geek

Titan
Ambassador
i have a 5900x for similar reasons. i run a ton of VM's and need the extra cores/threads to run it all. don't need flat out speed as much as i need more cores to work with. and of course a ton of ram

knowing what you want to do is the most important thing to know when deciding on what will get the job done. every piece of software runs differently and uses resources differently. knowing your needs goes a long way to knowing what to get.

but unless you are building for a very specific purpose, any of the new gen cpu's are all awesome for a normal all around pc. )

benchmarking and all that is fun but in the end makes little difference.


most people understand cars much better. amd vs intel is the same as those arguments you got into in high school about lambo vs Porsche vs ferrari vs whatever. 0 to 60 is better for this one but 1/4 mile is better for that one but the other one was .3 secs faster on the track and so on and so on. in the end if you had any of them you'd be happy and would have a blast no matter where you drove it.

we can argue all day about cpu specs but in the end, you're gonna be happy with any new cpu that has enough cores/threads to do the job. :)
 
i was looking at the i5-13500 and the i7-12700kf and saw that the i7 has better clockspeeds by 1.1ghz and better boost speeds by .2ghz but the i5-13500 has better core count by 2 (it has 14 and the i7 has 12) and better L1 cache by 288kb (the i5 has 1248kb L1 cache and the i7 has 960kb L1 cache)
Note: they have the same thread count of 20
Base clocks are irrelevant, it just tells you what minimum clocks you can expect if you lock the CPU to the Processor base power (TDP) watts and run a very heavy load.
Turbo clocks are almost the same so it doesn't really matter either.

The 12700 is 8/16 plus 4
the 13500 is 6/12 plus 8
Which means that the 13500 will run any games that are made for up to 6 cores perfectly, and many speculate that most games will remain on this level for a very long time.
It also has 8 efficiency cores which will easily be able to handle encoding a stream while you play without interfering at all with your gaming because they are treated as a different CPU by windows.

The 12700 will be able to handle games that are made for 8 cores better but I don't think there are any yet, and there might not be any for a long time, it also only has 4 e-cores which might not be quite enough for a good stream while gaming.

So the real question is do you want more main processing power and less background or more background and less main.

If you were serious about the f and non-f and it wasn't just a mistake then you can also use the iGPU of the non-f CPU for the streaming while f parts don't have graphics so the CPU would have to do the work.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BeastHotDogGUY
No two games are identical and they all want a different blend of the criteria that you put forth. Having said that, historically, single-core performance has been what matters most in gaming.

Streaming is a different beast because it benefits more from extra cores as it better allows the PC to stream while doing whatever it is that it is streaming in the first place. That's multitasking and multitasking always benefits from more cores.
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 2838871

Guest
No two games are identical and they all want a different blend of the criteria that you put forth.

Streaming is a different beast because it benefits more from extra cores as it better allows the PC to stream while doing whatever it is that it is streaming in the first place. That's multitasking and multitasking always benefits from more cores.

That's another reason I went 7950x3D over the 7800x3D. The latter may be "the best gaming CPU" but it lags way behind in stuff like streaming and video editing/encoding... etc... all stuff I do.

I went for double the cores over a few (maybe) extra fps that I might not even see or need due to the 4090 doing all the work at 4K resolution... and I went x3D over the 7950x due to the lower power draw and thermals.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Avro Arrow
That's another reason I went 7950x3D over the 7800x3D. The latter may be "the best gaming CPU" but it lags way behind in stuff like streaming and video editing/encoding... etc... all stuff I do.

I went for double the cores over a few (maybe) extra fps that I might not even see or need due to the 4090 doing all the work at 4K resolution... and I went x3D over the 7950x due to the lower power draw and thermals.
See, I never saw the point of the R9-7950X3D because the R9-7950X is already a great gaming CPU and an even better productivity CPU despite being a good deal cheaper.

For streaming and video encoding, I think that the X3D designation would be an albatross around your neck.
 
D

Deleted member 2838871

Guest
See, I never saw the point of the R9-7950X3D because the R9-7950X is already a great gaming CPU and an even better productivity CPU despite being a good deal cheaper.

For streaming and video encoding, I think that the X3D designation would be an albatross around your neck.

I dunno... I didn't do much research into the 7950x... I was set on the x3D variant... be it the 7800 or the 7950.

I went with the 7950... and regardless of how the x3D compares to the non-x3D... I know the power draw and thermals are better on the x3D... and I would take that even if there is a small loss of productivity performance attached.

At the end of the day I'm not gonna nickel and dime over performance... all are good processors... some are better at certain things than others... i.e. the 7800x3D being great at gaming and not so much at productivity... etc... etc...
 
  • Like
Reactions: Avro Arrow
I dunno... I didn't do much research into the 7950x... I was set on the x3D variant... be it the 7800 or the 7950.

I went with the 7950... and regardless of how the x3D compares to the non-x3D... I know the power draw and thermals are better on the x3D... and I would take that even if there is a small loss of productivity performance attached.

At the end of the day I'm not gonna nickel and dime over performance... all are good processors... some are better at certain things than others... i.e. the 7800x3D being great at gaming and not so much at productivity... etc... etc...
Well, there's no question that you have one of, if not the, top gaming CPU on the planet. Objective achieved! :giggle:(y)
 
D

Deleted member 2838871

Guest
Well, there's no question that you have one of, if not the, top gaming CPU on the planet. Objective achieved! :giggle:(y)

Yeah and at the end of the day future upgrade paths were equally as important. I'm already seeing the "Ryzen 8000 series info leaked!" videos on Youtube... and if the 8000 series curbstomps these processors the upgrade will be super easy swapping chips to the same board.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Avro Arrow
Yeah and at the end of the day future upgrade paths were equally as important. I'm already seeing the "Ryzen 8000 series info leaked!" videos on Youtube... and if the 8000 series curbstomps these processors the upgrade will be super easy swapping chips to the same board.
Yep, that was one of the big reasons that I bought my first AM4 combo (R7-1700, X370 Killer SLI, 16GB Team Dark DDR4-2400). Drop-in CPU upgrades are amazing. Of course, since I'm only a gamer, I'm going to ride my R7-5800X3D for a loooong time because I know that I won't really see any advantage of a CPU upgrade over it for many years to come when it comes to gaming.

I figure that, by the time I want to upgrade from the 5800X3D, AM5 stuff will be dirt cheap. That's the method to my madness. :LOL:
 
While I could go on about theoreticals here, ultimately it shouldn't matter. Don't make a selection based on specs alone, make a selection based on how it actually performs.

Regarding streaming though, which I'm assuming through Twitch or YouTube or something, if you don't care about having uber quality VODs, just use the video card's encoder. It's geared towards speed.