Question Why ASUS laptop getting slow with time when it runs without shutdown (Only sleeps)?

Aug 5, 2019
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Hello there,
If you have any clue regarding this issue. your support is highly appreciated.

I'm a graphic designer and I usually don't shutdown my laptop, only thing I do is make it sleep when I'm not using it. I use couple of heavy programs like Adobe illustrator and Photoshop with lot of tabs on chrome ( I know that you may say that chrome eats lot of ram and then my laptop gets slower) but it's not the case when It got slow, even I close the chrome It won't come back initial state. It just runs slow. But after it restart then everything is back to normal.

My laptop has ssd & normal hdd.
So anyone have a clue why this is happening?

Thanks
 

britechguy

Commendable
Jul 2, 2019
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Over how long a period of time? If this is after sleeping it twice or three times in one day, that's odd, if this is after sleeping it that many or more times for days in a row or longer, it's really not.

It is a bad idea to sleep a computer repeatedly for many weeks, just as it's a bad idea to hibernate a machine over and over and over again. Fast Startup under Windows 10 can also be problematic, too.

You do occasionally need to restart a computer.
 
Aug 5, 2019
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Over how long a period of time? If this is after sleeping it twice or three times in one day, that's odd, if this is after sleeping it that many or more times for days in a row or longer, it's really not.

It is a bad idea to sleep a computer repeatedly for many weeks, just as it's a bad idea to hibernate a machine over and over and over again. Fast Startup under Windows 10 can also be problematic, too.

You do occasionally need to restart a computer.
I make it sleep for 3-4 times a day without rebooting or shutdown. I continue this way for couple of days until I couldn't use it as normal speed any longer.
 

britechguy

Commendable
Jul 2, 2019
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Is there any reason you couldn't just not sleep it at all?

If it's connected to AC power all (or at least the vast majority) of the time you could set it up to just have the screen turn off, but not sleep.

I have generally found that repeated "power state changes," whether sleep or hibernate, tend to lead to poor performance over time. I don't sleep my machines at all when they are connected to AC power, only if I will be using them under battery power and it will be a while between the time I put them to sleep and will use them again. If that's a really long time then I hibernate.

But as a general rule I leave my machines that I use all the time running 24/7 when connected to AC power.
 
turn off Fast Startup and actually shut it down. see if that fixes things. you should never just keep the computer always on and only let it sleep, it gets really wonky over time when you do that. shut it down when not in use and let it sleep the right way.
 
Aug 5, 2019
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turn off Fast Startup and actually shut it down. see if that fixes things. you should never just keep the computer always on and only let it sleep, it gets really wonky over time when you do that. shut it down when not in use and let it sleep the right way.
Thank you
 
Aug 5, 2019
5
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10
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Is there any reason you couldn't just not sleep it at all?

If it's connected to AC power all (or at least the vast majority) of the time you could set it up to just have the screen turn off, but not sleep.

I have generally found that repeated "power state changes," whether sleep or hibernate, tend to lead to poor performance over time. I don't sleep my machines at all when they are connected to AC power, only if I will be using them under battery power and it will be a while between the time I put them to sleep and will use them again. If that's a really long time then I hibernate.

But as a general rule I leave my machines that I use all the time running 24/7 when connected to AC power.
There is no special reason. I do that because in the morning I can continue my design work where I stopped rather than opening them all over again. :D
 

britechguy

Commendable
Jul 2, 2019
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Well, if the objective is to pick up where you left off, simply allowing the machine to run normally but have a screen turn-off set to some interval that's reasonable to you in Power Options is definitely the fastest way to go and one that will not create performance problems as rapidly.

I'll often have machines that have been running for weeks between restarts without any noticeable changes in behavior. And that's a big change since Windows 8.1 and later. I never used to be able to run as long as I do now under Windows 7 and earlier as something would always get wonky/cranky after a couple of days, at most.
 
Aug 5, 2019
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Well, if the objective is to pick up where you left off, simply allowing the machine to run normally but have a screen turn-off set to some interval that's reasonable to you in Power Options is definitely the fastest way to go and one that will not create performance problems as rapidly.

I'll often have machines that have been running for weeks between restarts without any noticeable changes in behavior. And that's a big change since Windows 8.1 and later. I never used to be able to run as long as I do now under Windows 7 and earlier as something would always get wonky/cranky after a couple of days, at most.
Well, if the objective is to pick up where you left off, simply allowing the machine to run normally but have a screen turn-off set to some interval that's reasonable to you in Power Options is definitely the fastest way to go and one that will not create performance problems as rapidly.

I'll often have machines that have been running for weeks between restarts without any noticeable changes in behavior. And that's a big change since Windows 8.1 and later. I never used to be able to run as long as I do now under Windows 7 and earlier as something would always get wonky/cranky after a couple of days, at most.
Thank you. I'll try it.
 

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