Question What's your favorite form factor when building a PC?

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nofanneeded

Upstanding
Sep 29, 2019
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LOL. Speak only for yourself, please.

I still use all three.
  • Optical for backups (BD-R), ripping CDs, and reading old disks I burned years ago.
  • 3.5" HDDs for RAID
  • 2.5" SSDs because they're still the most cost-effective and fast enough for most purposes.
I also have a HH/HL PCIe SSD (NVMe 1.0), in one of my systems.
I totally Agree , I also wish some one could make a 1TB Opitcal Disk somewhere ... it is by far the best backup media available after tape backups.
 

nofanneeded

Upstanding
Sep 29, 2019
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I'm a fan of the ATX FF mainboard, however I've been using the Cooler Master HAF922 for about 14 years...lol just keep changing out the guts. Thing is a beast for space, and I've been using it more as a split between server/gaming rig lately. Fans for days!
I Miss the HAF days , nowadays cooler master cases are inferior sadly. they need to Bring back the good HAF cases ...
 

jimmysmitty

Champion
Moderator
I'm Waiting For a 1 GB Processor Cache, Which could be possible in the future.
Considering the advancements with HBM and 3D stacking I would say so. I would say Intel would be first but you never know. AMD sometimes beats them to the punch. But when it comes to something like that and what I have seen recently I would say Intel is ahead in the technology to make that viable.
 
Nov 27, 2019
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Why this? Just curious.
  1. Because I do a lot of development and I test apps across various technologies.
  2. I can run multiple networks on different subnets with multiple NICs.
  3. I can also use NIC teaming (I often move lots of data around the network)
  4. To a lesser degree LBFO (Load balancing and fail over)
 
Reactions: bit_user

bit_user

Splendid
Ambassador
Considering the advancements with HBM and 3D stacking I would say so. I would say Intel would be first but you never know. AMD sometimes beats them to the punch. But when it comes to something like that and what I have seen recently I would say Intel is ahead in the technology to make that viable.
Funny thing is that the last generation of Intel's Xeon Phi had 16 GB of in-package MCDRAM stacks that you had the option of using as a L3 cache. This was way back in 2016.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xeon_Phi#Knights_Landing

Even though Xeon Phi is no more, at least you can truly say that Intel did it first.
 

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