Which is the best memory?

G

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I was curious to know others opinions on the best RAM to buy. I've read that
Corsair and Kingston are good as well as Viking.
 

bar

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These 3rd party companies buy the chips and assemble them onto boards; they
do not manufacture the chips.

Chip makers include Intel, Motorola, Samsung, and Mitsubishi: any or all of
these companies supply to the assemblers. They can also supply assembled
memory modules.

Thus one begs to ask which is better? The reality is that it is much of a
muchness...not quite the same as asking if Ford or GM is a better car.

I once distributed memory for one of these manufacturers and they even buy
from each other and resll the modules.

So for memory..in 20 years in the business, I have not yet come across a
memory module that has failed once installed: no matter where the product was
assembled. Occasionally one may have a faulty manufactured module and then
one needs to be sure that the RMA policy is good and that a replacement unit
will be given NOW.

What you need to do is make sure that whatever you buy, it is compatible
with the existing modules ...exact detailled specifications. Type / Speed
etc. If you have a new build, then it won't be a problem.



"Jack Carlson" wrote:

> I was curious to know others opinions on the best RAM to buy. I've read that
> Corsair and Kingston are good as well as Viking.
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

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Hi, and to add mine 1p worth. Check with your motherboard manufactures
website as too what they recommend, some boards can be quite finicky.......
Chris C
"BAR" <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:D2720ECD-53D0-4536-B720-F4BA306E1451@microsoft.com...
> These 3rd party companies buy the chips and assemble them onto boards;
> they
> do not manufacture the chips.
>
> Chip makers include Intel, Motorola, Samsung, and Mitsubishi: any or all
> of
> these companies supply to the assemblers. They can also supply assembled
> memory modules.
>
> Thus one begs to ask which is better? The reality is that it is much of a
> muchness...not quite the same as asking if Ford or GM is a better car.
>
> I once distributed memory for one of these manufacturers and they even buy
> from each other and resll the modules.
>
> So for memory..in 20 years in the business, I have not yet come across a
> memory module that has failed once installed: no matter where the product
> was
> assembled. Occasionally one may have a faulty manufactured module and then
> one needs to be sure that the RMA policy is good and that a replacement
> unit
> will be given NOW.
>
> What you need to do is make sure that whatever you buy, it is compatible
> with the existing modules ...exact detailled specifications. Type / Speed
> etc. If you have a new build, then it won't be a problem.
>
>
>
> "Jack Carlson" wrote:
>
>> I was curious to know others opinions on the best RAM to buy. I've read
>> that
>> Corsair and Kingston are good as well as Viking.
>>
>>
>>
 

Rick

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Oct 14, 2003
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0
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Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I would say that the best memory is dependent upon your MOBO. I found
that not all memory chips would work on my MOBO (Asus A8V)

Jack Carlson wrote:
> I was curious to know others opinions on the best RAM to buy. I've read that
> Corsair and Kingston are good as well as Viking.
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Jack Carlson wrote:
> I was curious to know others opinions on the best RAM to buy. I've
> read that Corsair and Kingston are good as well as Viking.


Corsair memory is good, and Kingston is, as well. Can't speak to
Viking, as I've only seen it sold in the sort of places (Wal-Mart,
Best Buy, CompUSA, etc.) where I wouldn't buy computer components on a
dare. Given a choice, though, I always purchase Crucial.


--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on
having
both at once. - RAH
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Your recommendation is important : many good makes. Many motherboards
require "specific brands" or at least have only tested some and only
"guarantee" optimal performance with those tested.

