Question Which desktop of any size (tower, mini-tower, small form-factor, etc) have M.2 slots built in?

Koesherbacon

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Sep 13, 2019
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Hello there, I'm hoping some of you can help me out here. I’m posting this question in a few different places so you might have already encountered it. Nevertheless, I still would love some input on desktop computers can utilize one or more internal standard SATA SSDs in addition to one or more M.2 SSDs.

My laptop has finally 'given up the ghost' so to speak. For a very long time now, this laptop has functioned exactly as a desktop would:
• Connected to a much larger monitor
• Lid closed and screen turned off
• External mouse and keyboard
• And so on


I know there are inexpensive kits out there that'll convert a 2.5" laptop SSD into a 3.5" desktop SSD for me, so my good ol' fashion laptop-size SSD shouldn't be any problem whatsoever in terms of transfering from my non-working laptop into a desktop. That said, I am quite worried that I might find what looks to be a great deal but lacks an internal M.2 slot for either my older but still reliable 1TiB NVMe or a newly purchased 1TiB SATA SSD . I kind of regret buying the new SATA model since my laptop seems to have bitten the dust only about a month after purchasing and installing it.

I use Linux exclusively so disk partitioning is important to me. Whichever type of my M.2 SSDs that's installed on desktop does not make much a difference to me because I'll just pop the other on into a USB-C external enclosure. Whichever one ends up inside the new computer will end up being partitioned so the first partition will house my /, /boot. /root, /usr, /etc, and other essential root-filesystem directories. That first partition is followed by a much larger partition housing my /home. And, finally a 3rd partition that's my Swap. The other 2.5" SATA SSD installed will continue to function as extra storage in addition to my /home directory. I use this partition scheme so that if something causes my Linux Distro to have a major problem while continuing to learn about Linux as a whole, I don't lose any of my most important files. A Linux Distro can be removed, reinstalled, or tossed away in order to install a new one while the /home directory remains the same.

So anyway, I just really don't want order a new computer without making absolutely certain that I will be able to utilize both an internal SATA SSD as well as an internal M.2 SATA/NVMe SSD at the same time.

I also want to make sure that whatever ends up being suggested won't be too expensive. I don't play any games, so I don't need a gaming rig, all I need is a reliable desktop that I can use to continuing to learn about coding as well as Linux. I'm just looking for a computer that isn't too expensive and will be able to perform exactly as I'm hoping.

So, can anybody recommend some desktops for me that will fit the criteria above?

I hope you and your families are all staying healthy during this COVID-19 epidemic! This is obviously a very difficult time for everybody, so thanks so much for taking a look at my questions and providing me with any advice you can give!
 

USAFRet

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Most current motherboards have 1 or 2 M.2 ports.
Some PCIe and SATA, some one or the other.

On some boards, use of an M.2 port may disable one or more SATA ports. But they would have others that are NOT disabled.
 

Koesherbacon

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Sep 13, 2019
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So, in a nutshell, most modern desktops, towers, mini-towers, and so forth will probably have M.2 slots available as well as SATA for my 2.5" drives to work with a converter (if even necessary). Does that sound accurate, USARet?
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
131,327
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So, in a nutshell, most modern desktops, towers, mini-towers, and so forth will probably have M.2 slots available as well as SATA for my 2.5" drives to work with a converter (if even necessary). Does that sound accurate, USARet?
Yes.
Highly unlikely a "converter" would be necessary for any 2.5" drives you have. The motherboard WILL have regular SATA ports for those.

And most cases have dedicated mount points for 2.5" drives.
 

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