[SOLVED] Which components can I replace?

nbartolo7

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Hello,

I need some help. I want to upgrade my PC but am not sure which components I can safely switch without causing any issues to my system and to be able to boot to my desktop as usual.

I only want to switch CPU, Motherboard, and RAM. Not GPU and not storage drive. Am I good to go? Or will RAM and motherboard replacement cause some issues?

Thanks.
 

USAFRet

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For this component swap, you'll be doing a FULL reinstall of Windows, and all your applications, drivers...everything.

What you want to 'back up' is...

Any and all personal files
Document all your username/passwords
Export all the settings/profiles of your browsers
Know in advance what applications you'll be reinstalling, and save whatever install files are needed
Download all the drivers needed for your hardware.

Save all this on some other easily accessible storage device.
Not windows backup, or Acronis.
You want just the bare files, in their native condition.
 

geofelt

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Yes, changing to a new motherboard, you SHOULD install a clean new copy of windows.
Particularly if you are changing from intel to amd or vice versa.

If reinstalling apps and settings is a pain or not possible, you can try to boot with your old windows C drive. If you can boot, then install the new motherboard and intel drivers.
Protect yourself first.
I have been successful with a handful of such upgrades, intel to intel.
 
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nbartolo7

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Tabs for internet browsers are stored in your user profile on storage device (HDD or SSD).
When you reinstall windows, all information on OS drive gets cleared. No more stored tabs for internet browsers.
Ok thanks. Interesting. The only way to keep my tabs or favorites is to create an account on my browser?
 

nbartolo7

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Yes, changing to a new motherboard, you SHOULD install a clean new copy of windows.
Particularly if you are changing from intel to amd or vice versa.

If reinstalling apps and settings is a pain or not possible, you can try to boot with your old windows C drive. If you can boot, then install the new motherboard and intel drivers.
Protect yourself first.
I have been successful with a handful of such upgrades, intel to intel.
Thank you. I see... So, my choices are ?

  1. backing up my C: drive (which method do you recommend?), wipe it, and install fresh windows on it? How do I then recover my backup?
  2. Purchase a new drive so that I don't have to wipe this one out, and use this one as a secondary drive in the new build?
 
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nbartolo7

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All the major browsers have en export/import feature.
Specific procedures differ, so investigate for your browsers.
You seem to know a lot about backups since even your signature is about that. Would you be so kind to tell me :

1. Which backup method should I choose to do this motherboard swap? Does it matter? Are they all the same? I currently have a cloud company called Backblaze taking care of that, but should I use Acronis or a secondary physical hard-drive to backup my files using Windows' built-in file history method? I also heard about cloning. Is that also a backup or something entirely different. Watched some videos on it but still don't get it.

2. Where will I find my backup to restore it, once on my "new motherboard" PC? Will the backup put my desktop files exactly where they were in my previous system? Will Windows settings be as I left them, or will I have to do everything again? Office 365 also, all settings gone out the window?

Many thanks in advance.
 

USAFRet

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For this component swap, you'll be doing a FULL reinstall of Windows, and all your applications, drivers...everything.

What you want to 'back up' is...

Any and all personal files
Document all your username/passwords
Export all the settings/profiles of your browsers
Know in advance what applications you'll be reinstalling, and save whatever install files are needed
Download all the drivers needed for your hardware.

Save all this on some other easily accessible storage device.
Not windows backup, or Acronis.
You want just the bare files, in their native condition.
 

nbartolo7

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Sep 4, 2017
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For this component swap, you'll be doing a FULL reinstall of Windows, and all your applications, drivers...everything.

What you want to 'back up' is...

Any and all personal files
Document all your username/passwords
Export all the settings/profiles of your browsers
Know in advance what applications you'll be reinstalling, and save whatever install files are needed
Download all the drivers needed for your hardware.

Save all this on some other easily accessible storage device.
Not windows backup, or Acronis.
You want just the bare files, in their native condition.
Ok, so cloning is a bad idea? It might be buggy?
 

geofelt

Titan
When I have upgraded without a new windows install, I first cloned my C drive to a samsung ssd using their ssd migration app:
The ssd needs to be large enough to hold at least the used portion of the original C drive. Usually, I added some extra capacity.
I removed the original C drive which is unchanged and set it aside in case.

I used the cloned ssd to try to boot with the new motherboard.
If it booted, I then installed the new motherboard drivers and tested.
My success in half a dozen upgrades has come from intel to intel upgrades.
I suspect that intel to amd or vice versa may not be as successful.
 

hang-the-9

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Ok, so cloning is a bad idea? It might be buggy?
You did not list your current parts, or why you were looking to upgrade and to what parts. There is really no way to answer your question properly without more info from you. In many cases the need to upgrade is not warranted by the reason why and a clean Windows setup or drive swap to an SSD will do the trick.
 

nbartolo7

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You want just the bare files, in their native condition.
What does that mean? Never heard those terms before. Neither has my Backblaze tech support guy. He asked me to ask you what you meant by bare and native.

And also, what do you mean when you say:
Know in advance what applications you'll be reinstalling, and save whatever install files are needed
Why do I need those files? Won't I just reinstall the programs I want in the new system?
 

nbartolo7

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What is your current storage?
Do you have an SSD?

If not, then get one, perform clean install of windows on it and move user data from your old storage drive to new SSD.
You wouldn't have to worry about backing up/restoring because your old drive stays intact. All data can be recovered from it.
How do I move user data from old storage to new one? Just copy and paste? Do I connect old storage as secondary internal sata drive?
 

nbartolo7

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What you want to 'back up' is...

Any and all personal files
Document all your username/passwords
Export all the settings/profiles of your browsers
Know in advance what applications you'll be reinstalling, and save whatever install files are needed
Download all the drivers needed for your hardware.
Quick question. Still don't know why you recommend backing up drivers and install files. Can't those all be found again on the internet?
 

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