[SOLVED] Why are my cpu temps so high with aio liquid cooler?

warcraftfelix.123

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Hi Guys!
I have an Intel Core i7 9700k without any overclocking on a Gigabyte Z370 gaming x cooled by a Cooler Master MasterLiquid 120R. I have been experiencing high temperature values for the cpu, which is quite frightening. While rendering in Vegas pro, I'm getting around a maximum of 85 celsius degrees. My pump is connected in the CPU_FAN header and the fan of the radiator is plugged in one of the SYS_FAN headers. The reason of this setup is that I have no PUMP_HEADER on my motherboard and as far as I know this is the proper way in this case. My pump works on 100% all the time, and the radiator fan is set to one of the motherboard's heat sensors. I tried to set the radiator fan to change fan speed according to the cpu temp sensor, but since its temperature was so volatile, the sound of the fan was so changing and nerve-racking. I mean in changed in a few seconds from 900 to 2500 rpm. The most confusing was that it did these speedups while doing nothing on the pc only a few chrome tabs open or just while being on the desktop.... no idea. When playing CS:GO I have around 70-80 degrees, which is in my opinion quite a lot considering that CS:GO doesn't have too high requirements. One thing I thought was strange that when I'm checking my temps and clocks, clock values of the cpu are basically jumping or moving around. In a few seconds it changes from 900Mhz to 4700 then 1700 to 2900 and again 900, and all this when I'm just using chrome or meanwhile I'm writing this post. Is my cpu <Mod Edit> up are is there a solution? So stressful that I have an expensive cpu with liquid cooling and my temps are so high...
Thank you!
 
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120mm aio is on par with low end air cooler priced at $25
switching to better cooling should definitely help, but for i7-k is not enough while doing heavy stuff like rendering
single tower air priced at $80 or 240mm aio should be your lovest cooling point
should you want to overclock, then twin tower air cooler (something like noctua d15) or atleast 280mm aio
 
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120mm aio is on par with low end air cooler priced at $25
switching to better cooling should definitely help, but for i7-k is not enough while doing heavy stuff like rendering
single tower air priced at $80 or 240mm aio should be your lovest cooling point
should you want to overclock, then twin tower air cooler (something like noctua d15) or atleast 280mm aio
 
Reactions: drivinfast247

punkncat

Splendid
Ambassador
A 120 AIO probably isn't sufficient to cool that 9700K.

You should have the fans reacting to the CPU temp, not motherboard temp. It is not unusual to have the fan be rangy in demand to the CPU use. My own AIO is constantly changing speed while surfing, while converting documents, and so on. It remains steady at idle and when under a heavy load like gaming or large renders.

You might attempt to set the sensor back to the CPU and then manually set a fan curve that is both effective as well as tolerable.

Your fan/AIO placement can have a big impact on it's ability to cool. What case and placement? Other fans?
 

warcraftfelix.123

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120mm aio is on par with low end air cooler priced at $25
switching to better cooling should definitely help, but for i7-k is not enough while doing heavy stuff like rendering
single tower air priced at $80 or 240mm aio should be your lovest cooling point
should you want to overclock, then twin tower air cooler (something like noctua d15) or atleast 280mm aio
Hi
thanks for quick answer.
What you're saying is considerable, but my problem is that this problem has been since only a few weeks. I haven't had such problem earlier.
 

warcraftfelix.123

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A 120 AIO probably isn't sufficient to cool that 9700K.

You should have the fans reacting to the CPU temp, not motherboard temp. It is not unusual to have the fan be rangy in demand to the CPU use. My own AIO is constantly changing speed while surfing, while converting documents, and so on. It remains steady at idle and when under a heavy load like gaming or large renders.

You might attempt to set the sensor back to the CPU and then manually set a fan curve that is both effective as well as tolerable.

Your fan/AIO placement can have a big impact on it's ability to cool. What case and placement? Other fans?
Hi
I will try to do that. But do you think that it's usual, that meanwhile the computer is "not used", for example i'm afk and no windows are open, the fan is still jumping between 900 and 2000 rpms? It's like the cpu works incorrectly and the temps are going high with no reason. Regarding the case and fans: I have a masterbox 5 pro which has the stock 3 fan, and of course the aio radiator fan, so 4 fans sum.
 
some background processes will run during idle, its normal
i have aio aswell with R7 3800x ,tho its 280mm aio, and mine fans are setup 60C -30%, 65C -35%, 70C-40%, 75C-45%, 80C-100%, aio is placed at top as exhaust, front intake and back exhaust are aswell configured to be non audible under 80C while keeping up with CPU temperatures (800-1000rpm during gaming)
during gaming its not audible, fans rampup pretty much just during stress test
 

warcraftfelix.123

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some background processes will run during idle, its normal
i have aio aswell with R7 3800x ,tho its 280mm aio, and mine fans are setup 60C -30%, 65C -35%, 70C-40%, 75C-45%, 80C-100%, aio is placed at top as exhaust, front intake and back exhaust are aswell configured to be non audible under 80C while keeping up with CPU temperatures
during gaming its not audible, fans rampup pretty much just during stress test
Mine is really audible when connected to cpu temperature, sometimes its so loud that it's audible in the other room...
 

geofelt

Titan
I think you are overly worried.
Your temperatures look normal.
Your minimum temps are in the 30-35c. range.
That suggests your aio is mounted properly.
Yes, the pump should always be working.

