Where is Drive Letter?

G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I just installed a DVD r/rw. I set the jumper on drive to master and the
other CD drives jumper to slave, and now I only see one drive (DVD) letter.
Where did CD drive letter go? When I go to device manager it says its
working properly, but it doesn't. I've tried to put a CD in the drive but
nothing happens. What could be the problem?
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

If your system is relativly new, set both drives to "CS" (cable select).

Bill Crocker


"Dooglo" <Dooglo@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:C932C97F-DA32-4B44-895E-9522A0E940DA@microsoft.com...
>I just installed a DVD r/rw. I set the jumper on drive to master and the
> other CD drives jumper to slave, and now I only see one drive (DVD)
> letter.
> Where did CD drive letter go? When I go to device manager it says its
> working properly, but it doesn't. I've tried to put a CD in the drive but
> nothing happens. What could be the problem?
>
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

OK. Thanks I'll try it.



"Bill Crocker" wrote:

> If your system is relativly new, set both drives to "CS" (cable select).
>
> Bill Crocker
>
>
> "Dooglo" <Dooglo@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:C932C97F-DA32-4B44-895E-9522A0E940DA@microsoft.com...
> >I just installed a DVD r/rw. I set the jumper on drive to master and the
> > other CD drives jumper to slave, and now I only see one drive (DVD)
> > letter.
> > Where did CD drive letter go? When I go to device manager it says its
> > working properly, but it doesn't. I've tried to put a CD in the drive but
> > nothing happens. What could be the problem?
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

CS didn't work.
So, I put it back the way I had it. DVD master, CD Slave.

But still no CD drive letter, and it won't work though device manager says
it works fine.


"Dooglo" wrote:

> OK. Thanks I'll try it.
>
>
>
> "Bill Crocker" wrote:
>
> > If your system is relativly new, set both drives to "CS" (cable select).
> >
> > Bill Crocker
> >
> >
> > "Dooglo" <Dooglo@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> > news:C932C97F-DA32-4B44-895E-9522A0E940DA@microsoft.com...
> > >I just installed a DVD r/rw. I set the jumper on drive to master and the
> > > other CD drives jumper to slave, and now I only see one drive (DVD)
> > > letter.
> > > Where did CD drive letter go? When I go to device manager it says its
> > > working properly, but it doesn't. I've tried to put a CD in the drive but
> > > nothing happens. What could be the problem?
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
> >
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

If you put a disc in, and the drive does not respond (no light on the
front), I would suspect either the power connector is not seated properly,
or the drive itself is defective. Even when the M/S is set wrong, the drive
should still spin up when a disc is inserted.

Bobby

"Dooglo" <Dooglo@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:29424D93-6A8B-4302-B742-775CCE96D6E2@microsoft.com...
> OK. Thanks I'll try it.
>
>
>
> "Bill Crocker" wrote:
>
>> If your system is relativly new, set both drives to "CS" (cable select).
>>
>> Bill Crocker
>>
>>
>> "Dooglo" <Dooglo@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:C932C97F-DA32-4B44-895E-9522A0E940DA@microsoft.com...
>> >I just installed a DVD r/rw. I set the jumper on drive to master and
>> >the
>> > other CD drives jumper to slave, and now I only see one drive (DVD)
>> > letter.
>> > Where did CD drive letter go? When I go to device manager it says its
>> > working properly, but it doesn't. I've tried to put a CD in the drive
>> > but
>> > nothing happens. What could be the problem?
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Bill Crocker wrote:
> If your system is relativly new, set both drives to "CS" (cable
> select).
> Bill Crocker

Huh?! Cable select is unnecessary these days. I'm surprised drives still
have the option. Master/slave is the correct method of setting up opticals -
indeed any drive. I've not used CS as a setting for years (though my
father's Optiplex still insists on it).


--
My great-grandfather was born and raised in Elgin - did he eventually
lose his marbles?
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Miss Perspicacia Tick" <misstick@lancre.dw> wrote in message
news:hLUgd.23974$8p4.6389@fe48.usenetserver.com...
> Bill Crocker wrote:
>> If your system is relativly new, set both drives to "CS" (cable
>> select).
>> Bill Crocker
>
> Huh?! Cable select is unnecessary these days. I'm surprised drives still
> have the option. Master/slave is the correct method of setting up
> opticals - indeed any drive. I've not used CS as a setting for years
> (though my father's Optiplex still insists on it).

