Question Where do I plug my gpu into the power supply when the plugs are all occupied?

lmm6877

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I have a gpu that requires a 6pin connector, but I don't see where I can plug it into my psu. I have two hard drives taking up the one plug that splits, and another is in the disc drive -- can I use the end that splits off of the disc drive with some sort of adapter plug?
 
Now either your power supply is modular and there are some empty sockets on it, or it's a cheap pre-built PC. Because all PSUs built in the last 15 years have at least one 6 pin connector.
If it's a cheap PC and the PSU doesn't have any empty sockets, then you'll need to get a new PSU, but be careful that it doesn't require propitiatory connectors.
If the PSU has empty sockets, then you'll need to get the correct cable for your PSU....these would've come with the PSU but if a shop put it together they may've kept the extra cables.
 
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Now either your power supply is modular and there are some empty sockets on it, or it's a cheap pre-built PC. Because all PSUs built in the last 15 years have at least one 6 pin connector.
If it's a cheap PC and the PSU doesn't have any empty sockets, then you'll need to get a new PSU, but be careful that it doesn't require propitiatory connectors.
If the PSU has empty sockets, then you'll need to get the correct cable for your PSU....these would've come with the PSU but if a shop put it together they may've kept the extra cables.
that sounds like fairytail to use modular psu on prebuilt without gpu :)
 

MadsModsat

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It is usually advised against using any type of adaptor for powering the graphics card.

If the PSU doesn't come with the right connectors, it is usually not powerfull enough, old or poor quality.

In your case, where the PSU is a OEM 300 watt, the reason why it doesn't have a 6-pin connector is obviously because it is not able to supply sufficient power.

You don't mention what GPU you have, but I would consider i highly unlikely, that a GPU which requires an extra 6-pin connector, can be powered by any 300 watt OEM PSU
 
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lmm6877

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It is usually advised against using any type of adaptor for powering the graphics card.

If the PSU doesn't come with the right connectors, it is usually not powerfull enough, old or poor quality.

In your case, where the PSU is a OEM 300 watt, the reason why it doesn't have a 6-pin connector is obviously because it is not able to supply sufficient power.

You don't mention what GPU you have, but I would consider i highly unlikely, that a GPU which requires an extra 6-pin connector, can be powered by any 300 watt OEM PSU
Thank you. Yeah, I got the GTX 650 ti, not realizing it had an external power supply requirement, and as you can probably tell I am very unfamiliar with this type of GPU.
What should I look for in a PSU when I go to buy a new one? Assuming I can just upgrade this one and be good to go..
Thanks
 

MadsModsat

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Depending on what pre-built OEM computer you have, there can be a few potential issues.

Often, if the pre-built is using standardized measurements such as a normal ATX size case, as one example, it should be possible to install another PSU without encountering a lot of problems, if any.

Other times, some pre-built manufacturers use uncommen shapes and sizes for the connectors, and sometimes uncommon sizes of their cases, in which case it is difficult to make a direct upgrade of the PSU with off-the-shelf components.

I'll try and look-up a Dell 580, I'm not familiar with this particular model, so I can't say what is possible in your situation

EDIT : According to this question on the Dell official site, it should be straight forward to upgrade the PSU to something different

Only thing I notice is, that it is aparrently a small case, so a fully modular PSU would be recommended, to avoid cable clutter which could reduce airflow and decrease cooling performance as a result of that
 
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lmm6877

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Depending on what pre-built OEM computer you have, there can be a few potential issues.

Often, if the pre-built is using standardized measurements such as a normal ATX size case, as one example, it should be possible to install another PSU without encountering a lot of problems, if any.

Other times, some pre-built manufacturers use uncommen shapes and sizes for the connectors, and sometimes uncommon sizes of their cases, in which case it is difficult to make a direct upgrade of the PSU with off-the-shelf components.

I'll try and look-up a Dell 580, I'm not familiar with this particular model, so I can't say what is possible in your situation

EDIT : According to this question on the Dell official site, it should be straight forward to upgrade the PSU to something different

Only thing I notice is, that it is aparrently a small case, so a fully modular PSU would be recommended, to avoid cable clutter which could reduce airflow and decrease cooling performance as a result of that
Okay then. Thank you so much for your help, much appreciated! Looks like I'm off to shop for power supplies. Have a great weekend!
 

MadsModsat

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Don't go for the lowest price and highest watt. Some people don't find it very interesting to buy a power supply, which is a mistake. You don't need the most expensive one either.

But a reliable PSU of good quality is important, because if a PSU is of poor quality or inadequate performance, when the PSU fails, it will in a worst case scenario damage most of your other hardware.

So a good mix between relaibility, quality and the needed performance for the system in question, is highly recommended.

I don't know exactly what would be a good recommendation for your particular setup, but I know there's a great amount of good advice on these forums with regards to PSUs for any need
 
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