[SOLVED] What's the last partition on my SSD?

blue_rays

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Aug 1, 2014
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Hey there, My (mx500) SDD is fully partitioned by Windows 10. Recently, I noticed that there is a 509MB partition at the end of my drive. What's that? Can I merge it to the last partition?

image:
View: https://imgur.com/dG7r5Xo


My other question is about the free space remaining on my C drive. Can I split my C drive and install a linux distribution too and is that enough to allocate 170GB for windows 10? I'm using my windows 10 for a while and there may not be any more software to install on C.
 
Solution
looks to be a system partition with no drive letter assigned.
as the FAT32 is near full & other is full, i would imagine they are also system partitions created by the OS used.
manipulating these partitions could likely interfere with the booting and/or use of this OS.

if going for a dual-boot off a single drive with separate OS partitions it would probably be better to format this drive and start fresh.
install Linux by creating the smallest partition necessary for it and any included applications and let it create it's separate system partitions.
then have Windows use leftover drive space to create it's main and other system partitions.
Recently, I noticed that there is a 509MB partition at the end of my drive. What's that? Can I merge it to the last partition?
Do not merge anything, results can be unpredictable. Recovery partition houses recovery environment.
But if you want to get rid of it, then delete the partition. Recovery environment will no longer be available.
To get to recovery environment, you can boot from windows installation media instead.
Can I split my C drive and install a linux distribution too and is that enough to allocate 170GB for windows 10?
Sure. If you don't install a lot of software, then 170GB can be enough for windows.
 
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looks to be a system partition with no drive letter assigned.
as the FAT32 is near full & other is full, i would imagine they are also system partitions created by the OS used.
manipulating these partitions could likely interfere with the booting and/or use of this OS.

if going for a dual-boot off a single drive with separate OS partitions it would probably be better to format this drive and start fresh.
install Linux by creating the smallest partition necessary for it and any included applications and let it create it's separate system partitions.
then have Windows use leftover drive space to create it's main and other system partitions.
 
Solution

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
if going for a dual-boot off a single drive with separate OS partitions it would probably be better to format this drive and start fresh.
install Linux by creating the smallest partition necessary for it and any included applications and let it create it's separate system partitions.
then have Windows use leftover drive space to create it's main and other system partitions.
Actually, install Windows first, then Linux.

The other way around, the subsequent Windows install will screw up the Linux boot partition.

Windows first, then Linux.
 
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