Absolute nonsense. As Bill Crocker recommended, cable select is most
certainly the way to go with modern drives and motherboards. By setting all
your devices (hard drive(s) and optical drives) to cable select, it
facilitates the configuration of these devices. With CS, it's the position
on the IDE cable that determines its Master/Slave relationship. Thus, when
the device is attached to the end connector of the IDE cable, it is
configured as Master; connecting it to the middle connector of the cable
configures the device as Slave. Once you've set the jumper(s) to CS there's
no need to change the jumper setting should you change the Master/Slave
relationship of the device(s). Again, it's the position on the IDE cable
that determines whether it is Master or Slave. It is assumed that you will
be using a standard 80-wire 40-pin IDE cable to connect these devices.

Art
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Art" <noonehere@longone.net> wrote in message
news:eQs9RlvvEHA.3276@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
> "Miss Perspicacia Tick" <misstick@lancre.dw> wrote in message
> news:hLUgd.23974$8p4.6389@fe48.usenetserver.com...
>> Bill Crocker wrote:
>>> If your system is relativly new, set both drives to "CS" (cable
>>> select).
>>> Bill Crocker
>>
>> Huh?! Cable select is unnecessary these days. I'm surprised drives still
>> have the option. Master/slave is the correct method of setting up
>> opticals - indeed any drive. I've not used CS as a setting for years
>> (though my father's Optiplex still insists on it).
>
> Absolute nonsense. As Bill Crocker recommended, cable select is most
> certainly the way to go with modern drives and motherboards. By setting
> all your devices (hard drive(s) and optical drives) to cable select, it
> facilitates the configuration of these devices. With CS, it's the position
> on the IDE cable that determines its Master/Slave relationship. Thus, when
> the device is attached to the end connector of the IDE cable, it is
> configured as Master; connecting it to the middle connector of the cable
> configures the device as Slave. Once you've set the jumper(s) to CS
> there's no need to change the jumper setting should you change the
> Master/Slave relationship of the device(s). Again, it's the position on
> the IDE cable that determines whether it is Master or Slave. It is assumed
> that you will be using a standard 80-wire 40-pin IDE cable to connect
> these devices.
>
> Art
>

I agree that CS is coming back into fashion, but its utility depends on
where the devices are in the case, and how easy it is to move them so that
the cable will reach properly with the configuration you want. Manufacturers
are using CS a lot, but they often have cables that are designed
specifically to fit their case configuration, so there's no other way to
plug things in.

Personally, I prefer master and slave settings because I know that they
aren't going to change if someone decides to go in there are start swapping
cables. It's hard enough for most people to remember which way the red
stripe is supposed to go, without also having to remember which of two
drives (which look identical to them) belongs on the end of the cable.

Then again, I've threatened to assemble certain computers with tamperproof
screws, just to keep that sort of fiddling under control.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

>>> Bill Crocker wrote:
>>>> If your system is relativly new, set both drives to "CS" (cable
>>>> select).
>>>> Bill Crocker

>> "Miss Perspicacia Tick" <misstick@lancre.dw> wrote in message
>> news:hLUgd.23974$8p4.6389@fe48.usenetserver.com...
>>> Huh?! Cable select is unnecessary these days. I'm surprised drives still
>>> have the option. Master/slave is the correct method of setting up
>>> opticals - indeed any drive. I've not used CS as a setting for years
>>> (though my father's Optiplex still insists on it).
>>

> "Art" <noonehere@longone.net> wrote in message
> news:eQs9RlvvEHA.3276@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> Absolute nonsense. As Bill Crocker recommended, cable select is most
>> certainly the way to go with modern drives and motherboards. By setting
>> all your devices (hard drive(s) and optical drives) to cable select, it
>> facilitates the configuration of these devices. With CS, it's the
>> position on the IDE cable that determines its Master/Slave relationship.
>> Thus, when the device is attached to the end connector of the IDE cable,
>> it is configured as Master; connecting it to the middle connector of the
>> cable configures the device as Slave. Once you've set the jumper(s) to CS
>> there's no need to change the jumper setting should you change the
>> Master/Slave relationship of the device(s). Again, it's the position on
>> the IDE cable that determines whether it is Master or Slave. It is
>> assumed that you will be using a standard 80-wire 40-pin IDE cable to
>> connect these devices.
>>
>> Art


Please see my inline comments...