"Chris Catt" <cuke(nospam)@hotmail.com> a écrit dans le message de
news:OhehE9atEHA.636@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Hi, and to add mine 1p worth. Check with your motherboard manufactures
> website as too what they recommend, some boards can be quite
finicky.......
> Chris C
> "BAR" <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:D2720ECD-53D0-4536-B720-F4BA306E1451@microsoft.com...
> > These 3rd party companies buy the chips and assemble them onto boards;
> > they
> > do not manufacture the chips.
> >
> > Chip makers include Intel, Motorola, Samsung, and Mitsubishi: any or all
> > of
> > these companies supply to the assemblers. They can also supply
assembled
> > memory modules.
> >
> > Thus one begs to ask which is better? The reality is that it is much of
a
> > muchness...not quite the same as asking if Ford or GM is a better car.
> >
> > I once distributed memory for one of these manufacturers and they even
buy
> > from each other and resll the modules.
> >
> > So for memory..in 20 years in the business, I have not yet come across a
> > memory module that has failed once installed: no matter where the
product
> > was
> > assembled. Occasionally one may have a faulty manufactured module and
then
> > one needs to be sure that the RMA policy is good and that a replacement
> > unit
> > will be given NOW.
> >
> > What you need to do is make sure that whatever you buy, it is compatible
> > with the existing modules ...exact detailled specifications. Type /
Speed
> > etc. If you have a new build, then it won't be a problem.
> >
> >
> >
> > "Jack Carlson" wrote:
> >
> >> I was curious to know others opinions on the best RAM to buy. I've read
> >> that
> >> Corsair and Kingston are good as well as Viking.
> >>
> >>
> >>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Jack Carlson" <jack@email.com> wrote:

>I was curious to know others opinions on the best RAM to buy. I've read that
>Corsair and Kingston are good as well as Viking.
>

Not sure about Corsair, having never used any of their products.

Crucial and Kingston are the brands that I see recommended most often,
and I have always found them to be high quality. The 30 day
compatibility guarantee (Crucial) and the return policy (Kingston
"specific" products) make them the safest choices for most purchasers.

And both their web sites provide specific memory selection based on
the make and model of your actual computer.


Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
--
Microsoft MVP
On-Line Help Computer Service
http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

"The reason computer chips are so small is computers don't eat much."
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

You left out Winbond and Infineon chips. These are two of the most
popular RAM chips out there :)

The thing is, you have to know which companies rebadge memory and which
ones actually develop their own. There is quality in Corsiar, OCZ, and
a few other memory modules that is not there in others.

-----
Nathan McNulty

BAR wrote:
> These 3rd party companies buy the chips and assemble them onto boards; they
> do not manufacture the chips.
>
> Chip makers include Intel, Motorola, Samsung, and Mitsubishi: any or all of
> these companies supply to the assemblers. They can also supply assembled
> memory modules.
>
> Thus one begs to ask which is better? The reality is that it is much of a
> muchness...not quite the same as asking if Ford or GM is a better car.
>
> I once distributed memory for one of these manufacturers and they even buy
> from each other and resll the modules.
>
> So for memory..in 20 years in the business, I have not yet come across a
> memory module that has failed once installed: no matter where the product was
> assembled. Occasionally one may have a faulty manufactured module and then
> one needs to be sure that the RMA policy is good and that a replacement unit
> will be given NOW.
>
> What you need to do is make sure that whatever you buy, it is compatible
> with the existing modules ...exact detailled specifications. Type / Speed
> etc. If you have a new build, then it won't be a problem.
>
>
>
> "Jack Carlson" wrote:
>
>
>>I was curious to know others opinions on the best RAM to buy. I've read that
>>Corsair and Kingston are good as well as Viking.
>>
>>
>>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I would rank Corsair at the top of the memory maker's with OCZ right
behind them. PNY makes excellent Dual Channel memory kits, but stay
away from their lower end stuff. Viking is not good memory as it is
almost all rebadged Nanya memory (which is what other companies such as
PQI, KByte, and Patriot use). Kingston is up there, but they don't
compete with Corsair or OCZ.

I build a lot of overclocking computers and have run tests on hundreds
of different memory modules. Corsair and OCZ have the lowest failure
rates out there. Some memory companies may use the same RAM Chips as
Corsair, OCZ, and Kingston, but their implementation of the chips limit
the stability and capabilities.

The design is very important and not everything relies on the chips
used. That being said, it is always best to look at online reviews of
memory modules from places like xbitlabs.com for research ;)

-----
Nathan McNulty

Jack Carlson wrote:
> I was curious to know others opinions on the best RAM to buy. I've read that
> Corsair and Kingston are good as well as Viking.
>
>
 

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