[SOLVED] When buying a CPU + Motherboard, how do you know if motherboard has good enough VRMs?

denislenut

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Jun 16, 2018
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I usually hear out there that a low end motherboard can bottleneck a high end CPU since its not able to deliver all the power the CPU needs or if it does, its not stable voltage and VRMs overheat a lot.

So my question is... In the event of buying, let's say a Core i7 12700, how does one check what motherboard fits that CPU? How do you know the motherboard will meet the power demands of the CPU without bottlenecking it or overheating the VRMs?
 
Solution
I usually hear out there that a low end motherboard can bottleneck a high end CPU since its not able to deliver all the power the CPU needs or if it does, its not stable voltage and VRMs overheat a lot.

So my question is... In the event of buying, let's say a Core i7 12700, how does one check what motherboard fits that CPU? How do you know the motherboard will meet the power demands of the CPU without bottlenecking it or overheating the VRMs?
If the board's specs don't state phases, capitors, etc ... then most likely it has crap VRM's.

Here's an example of a board with good VRM's.

https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/Z690-GAMING-X-DDR4-rev-10#kf
I usually hear out there that a low end motherboard can bottleneck a high end CPU since its not able to deliver all the power the CPU needs or if it does, its not stable voltage and VRMs overheat a lot.

So my question is... In the event of buying, let's say a Core i7 12700, how does one check what motherboard fits that CPU? How do you know the motherboard will meet the power demands of the CPU without bottlenecking it or overheating the VRMs?
Usually watch reviews and tests online, they have much info regarding about it. Bullzoid, Hardware Unboxed, GamerNexus, and much more.
 
I usually hear out there that a low end motherboard can bottleneck a high end CPU since its not able to deliver all the power the CPU needs or if it does, its not stable voltage and VRMs overheat a lot.

So my question is... In the event of buying, let's say a Core i7 12700, how does one check what motherboard fits that CPU? How do you know the motherboard will meet the power demands of the CPU without bottlenecking it or overheating the VRMs?
If the board's specs don't state phases, capitors, etc ... then most likely it has crap VRM's.

Here's an example of a board with good VRM's.

https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/Z690-GAMING-X-DDR4-rev-10#kf
 
Solution
Yeah, I normally look up boards before I buy, I usually try to got for overkill on the VRMs, then that way they normally tend to run cooler and often give a more stable voltage for overclocking. I like watching Buildzoid or (Actually Hardcore Overclocking) on youtube, he goes well into details on some boards that its almost not English to me lol