"D.Currie" <dmbcurrie.nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:2ul2n9F2992svU1@uni-berlin.de...
> I agree that CS is coming back into fashion, but its utility depends on
> where the devices are in the case, and how easy it is to move them so that
> the cable will reach properly with the configuration you want.
> Manufacturers are using CS a lot, but they often have cables that are
> designed specifically to fit their case configuration, so there's no other
> way to plug things in.
I'm not sure I quite understand this. What does cable length have to do with
a Cable Select configuration? While it is true that cable length is
dependent upon the physical placement of the IDE devices in the computer
case, it wouldn't seem that there's any relevancy as to the jumper
configuration of these devices.

> Personally, I prefer master and slave settings because I know that they
> aren't going to change if someone decides to go in there are start
> swapping cables. It's hard enough for most people to remember which way
> the red stripe is supposed to go, without also having to remember which of
> two drives (which look identical to them) belongs on the end of the cable.
But that's precisely the beauty of configuring your devices with Cable
Select. Using CS, the Master/Slave relationship depends upon how the device
is connected to the IDE cable, i.e., middle or end connector. Thus, you're
never concerned with jumper settings. It's a real plus when you're working
on computers.

Art
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Art" <noonehere@longone.net> wrote in message
news:OLrSMS5vEHA.2120@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Please see my inline comments...
>
> "D.Currie" <dmbcurrie.nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:2ul2n9F2992svU1@uni-berlin.de...
>> I agree that CS is coming back into fashion, but its utility depends on
>> where the devices are in the case, and how easy it is to move them so
>> that the cable will reach properly with the configuration you want.
>> Manufacturers are using CS a lot, but they often have cables that are
>> designed specifically to fit their case configuration, so there's no
>> other way to plug things in.
> I'm not sure I quite understand this. What does cable length have to do
> with a Cable Select configuration? While it is true that cable length is
> dependent upon the physical placement of the IDE devices in the computer
> case, it wouldn't seem that there's any relevancy as to the jumper
> configuration of these devices.


If you're using cable select, the master has to be at the end of the cable,
as you said. Depending on where the drives are in the case and the
configuration of the cable, it might not work out to have the drive you want
as master to be at the end, and for the slave in the middle. For example, if
you wanted a hard drive as master and CD as slave on the same IDE, but your
hard drive bays are closer to the mobo and the CDs are way at the top, there
might not be enough cable length to get the middle portion up to the CD and
then the end all the way back down to the hard drive. You may have no other
choice than to have the middle connector on the hard drive and the end
reaching up to the CD. Never mind about the argument about a hard drive and
CD on the same cable, it's just an example.

On some computers, and with plenty of cables at the ready with a variety of
lengths and distances between connectors, it may not be an issue because you
can probably hunt up a cable that will fit the case configuration or move
the drives to make it work better. But sometimes you've got to work with
what you've got, and if the cables don't reach, they don't reach, and if the
drives can't be moved far, there's nothing you can do about that, either. So
the master's going to have to be set by jumper so it can be plugged into the
middle connector and still work as master.

It has nothing to do with the jumpers themselves.

If you were questioning my comment about the oems, if you've looked at some
of those lately, you'll find that the cables are made to fit exactly where
they are, with no way to plug them in differently or move the drives very
far. So if someone unplugs the cables, they've got a real good chance that
the cables are going to go back the same way again, so there's no chance
master and slave could change. It might also have something to do with ease
in assembly for the oem. They can probably order all their drives set to CS
and not worry about it when the computers are assembled because there's only
one way it's all going to fit, and there's no need to have anyone change
jumpers around as part of the process.

With a home-built or custom-build system that uses standard length cables
and a more configurable case, chances are there are multiple ways those
cables could get plugged in. So there's greater chance someone could
inadvertenly switch master and slave just by pluggin in the cables in a
different order.

I really don't think either way is better than the other, just what works
best for you. In my experience, people are more likely to unplug cables than
they are to move jumpers. So setting the drives for master and slave via
jumper is less likely to get changed accidentally than using the position on
the cable to determine which is master.


>
>> Personally, I prefer master and slave settings because I know that they
>> aren't going to change if someone decides to go in there are start
>> swapping cables. It's hard enough for most people to remember which way
>> the red stripe is supposed to go, without also having to remember which
>> of two drives (which look identical to them) belongs on the end of the
>> cable.
> But that's precisely the beauty of configuring your devices with Cable
> Select. Using CS, the Master/Slave relationship depends upon how the
> device is connected to the IDE cable, i.e., middle or end connector. Thus,
> you're never concerned with jumper settings. It's a real plus when you're
> working on computers.
>
> Art
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I do not see how this is solving the problem. I to cannot see the new drive I
have installed, the device manager recognizes it, but it does not show up in
explorer.

