Question Which one?

harpsinuno

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CONDUCTONAUT LIQUID METAL THERMAL PASTE - 1G
Thermal Grizzly Hydronaut Pasta Térmica 1.5ml

Which one is better to maintain good temperatures?
 

Eximo

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The first one is an extreme overclocking solution. Normally that would go between the CPU and the metal cap (heatspreader) That involves removing the thermal paste under there or removing the existing solder under there. Literally what it says it is, liquid metal. If you get it on anything you aren't supposed to you could easily kill components. Then you would use normal thermal compound between the heatspreader and CPU cooler.

Hydronaut is their second best thermal compound and is intended for water cooling. Kryonaut is their top of the line, also for extreme uses. It can handle liquid nitrogen temperatures.

Other normal options would be Noctua NT-H1, NT-H2, Arctic MX-4, etc.
 

hotaru.hino

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Conductonaut is basically the top-end as far as consumer accessible thermal interfaces go. However, it's not for the feint of heart to install because you have to damn sure it doesn't leak out and touch anything electronic. Hydronaut is more like traditional thermal grease.

Unless you're going for overclocking records, just get thermal grease. Easier to work with and often you don't have to take special precautions.
 
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harpsinuno

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Conductonaut is basically the top-end as far as consumer accessible thermal interfaces go. However, it's not for the feint of heart to install because you have to damn sure it doesn't leak out and touch anything electronic. Hydronaut is more like traditional thermal grease.

Unless you're going for overclocking records, just get thermal grease. Easier to work with and often you don't have to take special precautions.

I will overclock my system (i9-10900K until 5.2 or maximum 5.3 GHz) and I will use water cooling, probably Kraken Z73.
So, Hydronaut as I understood...
 

harpsinuno

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Depends on how much you buy, but yes, in general all thermal compounds are affordable to the PC enthusiast. I tend toward a tube that allows for at least 3 or 4 applications.
But do we need to make several applications or something like once a year or every two years? On my actual pc I did it two times in 10 years but probably it is not the best way... I am not experienced with this...
 

Eximo

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No, generally you don't need to replace the thermal compound too often. There are certainly some out there that aren't as stable as what OEMs use, but that is one of the reasons they perform better. As long as you are monitoring temperatures from time to time and they are within norms, everything is fine.

I repair or build a computer at least once a year, so I always have some laying around to use.
 
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iPeekYou

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But do we need to make several applications or something like once a year or every two years? On my actual pc I did it two times in 10 years but probably it is not the best way... I am not experienced with this...
There's no real need, unless you notice temps are worse even with similar ambient temps.

I'd recommend just using Kryonaut unless you're delidding the CPU. Liquid metal is basically for direct die applications, not so much good for replacing thermal paste.

Hydronaut's specialty is really direct die application, really good on laptops but for general desktop use Kryonaut is 1-2 degrees better.
 
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Eximo

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Liquid metal also destroys aluminum, damages copper, and really only plays nice with nickel coatings, which is what heatspreaders and high end air coolers tend to be coated in. AIOs typically have a copper cold plate and the liquid metal will slowly eat it and be absorbed by the copper. That will need re-application every year or so.
 
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harpsinuno

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Liquid metal also destroys aluminum, damages copper, and really only plays nice with nickel coatings, which is what heatspreaders and high end air coolers tend to be coated in. AIOs typically have a copper cold plate and the liquid metal will slowly eat it and be absorbed by the copper. That will need re-application every year or so.
Even with Kryonaut you need every year's maintenance?
 

Phaaze88

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Kryonaut burns out faster with sustained thermals around 80C or so - it's on TG's product page - higher sustained thermals equals more frequent repastes.
More expensive than what the price tag lets on.

So yes, depending on your success with the overclocking endeavor, you could be replacing it often.
 
