Question What's the difference between Asus RT-AX3000 and TUF-AX3000

THpubs

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I need a good stable router for our small office. It need to be able to handle multiple devices and should have a good range. Also want better bandwidth monitoring. I picked RT-AX3000 and TUF-AX3000. What's the difference of these two? What will be best suited for my use case?
 

kanewolf

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I need a good stable router for our small office. It need to be able to handle multiple devices and should have a good range. Also want better bandwidth monitoring. I picked RT-AX3000 and TUF-AX3000. What's the difference of these two? What will be best suited for my use case?
How many total devices connected? How many wired, how many WIFI?
I would recommend a more business grade router. Asus is fine for home, but I would recommend a wired router and WIFI access point(s) for a business setting.
To your question...
The TUF is marketed to gamers. It is flashy looking and probably has LEDs.
Under the hood, they are the same from the specs I can find. Same CPU, same clock speed. Same RAM and ROM.

Personally, I would find a router that is supported by merlin firmware -- https://www.asuswrt-merlin.net/ The goals of merlin are stability and security. Not gaming performance.
For an upgrade from the "home" router segment you can look at Ubiquiti UniFI
 
I have not looked the price up but many times vendors put a sticker on a device saying "gamer" raise the price 50% and see if some idiot will buy it.

I have not spent any time looking up any difference there could I guess be software difference.....even though any kind of "gamer" feature in a router don't really do much.

From a hardware standpoint they seem to be pretty much identical. They use exactly the same FCCid. This means all the main parts like cpu and radio chips are identical in all ways. Many times even small changes like adding memory or sometime even changing the brand of memory requires them to recertify the device with the FCC.

So I would suspect they will perform exactly the same. Other features such as what the box looks like only you can decide if it has value. Kinda like how much LED stuff you find on equipment which seem very important to some people.
 

THpubs

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How many total devices connected? How many wired, how many WIFI?
I would recommend a more business grade router. Asus is fine for home, but I would recommend a wired router and WIFI access point(s) for a business setting.
To your question...
The TUF is marketed to gamers. It is flashy looking and probably has LEDs.
Under the hood, they are the same from the specs I can find. Same CPU, same clock speed. Same RAM and ROM.

Personally, I would find a router that is supported by merlin firmware -- https://www.asuswrt-merlin.net/ The goals of merlin are stability and security. Not gaming performance.
For an upgrade from the "home" router segment you can look at Ubiquiti UniFI
The problem is, there's no Ubiquity in our country. The next option is TP-LINK AC1750. But I don't think it have a good range like the Asus router.
 

kanewolf

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The problem is, there's no Ubiquity in our country. The next option is TP-LINK AC1750. But I don't think it have a good range like the Asus router.
Range is probably the same. All routers transmit at the maximum allowed power levels.
If range is really a problem, then you need more than one WIFI source connected together by an ethernet cable.
 

THpubs

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Range is probably the same. All routers transmit at the maximum allowed power levels.
If range is really a problem, then you need more than one WIFI source connected together by an ethernet cable.
Do you recommend TP-LINK AC1750 than the Asus router for my use case? I specially need to monitor and limit the bandwidth of individual devices.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Do you recommend TP-LINK AC1750 than the Asus router for my use case? I specially need to monitor and limit the bandwidth of individual devices.
You never answered how many wired and how many wireless devices?
Since you are talking about WIFI coverage, how much area (sq m) do you have to cover ?
What is the furthest distance? Are there walls that will interfere with coverage?

I have never used bandwidth limiting, so I can't comment on those features.
 

THpubs

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You never answered how many wired and how many wireless devices?
Since you are talking about WIFI coverage, how much area (sq m) do you have to cover ?
What is the furthest distance? Are there walls that will interfere with coverage?

I have never used bandwidth limiting, so I can't comment on those features.
Ah sorry! I have around 15 wireless devices. The furthest distance is around 100m (Including outside the building). There are concrete pillars but it's mostly glass.
 

kanewolf

Titan
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Ah sorry! I have around 15 wireless devices. The furthest distance is around 100m (Including outside the building). There are concrete pillars but it's mostly glass.
You will NEVER get reliable WIFI 100m from a single WIFI source. If you want outdoor coverage then you need outdoor WIFI access point(s).
Glass may completely block WIFI if it is energy efficient glass. That type glass may have metallic film which blocks WIFI.
 

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