"D.Currie" wrote:

>
> "Art" <noonehere@longone.net> wrote in message
> news:OLrSMS5vEHA.2120@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > Please see my inline comments...
> >
> > "D.Currie" <dmbcurrie.nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:2ul2n9F2992svU1@uni-berlin.de...
> >> I agree that CS is coming back into fashion, but its utility depends on
> >> where the devices are in the case, and how easy it is to move them so
> >> that the cable will reach properly with the configuration you want.
> >> Manufacturers are using CS a lot, but they often have cables that are
> >> designed specifically to fit their case configuration, so there's no
> >> other way to plug things in.
> > I'm not sure I quite understand this. What does cable length have to do
> > with a Cable Select configuration? While it is true that cable length is
> > dependent upon the physical placement of the IDE devices in the computer
> > case, it wouldn't seem that there's any relevancy as to the jumper
> > configuration of these devices.
>
>
> If you're using cable select, the master has to be at the end of the cable,
> as you said. Depending on where the drives are in the case and the
> configuration of the cable, it might not work out to have the drive you want
> as master to be at the end, and for the slave in the middle. For example, if
> you wanted a hard drive as master and CD as slave on the same IDE, but your
> hard drive bays are closer to the mobo and the CDs are way at the top, there
> might not be enough cable length to get the middle portion up to the CD and
> then the end all the way back down to the hard drive. You may have no other
> choice than to have the middle connector on the hard drive and the end
> reaching up to the CD. Never mind about the argument about a hard drive and
> CD on the same cable, it's just an example.
>
> On some computers, and with plenty of cables at the ready with a variety of
> lengths and distances between connectors, it may not be an issue because you
> can probably hunt up a cable that will fit the case configuration or move
> the drives to make it work better. But sometimes you've got to work with
> what you've got, and if the cables don't reach, they don't reach, and if the
> drives can't be moved far, there's nothing you can do about that, either. So
> the master's going to have to be set by jumper so it can be plugged into the
> middle connector and still work as master.
>
> It has nothing to do with the jumpers themselves.
>
> If you were questioning my comment about the oems, if you've looked at some
> of those lately, you'll find that the cables are made to fit exactly where
> they are, with no way to plug them in differently or move the drives very
> far. So if someone unplugs the cables, they've got a real good chance that
> the cables are going to go back the same way again, so there's no chance
> master and slave could change. It might also have something to do with ease
> in assembly for the oem. They can probably order all their drives set to CS
> and not worry about it when the computers are assembled because there's only
> one way it's all going to fit, and there's no need to have anyone change
> jumpers around as part of the process.
>
> With a home-built or custom-build system that uses standard length cables
> and a more configurable case, chances are there are multiple ways those
> cables could get plugged in. So there's greater chance someone could
> inadvertenly switch master and slave just by pluggin in the cables in a
> different order.
>
> I really don't think either way is better than the other, just what works
> best for you. In my experience, people are more likely to unplug cables than
> they are to move jumpers. So setting the drives for master and slave via
> jumper is less likely to get changed accidentally than using the position on
> the cable to determine which is master.
>
>
> >
> >> Personally, I prefer master and slave settings because I know that they
> >> aren't going to change if someone decides to go in there are start
> >> swapping cables. It's hard enough for most people to remember which way
> >> the red stripe is supposed to go, without also having to remember which
> >> of two drives (which look identical to them) belongs on the end of the
> >> cable.
> > But that's precisely the beauty of configuring your devices with Cable
> > Select. Using CS, the Master/Slave relationship depends upon how the
> > device is connected to the IDE cable, i.e., middle or end connector. Thus,
> > you're never concerned with jumper settings. It's a real plus when you're
> > working on computers.
> >
> > Art
> >
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Sorry. The discussion got sidetracked.

Couple things to check:

Does it show up in Disk Management? If so, you can assign a drive letter
there.
Do you have any of the Windows Powetoys installed. There's one that lets you
"hide" drive letters. Maybe that's what happened.
It might be that the drive want the same letter as something else there.
I've seen this happen with things like USB drives that want a letter already
in use. Try changing the DVD drive letter to something else, and see if the
CD reappears.

