[SOLVED] Why am I getting this temps? (Also, freezes with no BSOD)

ZerMetKi

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Jul 29, 2014
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From a while back, I been having lots of troubles, starting from having some high temps coming from the mobo

View: https://imgur.com/gallery/Usbt9rA


which they used to be only like one high temp, which made me believe that it was just some false error, but now it shows 4 high temps and the PC has been getting random freezes with no BSOD; and lastly, the WiFi/Bluetooth module stopped working (I believe it has a short because the PC randomly makes sounds like if a USB was connected or disconnected).

I wasn't able to install the Windows Debugger (something about .NET Framework 4 needed to be installed... but when trying to install it would say a newer version was already installed), so I wasn't even able to look at the XML nor the DMP files, but they are in the next link:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PEGDpTmaGFID380qRadB4Jwl9kksU68F/view?usp=sharing

I hope that anyone can bring some light to my troubles.


P.S. I went to an authorized Asus repair center and they would even look at my mobo. They just said "mobos don't get repaired, just replaced". I believe it's BS, but what do you say?
 

Darkbreeze

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I say they are EXACTLY right. Motherboards do NOT get repaired, they get replaced. They couldn't have given you more accurate advice. Even the motherboard manufacturer will almost always not repair any board that is faulty. They will throw it in the trash bin and replace it with a refurbished or new unit when it is under warranty unless there is something very easy needed to fix it like a replaceable BIOS ROM or sound chip. Otherwise, trash.

What are your EXACT hardware specifications AND what utility are you using to monitor temps? It looks like an AMD platform from what little I can see, an older one, and it looks like HWmonitor. If that's true, you are using the totally wrong software.

Please tell what hardware and utility we are dealing with and what EXACTLY you are doing at the time we are seeing those temps?
 
Asus warranty policy is different depending on the country you bought the motherboard in. Warranty period is based on the day of manufacture.

Intel X79 Chipset release date was November 14, 2011, so it is likely your warranty has expired years ago.

If you want something repaired and want it tested, parts for a motherboard as old as the one you have may not be available any longer.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
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Actually, warranty period is based on the date of purchase, NOT the date of manufacture, FROM an authorized seller. If you buy from a 3rd party such as Ebay sellers, then all bets are off if they want to play it that way but they usually won't so long as the serial number for your product is genuine and has never been registered. I assure you that I recently bought a brand new Hero VIII motherboard to replace my Z170x-Gaming 5, and the registration information clearly shows it being under warranty for the next three years even though we know manufacturing on Z170 stopped YEARS ago.

 
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ZerMetKi

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Hi and thanks for your prompt response!

These are my components (copied from Speccy):

Operating System
Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1
CPU
Intel Core i7 4930K @ 3.40GHz 38 °C
Ivy Bridge-E 22nm Technology
RAM
16.0GB DDR3 @ 667MHz (9-9-9-24)
Motherboard
ASUSTeK COMPUTER INC. RAMPAGE IV BLACK EDITION (LGA2011) 37 °C
Graphics
SHARP LCD (1920x1080@60Hz)
4095MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 (NVIDIA) 34 °C
Storage
2794GB Seagate ST3000DM001-1CH166 ATA Device (SATA ) 41 °C
238GB Samsung SSD 840 PRO Seri SCSI Disk Device (SATA (SSD)) 37 °C
Optical Drives
DiscSoft Virtual SCSI CdRom Device
Audio
NVIDIA High Definition Audio

And, yes, I'm using HWmonitor; what should I use instead?

Thanks for all your help!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
HWinfo or Core Temp.

Monitoring software

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z, NZXT CAM and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on older AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. When starting HWinfo after installation, always check the box next to "sensors only" and de-select the box next to "summary".


Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings, plus, it is extremely rare for HWinfo to not report the correct sensor values under the correct sensor listings, or misreport other information. Utilities like HWmonitor, Openhardware monitor and Speccy, tend to COMMONLY misreport sensor data, or not report it at all.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 version 26.6 or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.


*Download HWinfo



For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:


*Download Core Temp



Posting screenshots, when requested, is helpful so WE can see what is going on as well and you can learn how to do that here:

How to post images on Tom's hardware forums
 

ZerMetKi

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Jul 29, 2014
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Sorry for taking so long in answering. Again, thanks for all the help (I'll try these softwares!).

Turns out that my MOBO is now fine. What did I do? Removed NZXT's CAM. A friend of mine just randomly told me that it was causing him BSOD, so that he removed it. I did it, just the last day I updated my answer in here. 2 weeks after, no more random shut downs, no tearing in games, and everything is working just fine. And then a cousin just told me that he experienced the same thing (can't believe I forgot that).

I have a Kraken X60 and a X61, and they are great (both my GPU and CPU are 40°-50° under load), and they are working just fine without the software. Gotta say: good hardware, horrible app.

Thanks for all your help, and I hope that this helps someone else.

P.S. My MOBO still doesn't recognice the integrated Bluetooth/WiFi module, but, has I said, I'm having no more troubles, and I was actually thinking that that module was the cause for a short and all my others sympthms. I'll update if anything else happens.
 
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