The high temps are in the 75c. range.
That is not worrisome.
The cpu monitors it's own temperature and will slow down or turn off if it detects a dangerous temperature.
That is around 100c.

You can use the motherboard fan profile to be less aggressive and more constant.
CSGO is quite cpu intensive, but primarily for one or two cores.

On cooling, first look to see that hour H100 radiator is getting sufficient fresh air to let it do it's job.
By temps, I would think so.
In time, expect your H100 to fail. They do not last forever.
Air will intrude through the tubes making the cooling less effective.
The pump, being a mechanical device can fail or get clogged.

I see no urgency in changing it out.
 

uWebb429

Estimable
70-80 degrees
Those are normal operating temperatures for Intel CPUs. Whether your CPU is at 60C or 90C makes no difference. It will happily run at full speed either way. Intel sets the thermal throttling temperature to 100C because they know their CPUs can run reliably at high temperatures. No worries.

If you do not plan to overclock, go into the BIOS and set a negative offset voltage of -75 mV. All Intel CPUs use too much voltage at default settings so Intel can guarantee long term stability. Reduce this extra voltage and this will reduce the heat.

Switch to the Windows High Performance power plan if you do not want to see your MHz jumping up and down. HWMonitor tends to exaggerate the MHz changes.
 
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Hi Guys!
I have an Intel Core i7 9700k without any overclocking on a Gigabyte Z370 gaming x cooled by a Cooler Master MasterLiquid 120R. I have been experiencing high temperature values for the cpu, which is quite frightening. While rendering in Vegas pro, I'm getting around a maximum of 85 celsius degrees. My pump is connected in the CPU_FAN header and the fan of the radiator is plugged in one of the SYS_FAN headers. The reason of this setup is that I have no PUMP_HEADER on my motherboard and as far as I know this is the proper way in this case. My pump works on 100% all the time, and the radiator fan is set to one of the motherboard's heat sensors. I tried to set the radiator fan to change fan speed according to the cpu temp sensor, but since its temperature was so volatile, the sound of the fan was so changing and nerve-racking. I mean in changed in a few seconds from 900 to 2500 rpm. The most confusing was that it did these speedups while doing nothing on the pc only a few chrome tabs open or just while being on the desktop.... no idea. When playing CS:GO I have around 70-80 degrees, which is in my opinion quite a lot considering that CS:GO doesn't have too high requirements. One thing I thought was strange that when I'm checking my temps and clocks, clock values of the cpu are basically jumping or moving around. In a few seconds it changes from 900Mhz to 4700 then 1700 to 2900 and again 900, and all this when I'm just using chrome or meanwhile I'm writing this post. Is my cpu <Mod Edit> up are is there a solution? So stressful that I have an expensive cpu with liquid cooling and my temps are so high...
Thank you!
At face value, those temps don't look too out of the ordinary for a 120mm AIO with that sort of CPU. The CPU will jump around rapidly in clock speed, its supposed to do that. Nothing in your post suggests anything wrong with your CPU. If your temps used to be better then I would check for dust build up on the radiator. If you link the AIO fan to CPU temp, don't be so aggressive at the lower end of your fan curve otherwise it will rev like a car engine.
 
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Hi Guys!
I have an Intel Core i7 9700k without any overclocking on a Gigabyte Z370 gaming x cooled by a Cooler Master MasterLiquid 120R.
I think a lot of folks overestimate the cooling capabilities of the quite smallish radiators, and this begins when they hear the phrase 'liquid cooled'; they are nothing like those 1 HP refrigeration chilling units like Intel used a few years back! :)

I see 4800 MHz as the all-core clock speed obtained, which is 200 MHz above stock...; do you have any overclocking presets/or above -stock all -core turbo targets configured in the BIOS or Intel's XTU, respectively?
 

warcraftfelix.123

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Jan 9, 2019
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I think a lot of folks overestimate the cooling capabilities of the quite smallish radiators, and this begins when they hear the phrase 'liquid cooled'; they are nothing like those 1 HP refrigeration chilling units like Intel used a few years back! :)

I see 4800 MHz as the all-core clock speed obtained, which is 200 MHz above stock...; do you have any overclocking presets/or above -stock all -core turbo targets configured in the BIOS or Intel's XTU, respectively?
Funny thing i haven’t done any changes in overclocking or anything in connenction with cpu, everything is on stock settings
 
So in summary what values should i set for clock and voltage? To get a stable clock for lower temperature
try this app, there you can undervolt/limit boost clock to get better temperatures
 

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