"MartinIsinger" <MartinIsinger@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:625A4180-F586-4538-AB53-5C732573B329@microsoft.com...
>I do not see how this is solving the problem. I to cannot see the new drive
>I
> have installed, the device manager recognizes it, but it does not show up
> in
> explorer.
>
> "D.Currie" wrote:
>
>>
>> "Art" <noonehere@longone.net> wrote in message
>> news:OLrSMS5vEHA.2120@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> > Please see my inline comments...
>> >
>> > "D.Currie" <dmbcurrie.nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> > news:2ul2n9F2992svU1@uni-berlin.de...
>> >> I agree that CS is coming back into fashion, but its utility depends
>> >> on
>> >> where the devices are in the case, and how easy it is to move them so
>> >> that the cable will reach properly with the configuration you want.
>> >> Manufacturers are using CS a lot, but they often have cables that are
>> >> designed specifically to fit their case configuration, so there's no
>> >> other way to plug things in.
>> > I'm not sure I quite understand this. What does cable length have to do
>> > with a Cable Select configuration? While it is true that cable length
>> > is
>> > dependent upon the physical placement of the IDE devices in the
>> > computer
>> > case, it wouldn't seem that there's any relevancy as to the jumper
>> > configuration of these devices.
>>
>>
>> If you're using cable select, the master has to be at the end of the
>> cable,
>> as you said. Depending on where the drives are in the case and the
>> configuration of the cable, it might not work out to have the drive you
>> want
>> as master to be at the end, and for the slave in the middle. For example,
>> if
>> you wanted a hard drive as master and CD as slave on the same IDE, but
>> your
>> hard drive bays are closer to the mobo and the CDs are way at the top,
>> there
>> might not be enough cable length to get the middle portion up to the CD
>> and
>> then the end all the way back down to the hard drive. You may have no
>> other
>> choice than to have the middle connector on the hard drive and the end
>> reaching up to the CD. Never mind about the argument about a hard drive
>> and
>> CD on the same cable, it's just an example.
>>
>> On some computers, and with plenty of cables at the ready with a variety
>> of
>> lengths and distances between connectors, it may not be an issue because
>> you
>> can probably hunt up a cable that will fit the case configuration or move
>> the drives to make it work better. But sometimes you've got to work with
>> what you've got, and if the cables don't reach, they don't reach, and if
>> the
>> drives can't be moved far, there's nothing you can do about that, either.
>> So
>> the master's going to have to be set by jumper so it can be plugged into
>> the
>> middle connector and still work as master.
>>
>> It has nothing to do with the jumpers themselves.
>>
>> If you were questioning my comment about the oems, if you've looked at
>> some
>> of those lately, you'll find that the cables are made to fit exactly
>> where
>> they are, with no way to plug them in differently or move the drives very
>> far. So if someone unplugs the cables, they've got a real good chance
>> that
>> the cables are going to go back the same way again, so there's no chance
>> master and slave could change. It might also have something to do with
>> ease
>> in assembly for the oem. They can probably order all their drives set to
>> CS
>> and not worry about it when the computers are assembled because there's
>> only
>> one way it's all going to fit, and there's no need to have anyone change
>> jumpers around as part of the process.
>>
>> With a home-built or custom-build system that uses standard length cables
>> and a more configurable case, chances are there are multiple ways those
>> cables could get plugged in. So there's greater chance someone could
>> inadvertenly switch master and slave just by pluggin in the cables in a
>> different order.
>>
>> I really don't think either way is better than the other, just what works
>> best for you. In my experience, people are more likely to unplug cables
>> than
>> they are to move jumpers. So setting the drives for master and slave via
>> jumper is less likely to get changed accidentally than using the position
>> on
>> the cable to determine which is master.
>>
>>
>> >
>> >> Personally, I prefer master and slave settings because I know that
>> >> they
>> >> aren't going to change if someone decides to go in there are start
>> >> swapping cables. It's hard enough for most people to remember which
>> >> way
>> >> the red stripe is supposed to go, without also having to remember
>> >> which
>> >> of two drives (which look identical to them) belongs on the end of the
>> >> cable.
>> > But that's precisely the beauty of configuring your devices with Cable
>> > Select. Using CS, the Master/Slave relationship depends upon how the
>> > device is connected to the IDE cable, i.e., middle or end connector.
>> > Thus,
>> > you're never concerned with jumper settings. It's a real plus when
>> > you're
>> > working on computers.
>> >
>> > Art
>> >
>>
>>
>>
 

Andy

Distinguished
Mar 31, 2004
1,239
0
19,280
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Try running Disk Management and see if it appears there.

