Question Which is the better gaming OS, 7 or 10?

groo

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My system will be marginal for some upcoming games, so I want to optimize where I can. which of the 2 OS options with DX12 have the least wasted background processing. Any other things to consider when choosing an OS for a gaming?
 

Math Geek

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very little difference if both will run the game.

but the quote above is a bit off. dx 12 is only win 10, yet it says it can run on win 7 which can not use dx12.......

more and more i'm seeing win 10 only games though many many still work with win 7. in the long run, we'll be left with no choice but to use win 10 or hope more can work on linux. some dx12 games actually already run on linux so they are clearly working on it.
 
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groo

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they make DX12 for W7 now or at least they are opening up DX12 to w7 for multiple titles. Apparently to keep the Chinese market happy as they run quite a few W7 machines.
 
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klooger28

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In my experience windows 10 uses a little bit more cpu than 7, but a lot less ram. Plus as others have mentioned, some games aren't compatible with win 7.
 
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groo

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In my experience windows 10 uses a little bit more cpu than 7, but a lot less ram. Plus as others have mentioned, some games aren't compatible with win 7.
and plenty of older stuff isn't compatible with 10. I guess the question is am I going to be more likely to to do something new than wont run on 7 or more likely to do something old that wont run on 10.

I'm thinking I'll do 7 on this machine with a new SSD, then dual boot the next build.
 

hotaru.hino

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I would argue Windows 10 is better, simply for compatibility reasons. It looks like the OS more or less standardized and either app developers finally got their crap together or Microsoft started enforcing "proper" ways to do things for new apps as I haven't ran into a case where an app developed for the NT 6 family (Windows Vista to 10) had issues. i.e., if it runs fine on Vista or 7, it runs fine on Windows 10. This is also on top of Windows 10 being compatible out of the box with modern hardware. Also since Windows 7 support dropped this year, support for it from other developers and manufacturers are going to start dropping off

Things get a bit hairy if the app was developed with/for NT 5 (Windows XP) or earlier.
 

groo

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I'm pretty sure my current/soon to be back-up graphics card is not 10 friendly. Its not overly 8.1 friendly either but it does work. It was fine on 7 and Vista. I don't run much professional level software from my home computer (often very outdated), so that wouldn't be a big deal. I don't know the likelihood of wanting to get back into old games though. I'm probably more likely to get into a new on-line game vs. wanting to redo NWN2 or the like.

I suspect most major new title are going to be 7 friendly to get a piece of the China market. I don't know enough about the videogame market to know if people do stuff that doesn't fly in China, like suggest Taiwan is an independent country or something equally egregious in the story, and therefore wouldn't bother with the Chinese market anyways.

The fact that I am focusing in on playing 2077 ATM on a machine with a CPU just a sliver below stated min, suggests to me that 7 will likely run it better, if as reported W7 is less CPU intensive.

it also looks like a small handful of DX12 features do not port to W7, but are these features used in the games I would be wanting to play?

I was sort of hoping for a more clear-cut answer. It would be clear-cut is not for the marginal CPU and ancient graphics card. On a new build it would be 10 all the way.
 

hotaru.hino

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I'm pretty sure my current/soon to be back-up graphics card is not 10 friendly. Its not overly 8.1 friendly either but it does work. It was fine on 7 and Vista. I don't run much professional level software from my home computer (often very outdated), so that wouldn't be a big deal. I don't know the likelihood of wanting to get back into old games though. I'm probably more likely to get into a new on-line game vs. wanting to redo NWN2 or the like.

I suspect most major new title are going to be 7 friendly to get a piece of the China market. I don't know enough about the videogame market to know if people do stuff that doesn't fly in China, like suggest Taiwan is an independent country or something equally egregious in the story, and therefore wouldn't bother with the Chinese market anyways.

The fact that I am focusing in on playing 2077 ATM on a machine with a CPU just a sliver below stated min, suggests to me that 7 will likely run it better, if as reported W7 is less CPU intensive.

it also looks like a small handful of DX12 features do not port to W7, but are these features used in the games I would be wanting to play?

I was sort of hoping for a more clear-cut answer. It would be clear-cut is not for the marginal CPU and ancient graphics card. On a new build it would be 10 all the way.
The minimum graphics hardware requirements for Windows 10 is simply a DX9 compatible card that has a WDDM 1.0 driver. i.e., if the card had support on Vista, it'll work on Windows 10. The only issue would be performance on the desktop. Also in my experience, requirements in games doesn't really mean much. It should be used as a suggestion, not as an absolute. As an experiment I ran Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare with two cores out of four disabled. The game complained and said I didn't mean minimum requirements, but it ran at 60 FPS most of the time anyway.

As far as DX12 features are concerned, every feature of DX12 except DXR was backported to DX11. DX12 is a programming paradigm change, not a feature update (well, with the exception of DXR). I don't think Microsoft intends for DX12 to replace DX11 because DX11 is useful for developers who are starting out with graphics programming. That is, you should start with DX11 and if you find your application lacking in performance and you can pin it down to API overhead, then you switch to DX12.
 

groo

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The minimum graphics hardware requirements for Windows 10 is simply a DX9 compatible card that has a WDDM 1.0 driver. i.e., if the card had support on Vista, it'll work on Windows 10. The only issue would be performance on the desktop. Also in my experience, requirements in games doesn't really mean much. It should be used as a suggestion, not as an absolute. As an experiment I ran Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare with two cores out of four disabled. The game complained and said I didn't mean minimum requirements, but it ran at 60 FPS most of the time anyway.

As far as DX12 features are concerned, every feature of DX12 except DXR was backported to DX11. DX12 is a programming paradigm change, not a feature update (well, with the exception of DXR). I don't think Microsoft intends for DX12 to replace DX11 because DX11 is useful for developers who are starting out with graphics programming. That is, you should start with DX11 and if you find your application lacking in performance and you can pin it down to API overhead, then you switch to DX12.
I couldn't find my 7 disks, so that made the decision easier.
 

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