News Where to buy a TPM 2.0 for Windows 11

DexSK

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Oct 17, 2020
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I'm writing this maybe for the 20th time already. The TPM as in a physical chip is not a requirement per se. Any CPU/chipset that would need a physical TPM is too old to meet the CPU requirement of Windows 11. With all the CPUs on the compatibility list there is a BIOS/chipset setting called PTT (blue team) or fTPM (red team). If you enable that and Secure Boot, you don't need a physical TPM to install and run it.
 
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Apr 1, 2020
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It's going to take Microsoft a lot longer than 22H1 to fix all of Windows 11's issues. It took Microsoft, in my opinion, 4 years to get Windows 10 to a state where you didn't have to worry about updates bricking the machine, files and programs disappearing, or otherwise causing issues, with 1909. Considering the amount of change for change sake in Windows 11 they're going to have to either undo or give the option to undo, such as what was presented in TH's Windows 11 issues article yesterday, I can't see 6 months or even 1 year being long enough to polish it.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
"You never know, it could give Microsoft time to fix some of the 11 worst features of Windows 11. "

This right here. I don't have any plans to even consider upgrading to Windows 11, until the first equivalent of SP1 is released.
no weather widget is a good thing really, tbh I forget I even have widgets until I read articles like this. Most of those things can be ignored/or gotten used to. Win 11 so close to 10 I always forget I have been on it for 2 months or more now.

Changing defaults needs an easier way, they really want people using Edge (had to look its name up, i don't use it). If you update from win 10 it should remmeber what defaults you use, but that would be too easy.

I'm writing this maybe for the 20th time already. The TPM as in a physical chip is not a requirement per se. Any CPU/chipset that would need a physical TPM is too old to meet the CPU requirement of Windows 11. With all the CPUs on the compatibility list there is a BIOS/chipset setting called PTT (blue team) or fTPM (red team). If you enable that and Secure Boot, you don't need a physical TPM to install and run it.

Yeah, you don't need to buy a TPM if your PC has PTT or fTPM in bios. I wish people would stop spreading that misinfo

Next version update for win 11 is in 1 year, no 6 monthly updates, lets them make actual changes and perhaps schedule will work as planned

Secure boot must be needed for clean installs as I have 11 installed and secure boot is still off

I have been waiting for something to happen. fTPM is enabled.
 
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GenericUser

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One of the more frustrating Windows 11 hardware requirements is the potential need for a Trusted Platform Module 2.0 (TPM). Here’s a WvoRCGkA58c76dtBDtD7m3e on where to buy one.
Is this some sort sort of hip new lingo I'm not aware of?

"Psst, I got the WvoRCGkA58c76dtBDtD7m3e on where to score some TPMs."
 
Jul 28, 2021
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I'm writing this maybe for the 20th time already. The TPM as in a physical chip is not a requirement per se. Any CPU/chipset that would need a physical TPM is too old to meet the CPU requirement of Windows 11. With all the CPUs on the compatibility list there is a BIOS/chipset setting called PTT (blue team) or fTPM (red team). If you enable that and Secure Boot, you don't need a physical TPM to install and run it.
I have pretty much given up explaining this to people. Even so called technical people and writers constantly get it wrong. It is simple really. If you have a CPU that is officially supported then you HAVE a TPM, be it physical or CPU based, no ifs buts or maybes and even many older unsupported CPU's like 6th gen Intel also have it. I wish MS or somewhere like Toms would just publish a list of the CPU's and what TPM they have included. It seems even after many months many are still looking to buy a TPM when they don't need one.
 
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Jan 15, 2021
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kinda curious if like gen2 intel will be able to pass tpm requirement using this?
what is the port to have this plugged in?
also is it possible in the future this TPM using USB2 connection? if yes then we might be able to used a lot older pc and still comply
 

Pirx73

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I have a Gen4 Core i7 and i got TPM 2.0 module for my Gigabyte GA-Z97X-UD3H motherboard.
One weirdness though - BIOS does not support the module, You have to write a ticket to Gigabyte support so they can supply you with special BIOS including TPM support.
None of the BIOSes on their web page for my motherboard had it.
Of course i still have to bypass CPU requirement though.
 

escksu

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Aug 8, 2019
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I'm writing this maybe for the 20th time already. The TPM as in a physical chip is not a requirement per se. Any CPU/chipset that would need a physical TPM is too old to meet the CPU requirement of Windows 11. With all the CPUs on the compatibility list there is a BIOS/chipset setting called PTT (blue team) or fTPM (red team). If you enable that and Secure Boot, you don't need a physical TPM to install and run it.
Learn to read the whole article instead of just the title. The article already mentioned what you have posted here.
 

DexSK

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Oct 17, 2020
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Learn to read the whole article instead of just the title. The article already mentioned what you have posted here.
It does mention both, but then it still goes on about buying a TPM. No need to bother, because any CPU where PTT or fTPM is not included, thus necessitating a physical TPM, will not be compatible anyway.
 

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