Question Which cooler take for 5820k + X99 Deluxe MB ?

peaceduke

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Hi !

I want to buy not expensive air cooler for 5820k (will overclock maximum +400-500mhz)
Some coolers have only 2011 socket support (at least that's how they type on a box), but on forums many says 2011 socket coolers work with 2011 v3 sockets
in my case , will "CoolerMaster Hyper 212 Evo" fit X99 Deluxe (5820k inside) without problems ?

if that above cooler not going to fit , maybe you can advice any other cooler solution.

Best Regards !



 

Karadjgne

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You'll need to start over in your thinking and assumptions. Sorry.

The 2011/3 series was Enthusiast level equipment, not the more budget oriented consumer level. Nothing about that level of performance was cheap.

Your cpu is 140w TDP. That means at stock settings with No Turbo and No hyperthreading, you could expect @ 140w of heat. The CM hyper212 is a 140w cooler. Any of those budget coolers is roughly equitable wattage. Expect that once you enable turbo and Hyperthreading, you'll be quite far north of 140w and much closer to 200w, add OC and you'll be higher still.

The most common cooling for a 2011/3 was AIO as it's the only cooling that didn't interfere with the left side 4 ram slots on those boards or the 1st/2nd slot on the right side after putting on a sizable aircooler.

With the 2011 or 2011-3 mobo's and cpus, go big or go home was the motto, because the only thing you'll get from the budget coolers is extreme high temps.
 

Viking2121

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You'll need to start over in your thinking and assumptions. Sorry.

The 2011/3 series was Enthusiast level equipment, not the more budget oriented consumer level. Nothing about that level of performance was cheap.

Your cpu is 140w TDP. That means at stock settings with No Turbo and No hyperthreading, you could expect @ 140w of heat. The CM hyper212 is a 140w cooler. Any of those budget coolers is roughly equitable wattage. Expect that once you enable turbo and Hyperthreading, you'll be quite far north of 140w and much closer to 200w, add OC and you'll be higher still.

The most common cooling for a 2011/3 was AIO as it's the only cooling that didn't interfere with the left side 4 ram slots on those boards or the 1st/2nd slot on the right side after putting on a sizable aircooler.

With the 2011 or 2011-3 mobo's and cpus, go big or go home was the motto, because the only thing you'll get from the budget coolers is extreme high temps.
Well since x99 is fairly dated in terms of PC hardware, they are pretty affordable if you look around. Also the hyper 212 evo will cool the chip just fine, it can also overclock a tad with it, though I would not recommend it, I would also not recommend an AIO for reliable sake, its just not needed for a 5820k to keep it cool anyways and the price have gone way up and I would not get an used AIO.

Now my 5960x, I do have a hyper 212 sitting on it now, it keeps it below 70c and its not even screwed down so not much mounting pressure, its my old system and I use it for a test bench at the moment, Was cooled with a Noctua nh-d15 but sold that and plopped the 212 on it for the time being that was on an AMD FX board, the chip consumes much more power at stock than the 5820k, he'll be fine at stock, even in really hot room.
 
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Karadjgne

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When does it keep it below 70°C? At idle? Seriously, your cpu with p95 small fft will pull over 160w, Op's about 20w less with just a 4GHz OC at 1.1v, which isn't that much of a stretch, but you'd still be looking at temps well over 90 with a 140w cooler. Figure on high cpu games like the Battlefield series, Witcher 3, CoD etc will be topping 70 and headed for 80°C. Don't try rendering or heavy editing usage, that's not much easier on a cpu than Prime95 is.

Not recommend an AIO for 'reliabile sake' ??? Where'd you get that idea? YouTube? So I'd assume you'd be totally against a full custom loop then, even though they were widely used over both air and aio for the x99 or other enthusiast boards. My SFF ITX is custom loop. I ran an nzxt X61 for over 6 straight years, 24/7, moved it around the case multiple times and only retired it because the fans gave out.

I've had Noctua with leaky heatpipes, Phanteks with warped base plate, CoolerMaster with heatpipes seperated from the base, Raijintek with unwelded fins, warped motherboards, cracked motherboards, cpu/ram errors galore and more DOA fans than I care to mention, all from aircoolers. EVERYTHING has a failure rate, and you'll not see anyone complain about an aio still running after 3 years, but let one leak and it's on a hundred websites and went viral after 4 minutes.
 

peaceduke

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Karadjgne
you're overexadurating situation with your "only AIO"
hyper 212 evo would do the good job, I found it 40$.
But I took even better aircooler noctua U14S for 63$ which will do amazing job.
not bad price for todays situation.
my AIO is 6 years old and most likely soon it will cause a leak .
only problem that might still be, is some are saying horizontal orientation is not as good for that cooler , mine is coolermaster HAF XB (which is horizontal).
hope not going to produce strange sounds.
 
