[SOLVED] which cpu water cooling could i use for a ryzen 5 2600 with oc ?

May 13, 2019
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i will have a 5 2600 gpu
but i dont know what cooler to put im thinking to oc.

my options were the artic freezer 34 duo
and that but i want more options or one more efficient please help
 
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Karadjgne

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That kinda depends on the OC you are aiming for.

The Arctic freezer isn't bad, it's a little better than the stock cooler. However, the Wraith is a decent cooler for stock, and will handle a mild OC with out issue. So if you are just looking for a decent mild OC, then the Arctic is fine, if you want something more extreme, you'll need bigger. And most commonly bigger means having a case that will fit a taller cooler.

So there's certain things needed.

What case. What location. What budget.
 
May 13, 2019
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That kinda depends on the OC you are aiming for.

The Arctic freezer isn't bad, it's a little better than the stock cooler. However, the Wraith is a decent cooler for stock, and will handle a mild OC with out issue. So if you are just looking for a decent mild OC, then the Arctic is fine, if you want something more extreme, you'll need bigger. And most commonly bigger means having a case that will fit a taller cooler.

So there's certain things needed.

What case. What location. What budget.
ok in the case i wont oc it can i just have the stock cooler and the temperatures will be fine? like playing fortnite or csgo for example.
 

DavidM012

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Here's an easy way to get a rundown of some products. https://pcpartpicker.com/products/cpu-cooler/#m=79&sort=price&page=1

The scythe fuma rev b benches like the noctua nh-d15. Conflicting reviews on the noise level of the fuma fans but at 150mm it fits most atx mid chassis where the noctua requires 165mm clearance. And at $46 it's only a trifle more than a 4 pipe cooler. Ok so you can get some that are $20 but nothing that will overkill the cooling soln. in quite the same way. it should completely remove temperature as a limiting factor on your cpu even fully overclocked.

The mugen and the ninja are more silent and should do a similar job.

These are air coolers without any of the drawbacks of an aio loop which is simply that in time when the pump fails the whole unit needs replacing. Some have 5 yr warranties but the lump of metal heatsink only has the fan as a moving part which is much easier to replace.

If you're thinking, 5 or 10years ahead, the lump of metal will be performing the same in 20years so, in terms of cents per week it's cheaper. So long as socket compatibility is maintained with mounting mechanisms, probly be able to re-use it on future cpu's that will probably be even more thermally efficient.

Both the aio and air coolers are affordable but, on ryzen, practically any air cooler will be ok, and the larger 6 pipe air coolers will be more than enough and keep the cpu cooler for longer on high load apps. I'd recommend spending a bit of time browsing the market, maybe looking at alternative products, & a couple of reviews of each item you might like, who knows, sometimes you can get repacked items at a knock down price, so long as it's a decent retailer. You need to know what to look for so the only way is to brush up a bit on cooler specifications.
 

Karadjgne

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Airflow. That'll be important. The closer the cooler is in ability to what the cpu can put out, the more important good airflow is.

The giant NH-D15 is so large that it'll almost work passively, so even with mediocre airflow it's still going to get decent temps. The stock Wraith is very decent for a stock cooler, better than many aftermarket budget coolers, but it's not far above what the cpu can do, so with mediocre air flow, it'll be running warm, considerably warmer than the NH-D15.

Is it enough for Fortnite? Yep. Not a problem. But thats whether the cpu will do it and not be in throttle temps. Whether it's too hot for you or not is a different story.

Gaming with the cpu @ 70ish°C is absolutely fine. But, 2 things, 1) the cooler will be running high rpm, and somewhat loud (it's just noise, not hurting the cpu at all) and 2) most ppl have a very strong preference (they don't even know why!) for the absolute lowest temps they can, with a silent cooler.

So while the cpu is happy with the stock cooler, only you can decide if it's something you can live with, or want to replace.
 