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hotaru.hino

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Kryonaut Extreme seems to have more conductivity. Not necessary for a very good overclocking?
Higher thermal conductivity is important, but performance tapers off quickly. The sole purpose of thermal grease is to fill in the gaps between the heat sink and the thing being cooled because air is a good thermal insulator. What's more important than conductivity is how thin the TIM application is. The difference in performance between the cheapo white goo you can find on Ali Express to something like the Kryonaut is like within 5C as long as the heat sink mounting pressure causes the TIM to become thin enough.

See https://www.tomshardware.com/best-picks/best-thermal-paste
 
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harpsinuno

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Higher thermal conductivity is important, but performance tapers off quickly. The sole purpose of thermal grease is to fill in the gaps between the heat sink and the thing being cooled because air is a good thermal insulator. What's more important than conductivity is how thin the TIM application is. The difference in performance between the cheapo white goo you can find on Ali Express to something like the Kryonaut is like within 5C as long as the heat sink mounting pressure causes the TIM to become thin enough.

See https://www.tomshardware.com/best-picks/best-thermal-paste
I got confused, sorry... I would like to keep it simple because I am trying to build a machine myself but it is already taking 4 or 5 months between choosing parts, receiving feedbacks, asking questions and so on. So, what I would like to know in a very simple way is: Is Kryonaut (not the extreme) a good paste for my build?
 

Phaaze88

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NO, because it is way too expensive(yes, even if you are loaded) for what it offers, combined with what you're planning to do with your build.

Kryonaut Extreme is for:
-Extreme overclocking
-LN2 cooling
You aren't the intended target for this stuff.
 

harpsinuno

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NO, because it is way too expensive(yes, even if you are loaded) for what it offers, combined with what you're planning to do with your build.

Kryonaut Extreme is for:
-Extreme overclocking
-LN2 cooling
You aren't the intended target for this stuff.
I asked about the "normal" Kryonaut...
 
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harpsinuno

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WHOOPS! Misread the last post!

The normal one is fine. You may have to repaste more often depending on use and abuse.

"You aren't the intended target for this stuff." - I don't know what you mean by this, but I always like to keep it practical. I read many things but when we ask questions one needs to be practical like Yes/No, A/B. Otherwise, in my case, if I lose the conducting wire, I will have the machine in 5 years and not in 5 months... :\

And another thing: computer components are changing very fast in terms of prices. Yesterday I was waiting for some answers in some foruns that didn't arrive. I thought I would buy processor today with a very good promotion. Before being almost ready, processor rose up more than 100 euros. :\ So, I need to start all over again: which motherboard, AMD or Intel, and so on... For graphic card was more painful due to world shortage...
 

Phaaze88

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The motherboard thread.
That one wasn't simple, because the 2 boards(Strix E Gaming and Maximus Hero)were practically the same.
What separated them were their looks, pricing, and if they had any useful features you would even care about. That last one is far from simple: If YOU don't know EVERYTHING you want in a motherboard - throw the overclocking stuff aside for a moment - then others don't know either.
More often than not, users overspend on motherboards on features they never use/need.

Kryonaut, Kryonaut Extreme, Conductonaut, Hydronaut, etc.
Practical: It shouldn't have mattered, except for Conductonaut; if careless, you can go from 100 to 0 REAL quick.
Simple: It wasn't, because they all have applications they excel at, and others they're not so good for.
I remember you mention wanting to do high overclocking, but with a hybrid cooler:
Hydronaut: Yes.
Kryonaut: Yes, but that ~80C caveat though...
Kryonaut Extreme: Yes, but a waste if not LN2 cooling.
Conductonaut: No. Should be used under the IHS, or in direct die applications.

Didn't see the Intel - AMD thread, so IDK.

I'm probably just making this harder... I'll do this then:
Simple list
Cpu: whatever the kind folks in that thread help you decide on.
Paste: Hydronaut
Motherboard: Since you don't know exactly what you want in a board beyond overclocking, a board of 200-ish(USD) for AMD, and 300-ish for Intel should have you covered. [Everything's more expensive these days, including mobos...]
See? I tried to simplify the motherboards, but I couldn't...
 

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