On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 16:25:02 -0800, "MartinIsinger"
<MartinIsinger@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>I do not see how this is solving the problem. I to cannot see the new drive I
>have installed, the device manager recognizes it, but it does not show up in
>explorer.
>
>"D.Currie" wrote:
>
>>
>> "Art" <noonehere@longone.net> wrote in message
>> news:OLrSMS5vEHA.2120@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> > Please see my inline comments...
>> >
>> > "D.Currie" <dmbcurrie.nospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> > news:2ul2n9F2992svU1@uni-berlin.de...
>> >> I agree that CS is coming back into fashion, but its utility depends on
>> >> where the devices are in the case, and how easy it is to move them so
>> >> that the cable will reach properly with the configuration you want.
>> >> Manufacturers are using CS a lot, but they often have cables that are
>> >> designed specifically to fit their case configuration, so there's no
>> >> other way to plug things in.
>> > I'm not sure I quite understand this. What does cable length have to do
>> > with a Cable Select configuration? While it is true that cable length is
>> > dependent upon the physical placement of the IDE devices in the computer
>> > case, it wouldn't seem that there's any relevancy as to the jumper
>> > configuration of these devices.
>>
>>
>> If you're using cable select, the master has to be at the end of the cable,
>> as you said. Depending on where the drives are in the case and the
>> configuration of the cable, it might not work out to have the drive you want
>> as master to be at the end, and for the slave in the middle. For example, if
>> you wanted a hard drive as master and CD as slave on the same IDE, but your
>> hard drive bays are closer to the mobo and the CDs are way at the top, there
>> might not be enough cable length to get the middle portion up to the CD and
>> then the end all the way back down to the hard drive. You may have no other
>> choice than to have the middle connector on the hard drive and the end
>> reaching up to the CD. Never mind about the argument about a hard drive and
>> CD on the same cable, it's just an example.
>>
>> On some computers, and with plenty of cables at the ready with a variety of
>> lengths and distances between connectors, it may not be an issue because you
>> can probably hunt up a cable that will fit the case configuration or move
>> the drives to make it work better. But sometimes you've got to work with
>> what you've got, and if the cables don't reach, they don't reach, and if the
>> drives can't be moved far, there's nothing you can do about that, either. So
>> the master's going to have to be set by jumper so it can be plugged into the
>> middle connector and still work as master.
>>
>> It has nothing to do with the jumpers themselves.
>>
>> If you were questioning my comment about the oems, if you've looked at some
>> of those lately, you'll find that the cables are made to fit exactly where
>> they are, with no way to plug them in differently or move the drives very
>> far. So if someone unplugs the cables, they've got a real good chance that
>> the cables are going to go back the same way again, so there's no chance
>> master and slave could change. It might also have something to do with ease
>> in assembly for the oem. They can probably order all their drives set to CS
>> and not worry about it when the computers are assembled because there's only
>> one way it's all going to fit, and there's no need to have anyone change
>> jumpers around as part of the process.
>>
>> With a home-built or custom-build system that uses standard length cables
>> and a more configurable case, chances are there are multiple ways those
>> cables could get plugged in. So there's greater chance someone could
>> inadvertenly switch master and slave just by pluggin in the cables in a
>> different order.
>>
>> I really don't think either way is better than the other, just what works
>> best for you. In my experience, people are more likely to unplug cables than
>> they are to move jumpers. So setting the drives for master and slave via
>> jumper is less likely to get changed accidentally than using the position on
>> the cable to determine which is master.
>>
>>
>> >
>> >> Personally, I prefer master and slave settings because I know that they
>> >> aren't going to change if someone decides to go in there are start
>> >> swapping cables. It's hard enough for most people to remember which way
>> >> the red stripe is supposed to go, without also having to remember which
>> >> of two drives (which look identical to them) belongs on the end of the
>> >> cable.
>> > But that's precisely the beauty of configuring your devices with Cable
>> > Select. Using CS, the Master/Slave relationship depends upon how the
>> > device is connected to the IDE cable, i.e., middle or end connector. Thus,
>> > you're never concerned with jumper settings. It's a real plus when you're
>> > working on computers.
>> >
>> > Art
>> >
>>
>>
>>