DavidM012

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for me it depends on the ambient temps if you have a/c and things stay at around 20c/68f then you prolly won't notice any problem so long as you have a cooler attached and the fan is spinning even if it's not a hyper efficient one. The problem is the few days of the year when ambient temps could hit 38c or something, those are the days when maybe your overclock trips the thermal shutdown protection because, higher ambient temps increases your idle temps and load temps are subsequently higher. The local air temps rise as the heatsink is putting all the 180ish watts of heat on a overclocked cpu into the near air. Absent decent ventilation and the air temps will rise as well so things can get a little toasty.

When you're starting at 20c it looks like you have a lot of thermal margin but that can get eaten up by a few factors quite quickly in some conditions. Though ryzen is generally better at everything including temps. than the last generation of cpu's and also tougher, why not stay cool. We don't have any clear independent information about what silicon is supposed to handle for how long but there is some indication that some systems running on the margins for a long time close to the thermal limits, fail, whether it's the board or cpu, and sometimes it's the one day when things are a bit out of shape, that's the day the system goes down when otherwise it might have been ok.

Ryzen is new better performing and tougher maybe it doesn't have the problems of previous gen cpu's & systems but are we in the position to test it to failure not really so there's a bit of an unknown quantity there and there is past experience of things going wrong close to the margins which may or may not be applicable.

I read about the noctua nh-d15's passive cooling ability, but, the scythe is more compact and half the price from some outlets and with the fans going it won't let you down and if it's too noisy, you can get silent ones to replace them and it would still be cheaper than the nh-d15 and still keep pace with it's cooling power.

And for me, as a matter of preference, last time I had a giant metal heatsink on a pentium 4 I hated it because it practically filled up the case and was a pain to simply plug things into the board, it made things more awkward but ultimately, what are we supposed to know about heat and silicon, if you can stay cooler, why not?
 
May 19, 2019
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I often wonder why people overclock, I run a I7-7700k, with 16GB Ram, with a Vega 64, and can play any game I want, I don't play in 4k, I do stream and my stream pc is a Ryzen 7 2700, 16GB Ram, Rtx 590 and that thing screams as well without overclocking for gaming. I play Pubg, Escape from Tarkov, on any of those pc with great frame rates stock with no overclocking, so why put the extra wear and tear on your equipment unless you have money to replace anything if It goes wrong.
 

DavidM012

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Overclocking doesn't make a significant difference in gaming in many of the benchmarks I've seen but, sometimes a cheaper cpu overclocked will start to keep pace with a more expensive one at default, so you effectively get the next tier of cpu for a few $ less and it doesn't add any wear and tear if the cooler is adequate. Some people run their overclock for more than 5 years all the year round with no ill effects.

There are a lot of variables that affect ambient conditions and temps and it's the peak load that really stresses the system rather than the average people have different shaped rooms and different kinds of ventilation, different hardware, neat cable management or not, good or poor airflow, but the main factor is how much heat the cooler can dissipate. Overclocking isn't a necessity, you can get a bit more out of the cpu, one of those things. If you can, do. It does necessitate the precaution of a decent psu and cooler, things are nice to have anyway and not all that exorbitantly expensive.

It has turned out even on some high end systems that overclocking the cpu doesn't make a huge difference of say 4fps or something, and overclocking the gpu is more risky, and custom cooling one more difficult, but there is a bit of competition in the oc world with peeps vying for the 1 spot with their overclock. If you aren't comfortable overclocking, don't. I don't overclock my gpu at the moment 'cos I'm not finding any good documentation, the manufacturer software doesn't work and I'd have to use msi afterburner, looked at it and thought, nope dunno what it does.

Yes I've seen it undervolted and overclocked but did I get exactly what they was doing precisely with what buttons in what order and why, no, so I didn't mess with it.

https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/17039161

Don't have any major bottlenecks in my system beyond the limitations of the actual last gen hardware, storage hdd's are a bit slow but bearable. And I'm just getting round to pushing the overclock up to 4.7ghz. 4.3 on all cores is faster than the turbo of 4.2 on one core which is a bit of an improvement. Will I rev the motor as high as I can, on the day when I've built another pc and don't have to rely on it as my primary system.