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Karadjgne

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If your aio is 6 years old it's not going to leak now. Not unless you do something stupid like torque the fittings. Right now at 6 years old an aio is more susceptible to the level of the liquid being too low or too viscous to allow the pump to circulate the coolant easily. Those pumps back then would be looking at a lifespan of @ 40,000 hours ±, which is 4.7 years of 24hrs a day, 352 days a year, continuous use at 100% output. If you just run it for 8 hrs a day, 5 days a week, that's just over 19 years possibly.

Horizontal or vertical makes no difference. It's a sealed, closed loop cooler. Traditionally the rad was horizontal on the top of the case, recent trends have changed that to vertical at the front for many larger rads.

The Noctua U14S is a 180-200w cooler with a highly effective fan and heatsink design. So yes, it's going to well outperform a budget 140w hyper212 on a cpu that can hit 140w.
 
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Viking2121

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When does it keep it below 70°C? At idle? Seriously, your cpu with p95 small fft will pull over 160w, Op's about 20w less with just a 4GHz OC at 1.1v, which isn't that much of a stretch, but you'd still be looking at temps well over 90 with a 140w cooler. Figure on high cpu games like the Battlefield series, Witcher 3, CoD etc will be topping 70 and headed for 80°C. Don't try rendering or heavy editing usage, that's not much easier on a cpu than Prime95 is.

Not recommend an AIO for 'reliabile sake' ??? Where'd you get that idea? YouTube? So I'd assume you'd be totally against a full custom loop then, even though they were widely used over both air and aio for the x99 or other enthusiast boards. My SFF ITX is custom loop. I ran an nzxt X61 for over 6 straight years, 24/7, moved it around the case multiple times and only retired it because the fans gave out.

I've had Noctua with leaky heatpipes, Phanteks with warped base plate, CoolerMaster with heatpipes seperated from the base, Raijintek with unwelded fins, warped motherboards, cracked motherboards, cpu/ram errors galore and more DOA fans than I care to mention, all from aircoolers. EVERYTHING has a failure rate, and you'll not see anyone complain about an aio still running after 3 years, but let one leak and it's on a hundred websites and went viral after 4 minutes.
This may blow your mind, but the 5820k commonly runs cooler than the 4790k, shocker right? Well Intel kinda screwed up on the 4790k and the IHS and the paste and yeah, why people delid them, 5820k with 2 more cores a bigger IHS, a lower vcore a soldered IHS and got your self a cooling running chip, I bet you would change you mind if this guy had a 4790k.

Seriously, the hyper 212 will keep the 5820k cool, Don't believe me? Google it, toms hardware does have a few topics with this same question, and they all ended up with solid results.

Again I would not recommend an AIO, Its my option, and I will stick by it, I've had many AIO coolers while most of them were decent, you have more points of failure, and 1 of them points could destroy the system, rare, but its there.

And yeah, I love custom water cooling, but that is not the question here, so I do not recommend it for Longevity reason and reliability reasons.
 

Karadjgne

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I dunno, der8aur is loving the fact Intel swapped to TIM with Ivy-Bridge.

And yes, of course anything with more moving parts is more subject to possible failure, just doesn't mean it Is. Just that the chances are greater. Corsair aio failure rate is less than 1% last time I checked, and thats not just leaks, that's doa pumps, pumps failing during warranty, items returned during warranty period (broken or not doesn't matter). Many bought an aio thinking they needed one for OC, heard about leaks, freaked out and returned the item, but claimed it didn't work in order not to get penalized for restock/shipping fees. All part of that less than 1% failure rate.

Actual leaks is probably closer to 0.1%. Which is miniscule compared to the 20+% failure rates of the Thermaltake TR2 psus or many motherboards.

I'm not saying your opinion is wrong, you have every right to it, but saying you'd not recommend an aio for reliable sake because they leak isn't so much an opinion as it is claimed as a fact. You might as well state that fan motors burn out, so you'd recommend going totally fanless, or don't use a power supply at all because they blow up and will burn your house down (yes, that's actually fact, has happened multiple times, as well as causing a few deaths).

AIO's do leak. A miniscule % do. Not all, and most of the leaks are caused by the installation process, only a tiny fraction are due to manufacturer defects. That's fact.

Me, I'm quite alright with a less than 1% chance of leaks, after all I haven't yet won the lottery either.
 

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