[SOLVED] Which one is true? Task manager or Cpu-z

Oct 31, 2020
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Hello!
I have 8gb, ddr4, ????MHz, 1.2v, CL17 Memory(Ram)

Task manager showing 2400MHz
Cpu-z showing 2666MHz

My Ram
 

wi5pa

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May 20, 2012
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Both are true,
Task manager is showing your ram running at the stock motherboard speed of 2400mhz,
CPU-Z is just showing the ram for what it is on the label, regardless of the speed.

Your ram is currently running at 2400mhz

Enable xmp will put the speed upto 2666mhz
 

wi5pa

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May 20, 2012
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Both are true,
Task manager is showing your ram running at the stock motherboard speed of 2400mhz,
CPU-Z is just showing the ram for what it is on the label, regardless of the speed.

Your ram is currently running at 2400mhz

Enable xmp will put the speed upto 2666mhz
 
Oct 31, 2020
4
0
10
0
Both are true,
Task manager is showing your ram running at the stock motherboard speed of 2400mhz,
CPU-Z is just showing the ram for what it is on the label, regardless of the speed.

Your ram is currently running at 2400mhz

Enable xmp will put the speed upto 2666mhz
I can't find xmp on my bios.
Thank you
 
Actually its running at 933 x 1 = 933, but the motherboard is boosting it to the stock 2400mhz when it uses it. ( uncore frequancy )
No it's not.

933mhz is actual frequency. Effective frequency is 2x933=1866mhz. This is because of how double data rate (DDR) ram works - 2 data transfers per clock cycle.
Nothing is 2400mhz there. That's just obviously inaccurate number from Task manager.

It would be obvious to you too, if you knew, what you were talking about. ;)
 

wi5pa

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Running at the jedec#8 timings 1236mhz.
The ram is most likely boosting between the two frequancys 1833mhz and 2472mhz depending on the CPU/motherboards needs,
CPU-Z wont be able to show that,
TASK MANAGER will show the motherboard actual highest amount frequancy 2400mhz, but also doesnt detail the boosting.
The motherboard is controlling it automatically.
 

wi5pa

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The ram is rated at 2666mhz so the motherboard can do what it likes with it, it is likely auto optimised to OC with the BCLK, when it wants to,
its running at the 1266mhz timings / 2400mhz, its possible is designed to reduce heat as i think he is using a laptop.
 
@wi5pa I encourage you to read this article about memory, before critiquing others and spreading misinformation:

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/pc-memory-ram-frequency-timings,6328.html

Firstly, having one memory module in single channel does not affect frequency in any way... by running the memory in dual channel you double the bandwidth, not the frequency.

About the frequency number is like @SkyNetRising said... you can find it in the article:

Data Rate is the number of times per second (frequency) that a module sends and receives data. Clock signals resemble a square wave, and Double Data Rate simply means that data is transferred on both the rising and falling edge of the clock signal. Doubling the data rate in this manner allows (for example) a 1600 MHz wave to transfer data 3200 times per second. Because DDR data frequency is twice its clock frequency, it’s often referred to using the term MT/s (mega-transfers per second).
Secondly, DRAM(Dynamic Random Access Memory) is called Dynamic because of the technology it uses... definitely not because the frequency is variable. You can change it, but the motherboard won't dynamically adjust DRAM frequency, voltage and timings during normal use.

Those JEDEC profiles you see are just sets of standard frequency and timings combinations that could be used with the module. Memory can be set manually from the BIOS to those values, but they do not automatically adjust depending on load. So, DRAM voltage, frequency timings, etc. are all static (you might see very minor fluctuations in voltage... it's normal).

No need for hate and "furiously" downvoting others... it's especially rude when they're right.

Simple advice: before arguing with others make sure that you thoroughly know what you're talking about beforehand.
 
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