Question Whats the stable tempreture for Amd ryzen 7 2700

Jul 8, 2019
21
0
15
0
I just overclocked my ryzen 2700 cpu from 3,2ghz to 4.0ghz with a voltage of 1,25. Is this stable? I get around 86 degrees when stress testing and 70 degrees while gaming
 
"AMD specifies 85°C as the maximum safe temperature for a Ryzen™ 7 2700X processor. Ideally, you would want to have at least 20°C to 30°C of thermal headroom at stock before thinking of overclocking the chip. " https://www.msi.com/blog/overclock-amd-ryzen-7-2700x-x470-motherboard-guide

Sounds like you had a fair amount of room before the OC and at 70C you are OK. However, it wouldn't hurt to improve your cooling especially if you are using the stock cooler right now.
 
"AMD specifies 85°C as the maximum safe temperature for a Ryzen™ 7 2700X processor. Ideally, you would want to have at least 20°C to 30°C of thermal headroom at stock before thinking of overclocking the chip. " https://www.msi.com/blog/overclock-amd-ryzen-7-2700x-x470-motherboard-guide
....
Of course, that's relevant to 2700X.

https://www.amd.com/en/products/cpu/amd-ryzen-7-2700

AMD max temps are 95C for a 2700! AMD's very own published number there. That said of course, keeping temperature as low as possible is a good idea since any temperature (above absolute zero) advances degradation inevitably. 85C is a good 'line in the sand' to use for a working temperature, i.e., the fully stabilized temperature while your processor is running extremely long-duration heavy processing tasks.

I like that temp because right about there is where my processor will 'stabilize' under an extremely heavy task (prime95) with everything on full 'auto'. That means the algorithm has lowered frequency and voltage as needed to keep under it, so it must be what the algorithm thinks is proper and 'safe'.
 
Last edited:
Of course, that's relevant to 2700X.

https://www.amd.com/en/products/cpu/amd-ryzen-7-2700

AMD max temps are 95C for a 2700! AMD's very own published number there. That said of course, keeping temperature as low as possible is a good idea since any temperature (above absolute zero) advances degradation inevitably. 85C is a good 'line in the sand' to use for a working temperature, i.e., the fully stabilized temperature while your processor is running extremely long-duration heavy processing tasks.

I like that temp because right about there is where my processor will 'stabilize' under an extremely heavy task (prime95) with everything on full 'auto'. That means the algorithm has lowered frequency and voltage as needed to keep under it, so it must be what the algorithm thinks is proper and 'safe'.
Interesting that the 2700 & 2700X have a 10C difference in max operating temps. All the other 8 core CPUs (1000, 2000, & 3000 series) have 95C whereas 2700X is the lone 85C. Even the 6 core are 95C, makes me wonder if their 2700X info has a misprint.
 
Interesting that the 2700 & 2700X have a 10C difference in max operating temps. All the other 8 core CPUs (1000, 2000, & 3000 series) have 95C whereas 2700X is the lone 85C. Even the 6 core are 95C, makes me wonder if their 2700X info has a misprint.
I doubt very seriously it would be a misprint left there for two years now, published into every CPU box manual (very tiny...use a magnifier to find it) and driving a major financial liability to the corporation (warranty returns vs. relative market performance). Marketing and IT heads roll for things like that.

I think it has a lot more to do with the 105W TDP of a 2700X and how that spills down through it's operating parameters. That processor is also pretty well known to respond incredibly well to PBO tweaking, giving sometimes amazing sustained boost clocks even under heavy loads if extremely well cooled.
 
"Oh what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive."
-Walter Scott, Marmion

Every time that crazy 'offset' comes up in topics like this that's the first thing to pop into my mind.
Higher temp is used internally by XFR to regulate core frequency and keep temps down, also is used by every core separately. Temp with offset is shown externally for monitoring and adjust fan speed for instance.
3rd gen shows more places temp is taken, (highest) core, die as well as for each chiplet. In case of dual chiplet like in 39xx, each chiplets temp is shown.
Core temps are used by XFR and PBO.
Those are safety as well as performance values. About 95c is cutoff temp where a core will shut down to prevent damage while at over 62-65c that core's boost gets lowered to maintain integrity. In theory at least that overload of hottest core is moved to a core that's coolest. Performance suffers less that way.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS