Question Whos using an AMD to edit their 4K videos ? I think nobody in the world ever uses and AMD for this ?

stonehedge99

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Jun 3, 2016
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10,530
I posted on several threads and forums and till now cant find one soul that says they edit their 4K videos on Pr and do some Ae work using a Ryzen 5000 series. Yet the company touts that series as being damn good in Video Editing, but all these mktg depts will never mention what video editing. Must be 720p or 360p video editing. I wanted to buy a 5700G and use it for 4K video edits and some minor supplementary Ae work.

Im using a <Mod Edit> low i3 6100 and its managing it well....i just want little better performance and for that nobody can say if the editing will even run on a Ryzen, some say it has ZERO hardware codecs it can understand any videos codec and cant tell **** [Mod Edit] from sugar when it comes to video. Some say its a modern processor its beefy it can do it....ask them if they had a use at it....and no answer.....they dont even own the processor and havent even tried once.!!!
 
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Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Update your post to include full system hardware specs and OS information.

Start with the video editing software that you are using or intending to use.

Most software applications provide some listing of hardware specs in the form of "minimal", "recommended", and "best".

You do not want minimal and you do want as much "best" as you can afford.

Overall performance will be determined by the slowest component in the hosting system.

Lack of available RAM could be an issue. A older slower HDD versus a SDD could be an issue.

Or simply a drive that is filled beyond 70% capacity.

= = = =

You can use Window's built in tools to monitor system performance.

Task Manager, Resource Monitor, and Process Explorer (Microsoft, free download).

Use the tools (one at at time) to observe system performance. First when not running video editing software and then again while running video editing software.

Determine what system resources are being used, to what extent (%), and what is using any given resource.

The "low i3 6100" may or may not be the limiting component.
 

stonehedge99

Honorable
Jun 3, 2016
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10,530
Bascially Im planning to build a system with a 5700G on b550M motherboard. This will be only for working with Premiere Pro and After Effects.
My projects are all in 4K but worked on a 2.5K timeline with output to 2.5k. My projects are all only 3-4 mins in timeline duration.
Plz keep in note my expectations....ive been working with the lowest rung i3 and have managed with that....i get smooth timeline scrubs as long as i keep 1/8 preview res (which aint that bad when the preview window is quarter of your 1080p screen). I can scrub like mad with color grades and masks with blur effects etc slapped onto the 40 so clips on the timeline, smooth fluid response AND the system has (touch wood) NEVER crashed EVEN ONCE since installation LOL. Ae will very very very rarely freeze the preview, but no crash...you can still save etc and restart, i guess the underpowered HD530 iGPU cant handle triple monitor and the Ae preview.

The rest of the rig already exists as below and this will only be a mobo+processor upgrade. I have to work without a DGPU for now till i can throw in a GTX 2060 or something.


MY EXISTING RIG…
i3 6100. > This is what is getting changed.
64gb 3200mhz CL16 Ram.
No DGPU.
250gb NVME for OS n Progs.
250gb NVME as scratch disk.
1TB SSD for Footage.
HDD for Renders.
HDD for Backups.
650w Corsair Bronze certified PSU.
Triple Monitor (1080px3).


SO WHY DO I WANT TO UPGRADE THEN ?
Renders take approx 1:20 in time to complete (a 2 min video takes 40mins to an hour to render). Some effects politely say then cant run on this Piece Of Crap iGPU and then do nothing. When drawing masks or color grading....the vertices/handles/sliders get sluggish and drag thereby making it difficult to sometimes fine tune.

Now theres mixed opinions with folks saying the 5700G wont even be able to handle the timeline, even like what my i3 could. Others say it will be at least 5 times better in experience compared to my i3. Some say the 5700G doesnt even have internal graphics hardware video decoders (Ive read on some reviews and seen a chart itself that it does have internal hardware acceleration of h264... h265.... VP9..... WMV......etc.... decode and encode etc except AV1). They say only INTEL can give smooth performance due to Quick Sync. Yet i read elsewhere to deactivate QS as it screws up the video quality and to rely on CPU based encoding only.

Can someone here who has used this processor tell me for real wether the 5700G can handle and give me a better experience than my old system. I can afford to pick up the i7 12700 too....but triple the wattage !!! Runs hotter....so will need a spl cooler, will probably demand a higher PSU than my already new Corsair 650w. And i have to run my rig on solar panels from my roof in the day time, incoming is about 700w yes but then other home appliances ?
 

stonehedge99

Honorable
Jun 3, 2016
33
0
10,530
Update your post to include full system hardware specs and OS information.

Start with the video editing software that you are using or intending to use.

Most software applications provide some listing of hardware specs in the form of "minimal", "recommended", and "best".

You do not want minimal and you do want as much "best" as you can afford.

Overall performance will be determined by the slowest component in the hosting system.

Lack of available RAM could be an issue. A older slower HDD versus a SDD could be an issue.

Or simply a drive that is filled beyond 70% capacity.

= = = =

You can use Window's built in tools to monitor system performance.

