Question Where is Windows 10 Installed on an SSD?

ktriebol

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Feb 22, 2013
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Here is a question for the Windows 10 experts. When the Windows 10 OS is installed on an SSD, is it installed on a certain set of blocks that are dedicated for the OS, or is it installed anywhere on the SSD where space is available?
 

ktriebol

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It's interesting to learn that Windows 10 can be installed anywhere. Thank you for enlightening me. I would have thought that it had to be installed on certain blocks.

Since Windows can be installed anywhere, if there are some bad blocks on the SSD, then I would assume those bad blocks are detected during the installation process, and the installation process is managed around the bad blocks. Is this correct?

Next question: After Windows in installed, and some blocks fail in the area where Windows is located, will Windows automatically detect that and re-write Windows around those bad blocks? If not, is a clean installation of Windows necessary?
 

USAFRet

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It's interesting to learn that Windows 10 can be installed anywhere. Thank you for enlightening me. I would have thought that it had to be installed on certain blocks.

Since Windows can be installed anywhere, if there are some bad blocks on the SSD, then I would assume those bad blocks are detected during the installation process, and the installation process is managed around the bad blocks. Is this correct?

Next question: After Windows in installed, and some blocks fail in the area where Windows is located, will Windows automatically detect that and re-write Windows around those bad blocks? If not, is a clean installation of Windows necessary?
Well, bad blocks or sectors on a drive is a whole different thing.
And SSD's work a LOT different than HDD's.

In an SSD, the drive firmware moves data around all the time, for wear leveling. Windows doesn't have a lot to do with it.
As certain cells get "used up", the drive simply does not use those anymore. No matter what data is there or used to be there. Could be the OS, could be parts of a game, could be parts of the last photo shoot you did.

And when we say "anywhere", you don't get to 'choose' where.
 

ktriebol

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Well, bad blocks or sectors on a drive is a whole different thing.
And SSD's work a LOT different than HDD's.

In an SSD, the drive firmware moves data around all the time, for wear leveling. Windows doesn't have a lot to do with it.
As certain cells get "used up", the drive simply does not use those anymore. No matter what data is there or used to be there. Could be the OS, could be parts of a game, could be parts of the last photo shoot you did.

And when we say "anywhere", you don't get to 'choose' where.
I am familiar with wear leveling, but if a block in an SSD goes bad that is in the area of your Windows installation, what happens? It seems to me that Windows would be corrupt at that point. Does Windows automatically repair itself somehow, or do you have to re-install Windows?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
The drive will hopefully preemptively move data from a cell that is dying, to some other cell.
Generally speaking, a cell in an SSD goes to read only as it reaches it limit. The drive firmware will move that data to a fully functioning cell.

If it actually goes "bad" all of a sudden, there may be no warning, recovery, or "fix".

I had an SSD go bad around christmas. No warning, no read only...just "dead".
960GB SanDisk. What happened to it? Don't know, and mostly don't care.
That is what warranty and personal backups are for.
 

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