Question Why do I get low frame rates?

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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Download HWinfo. Install it. Run it and select the "Sensors only" option. Unselect the "Summary" option. Take screenshots of ALL the sensor fields with the system at complete idle, which means you will need to start HWinfo and then let the system "rest" with no other programs, browsers, etc., running for about five minutes. There will be some few background processes but that's fine. We know that. It usually takes about three screenshots to capture all the sensors.

Then, run your game, with HWinfo open, take another set of screenshots of the HWinfo sensors while running your game OR while running Furmark or Heaven benchmark.

Post both sets of screenshots here by uploading the images to a hosting site like imgur.com and then copy/paste the "for direct layouts" link here using the insert image button on the formatting toolbar in between the smiley face and chain link.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
You have some, unusual ideas or beliefs, or something. I assure you, facing that PSU down is the way it is supposed to be, and besides which your power supply has ZERO to do with the temperature of anything else inside the case including the graphics card, CPU, motherboard or anything else. Nothing. At all.

The ONLY way your power supply could have ANYTHING to do with those temperatures would be if it (Wrongly) was being used as the ONLY exhaust fan for the case, and if that is what's going on then the problem isn't with facing the PSU the correct way, the problem is you need exhaust fans installed.

The bottom of that case is SPECIFICALLY designed and intended to filter dust out of the air going INTO the power supply, which means the big round fan on your power supply is supposed to be facing DOWN towards that filter. Power supplies bring air IN through the big hole and out through the back where the PSU bolts up to the case at.

Looking at your latest picture, it looks like you might have some cables pinched in there between the power supply and the bottom of the case, because I can see yellow wiring through the grill in the bottom and there shouldn't be ANYTHING there except the intake fan side of the power supply and the case/intake filter. It might just be the picture, but it sure looks like there is wiring stuck there between them.

What is your case model and how many fans are installed? WHERE is each fan installed and what direction, in or out of the case, is EACH and EVERY fan blowing. Only include case fans, not the CPU cooler or the power supply or the graphics card. Just case fans.
 
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There are no cables stuck underneath, I can assure you.
I have 2 cooler master fans inside, one blowing out and one blowing in.
One is attached on the top of the case, and one is attached on the back.
All fans are fully operational.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That configuration is wrong too. Top and rear fans should ALL be exhaust fans. Front, bottom and side case fans should ALL be intake. It's no wonder your system gets hot, it's not getting adequate airflow. I suspect though that you'll disagree that that is correct as well so to be honest I think I'm done here and somebody else can hopefully help out.

This is what your cooling configuration, EVERY cooling configuration, using an ATX case with a bottom mounted power supply, should look like.

 
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I'm sorry if I have come of as rude or irratated, that is definitely not my intention.
I had no idea that there was a set way to put your fans, and I'll adjust them as I change the PSU.
I really do value your input and you have been of great help to me, I'm sorry that my frustration has been showing quite alot.
I been wanting to upgrade my computer for so long now, and I lack the knowledge to understand whatwas wrong.
Again, I'm sorry.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok, so let's start at the beginning. I asked this before but I do not believe I ever got an answer.

What is your exact case model? I think you mentioned something about Be Quiet, but they make a lot of cases so unfortunately that's not terribly helpful. Seeing a picture of the front of the case, or checking to see if you have the model information somewhere, would be really helpful. It's hard to help with the cooling configuration without knowing what case we are working with.

The bottom line is going to be that at the very least you will probably want to move that top fan to the front as an intake, and leave the rear fan as an exhaust.
 
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I have been looking for any kind of name on it, but the only thing I could find is the serial number o.o
I'll look through my papers to see if I can find anything though ^^

Alright, I'll do just that :)
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
It would be a very good idea, if possible based on the case configuration, to simply leave the rear and top exhaust fans (And DO verify that they are exhaust fans, blowing OUT of the case) in the rear and top-rear positions, and just get two more fans and install them in the front as intake fans, at some point anyhow. For now, I'd move that fan to the front-bottom location as an intake fan and leave the fan as exhaust that is at the back of the case towards the top. AND also turn that PSU back over so that it is installed correctly.
 

JohnBonhamsGhost

Reputable
Jan 14, 2016
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can you pick the case from a lineup?

BeQuiet.com - PC Cases

considering you have one of these;
the newer BeQuiet "Base" series cases are fairly similar with their airflow options. one front intake and one rear outtake should be the optimal solution for now.

i would really recommend getting at least two, if possible three intakes from the front.
one top outtake towards the rear directly under the top vents.
and one rear outake. make sure your CPU cooler's fan(s) are pointed towards the rear outtake fan.

these "Base" series do not have the best airflow from the front as the side vents are partially obstructed. and the top slits do not allow much air out of the top. it took me a few rearrangements using the Dark Base 700 to get my temps back to what i had grown used to with other cases and my 280mm liquid cooler.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ghost, not to be nitpicky, but there is no such thing as "outtake" fans. There are intake fans, and exhaust fans, and for the sake of avoiding any misinterpretation, confusion or transferring of bad habits upon less experienced users, it would be best to stick to the proper terminology so they don't go elsewhere and say "Well, those guys at Tom's said it was called outtake". It's not. It's exhaust.

There is only ONE definition of an "outtake", and it's this:

a scene or sequence filmed or recorded for a movie or program but not included in the final version.
 

JohnBonhamsGhost

Reputable
Jan 14, 2016
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Ghost, not to be nitpicky
that's funny you say, "not to be nitpicky". are you also going to go through threads and correct every statement using some type of undefined ebonic term and/or some new paraphrase you've never heard?
the opposite of "in" is "out", the meaning is very clear. whether it has been documented in a publicated dictionary or some wikipedia article or not. this use of "outtake" will always make sense when used in this context, no matter where it is used. you would have to have serious mental conceptual problems to really take this as meaning; "cut audio or video content" fans.

stating to users that you believe they should use "proper terminology" is fine. but i would say it's more of a bad habit to interrupt a help thread with that kind of post.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No, but I am going to correct the ones I see in the threads I participate in. Part of our job here is to correct misinformation. If you have a problem with me correcting yours, then you have a few choices but I don't think you're likely to like any of them. It has nothing really to do with "proper terminology" and everything to do with using terminology that flat out does not exist except by way of usage of a very few people here and there who manage to mangle some hybridized version of intake into outake when talking about exhaust.

So, you could either call it what it is, which is exhaust, or you could simply not post in those kind of threads. Further options include having me post this information every time I see you using the non-existent terminology, wrongly, or complaining to the community manager that I corrected you for using terminology that doesn't exist. Honestly, any of them is fine with me. If you think correcting misinformation is a worse offense than posting misinformation, and yes, using terminology that does not exist IS in fact misinformation, then you are indeed a seriously confused individual, but to each their own I suppose. I assure you that there are NO persons with any legitimate hardware experience as a builder or enthusiast who use the terminology "outtake" to describe exhaust fans. It is a clear identifier to most of us, of somebody who is either heavily lacking in experience or for whom English is not a first language, in which case it becomes all the most important, for their benefit, to correct the misuse of the terminology so as not to be guilty of helping spread the faulty nomenclature.
 
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Alright!
I thought that I had replied, but I must have forgotten to.
I have fixed the fans now, I have gotten a new PSU:
RM750x

But the problem is exactly the same...
I don't understand..
 

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