Task Manager, Resource Monitor, and Process Explorer (Microsoft, free download).

Use the tools (one at at time) to observe system performance. First when not running video editing software and then again while running video editing software.

Determine what system resources are being used, to what extent (%), and what is using any given resource.

The "low i3 6100" may or may not be the limiting component.
Ill only be working in Pr and Ae. My projects are not more than 4 mins long.

I have checked my resource monitor over 6 months everytime im working and observed....

iGPU - NEVER USED more than 10% even in the most strenuous processes like rendering. So no sweat here.

RAM - Used to touch 80% during working/designing in Ae. That was with 32gb ram. Now upgraded to 64gb ram all of the same make and model -3200mhz. CL-16. After upgrade never touches more than 30%.....so 64gb itself is overkill and wont ever be used now i think. So no bottleneck here.

DRIVES - 2 NVME and 1 SSD and then internal HDD only for backup of entire system. Never seen a maxed out disk here both during design and render. No bottle-necking AFAIK.

PROCESSOR - During design, mostly maxed out,,, during render completely maxed out and wont let you open or work on anything else. During Pr timeline playback proc is maxed out if preview is set to 1/4 res and few frames are dropped. During Ae work always running in spikes with a small change to a mask bezier causing spikes to 100%. SEVERE BOTTLE-NECKING OBSERVED HERE ONLY. Hence the decision to upgrade this part with a matching mobo too obviously.
 
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5700G can render in x265 software mode using any settings you would like. Plus it's Cezanne and thus Video Core Next 2.2 so people seem happy enough with its hardware encoding in H.265 and less so with H.264, noting it doesn't support b-frames (added in RX6000 series GPUs) so compression at any quality level is also a bit less than Intel or nVidia.

The reason people love Quick Sync is the quality presets are pretty much what you'd select in software mode so there's little downside to the extra speed. Whereas the time savings with VCN or NVENC encoding are worthless if the output quality is not to your liking with any of the presets.

You'd think going from 2 cores to 8 means you could encode in software using the CPU and still have some CPU power left over, but 5700G is only really suggested for up to 1440p encoding. If it turns out to not be fast enough, what are you going to do, add an nVidia card to use NVENC? That would use as much power as i7-12700 or 13700. Probably better to stick with what you know, just more of it.
 
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stonehedge99

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Jun 3, 2016
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Hi BFG.....

When you mentioned the 5700G is only suggested for upto 1440p encoding....that means its not suited for 4K work ? Am i understanding correct. If correct then the 12700 ? Is that 4K encoding capable ?

So you feel a 12700 would be a safer bet right ? Currently on the i3 im using Pr and Ae on completely software only mode....NO HARDWARE acceleration anywhere....before that i had the iGPU HD530 selected and i got crashes and freezes. So i changed to SOFTWARE ONLY mode everywhere in the settings.....render settings....wherever there was an option to select harware acceleration, ive deslected it. After that Pr and Ae became rock solid....zero crashes for months n months ive been working. Sluggish at times yes....but has NEVER crashed. Based on this input what would you suggest.....is it using QuickSync or only pure processor power ? If its the latter then a 5700G should give better performance by only giving more raw CPU power than my old i3 (if QSV is out of the equation) ?
 
If I understand your workload correctly, you are editing 4k videos into short 2.5k videos in software, which is 1440p so either 5700G or 12700 will do perfectly adequately and ~3x as quickly as your current setup so you should be happy with the upgrade either way. It's just they may feel slow/laggy if you ever actually needed to encode videos in 4k that way, kind of like how your current system is pretty suboptimal for 2.5k now. I mean if you've put up with encoding a 4 minute video taking an hour on the i3 all this time then you should be delighted.

As encoding is almost completely insensitive to cache, the halved cache of the 5000 series APUs have no effect on that (and neither would the 50% more cache in the 5800X3D). What would hurt a bit is reusing your old DDR4-3200 RAM as this application can really use as fast memory as you can throw at it, whether you are using software encode or Quick Sync/VCN on iGP (obviously NVENC on a discrete nVidia card would use its own local graphics memory instead). This may be less of a problem for the 5700G as technically the fastest it officially supports is 3200 so any faster would be overclocking, but fast DDR5 would really be preferable on the 12700.

The 12700 is still faster for software encode even with only 3200 memory, but the 5700G definitely has the more powerful iGP which is useful for other things. And of course it's only 65w so may be worth a try. I only suggested the 12700 because I thought you were already using Quick Sync, but since you aren't then hardware acceleration on either will involve a lot of tinkering and experimentation anyway, to find output results that you are satisfied with. Plus you seem fully willing to fall back to software if it doesn't work well.

It is worth trying Quick Sync or VCN again both because the graphics drivers are newer (Intel in particular is famous for not updating them), and Adobe obviously test their hardware acceleration more on the latest GPUs so it's less likely to crash with those. If you are happy with the quality, then not only is it much faster, but the specialized hardware consumes less power to do the work than software. People who demand the highest quality encode possible though usually choose x264/x265 software mode even though it is slower.