Here's a sample of my temps playing fallout 4 at 1600x1200 ultra detail

https://ibb.co/87X58F7

temp1 cpu temp idle at 34c (sort of idle alt tabbed with the game in the background)min 27c load 38c. Mobo temp 30c idle 31c load. Did I spend a bit more time and effort and money on a custom cooling sol'n yes, is there a problem with those temps, no. It's a long way from the margins where things look unclear and unsafe, nowhere near running hot it's perfect. Do I worry about airflow, no, I don't even have the side panels on my pc, only a 120mm fan huffing on the vrm heatsink to replace the airflow from an air cooler.

Would an air cooler do the same job, not quite but pretty close. But my loop isn't a standard aio. It's a thing I jury rigged together using non standard parts, for fun.

All looks fabulous at a cool ambient of 21c but on a hot day it will find it's limits at the highest overclock. The Thing cooler on a ryzen should be perfect. All I need now when I upgrade is to buy a $20 water block because of socket compatiblity. Would I say you should build a The Thing cooler well no it's a lot of work custom water cooling builds have their risks you need a bit of savvy to do it but I wouldn't say it's impossible or not do-able either. and it certainly isn't dying from temperature.

add 18c for a hot day raising idle temps more and it starts to get near the recommended 55c limit for fx. Add a bit for local air temp rises due to heat transfer and it gets close on the margins. Ryzen has a higher limit but throttles around 70c so should be able to handle a hot day like the hottest days of the year can be, without overheating, with a good cooler. The weakest link is is the peak load which is only happening like less than 1% of the time.
 
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Karadjgne

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Outside case ambient temps don't really affect load temps, only idle temps.

Outside ambient affects case temps, the cpu uses case air as it's ambient base. A cpu will usually run about 6-10°C above outside ambient. Case temps will be a few °C hotter than outside ambient. Once you apply a sufficient load, it'll be upto the efficiency of the cooler that is using the now warmer case temps to decide cpu temp.

The intake/exhaust airflow will keep an idle case at low temps, but high load usage won't let the airflow replace the temp inside as fast as the cpu/gpu coolers can fill it. So case temps will climb to a ceiling far above outside ambient.

So gaming with a cpu/gpu at 55/60, case temps will be closer to 50, whether or not outside ambient is 18 or 38. The more efficient the cooler, the lower the cpu temp, but it'll still put the same wattage heat output. A cpu at 160w is still putting out @ 160w of heat, whether the cpu is at 55°C or 70°C. It's that heat output that overrides outside ambient temps, not the actual temp of the cpu.

At idle, that 160w OC is only putting out 30w of heat, not enough to change the case temp that's affected by outside ambient.
 

DavidM012

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I'm only on about how my fx 4350 overclocked at 4.9ghz shut down on a hot day when it was an unusual of heatwave 38c, and I could feel the heat from the cooler washing over me. It didn't take any discernable thermal damage but there was nothing I could do to bring down the temps, windows were open, desk fan was on, and I still had turn down the overclock. but I've seen one or two examples of someone running an fx with an inadequate cooler in a hot climate and after a week or so of 62c cpu temps it din't wanna play anymore. It was exactly on the recommended limit for an fx, and the user had switched the cooler from an aio because the pump was failing, to a gamma max. So what was going on there was an extended time of running hot in really hot weather.

I think it can be that you overload the cpu thermally in some conditions but it would all have to be quite harsh temps for it to happen. All the info says that the amd cooler is ok for ryzen at default speeds, and the overclock can catch up with the next tier of cpu, and if you already have a larger cooler from another previous build, you can capitalise on that but, in the end there aren't really any free mhz there's a premium to be paid on the psu and cooler to support overclocking, that isn't all that exorbitant whether you get a 1600 to run after a 2600 or a 2600 to run after a 2700. Seen some examples of ryzens running at 70c on the amd cooler which is ok for it but I don't think it leaves any room for overclocking.

It would be preferable to run the higher tier cpu at default than the lower tier overclocked probably, but not really a problem to overclock either, with a good cooler. A quality psu is something you'll always want anyway and it's pretty safe to say that if you stay far from the recommended temp. limits you'll never have a temp. problem. If you run on the margins all the time then maybe one or two high temp. situations eventually does for the cpu.
 
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