Question why do i have a good pc yet i have really varying frame rates and games are not rendering properly. not getting nearly as much fps as i should be.

Sep 26, 2020
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games like cs sometimes get stuttering and also games with large open worlds such as rust and pubg/fortnite. i have really varying frames in fortnite and rust usually 80 but then when i get to a part of the map that gets more complicated and has a lot more different textures I get like 160 at least and this barely changes if I turn up grahics settings.. i dont think that its my gpu, mb a cpu problem but im not sure i have a near brand new gtx 1660ti oc xlerate, ryzen 5 1600x gigabyte b450 aurus elite. 16gb of ddr4 2400 and 3600mhz ram. one of them is a 8gb stick of hyperx rgb and the other is corsair vengance.
 

PC Tailor

Judicious
Ambassador
Welcome to the forums!

  • What is your monitor refresh rate and resolution?
  • Have you installed all latest drivers (including GPU and Chipset without using a driver updater app/software) ?
  • Have you monitored GPU and CPU temps under load?
  • Do you have latest BIOS?
16gb of ddr4 2400 and 3600mhz ram. one of them is a 8gb stick of hyperx rgb and the other is corsair vengance.
There is another problem - you've not only mixed RAM modules (which can cause instability) but you've also mixed timings/speeds, so your 3600 is likely sittting at 2400, have you checked in the BIOS?
 
Reactions: Phaaze88
Sep 26, 2020
11
0
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Welcome to the forums!

  • What is your monitor refresh rate and resolution?
  • Have you installed all latest drivers (including GPU and Chipset without using a driver updater app/software) ?
  • Have you monitored GPU and CPU temps under load?
  • Do you have latest BIOS?
There is another problem - you've not only mixed RAM modules (which can cause instability) but you've also mixed timings/speeds, so your 3600 is likely sittting at 2400, have you checked in the BIOS?
the thing is I believe that my ram sticks are in separate channels, so they are running separately, which is why I thought it wouldn't be a problem. also if I do remove one it just makes performance even worse. In your opinion how many frames should I be getting with that hardware if nothing was wrong with it, say on rust or csgo? thanks for replying ill check the bios and stuff, my gpu drivers are indeed updated and I don't know how to update the chipset.
 
Sep 26, 2020
11
0
10
0
Welcome to the forums!

  • What is your monitor refresh rate and resolution?
  • Have you installed all latest drivers (including GPU and Chipset without using a driver updater app/software) ?
  • Have you monitored GPU and CPU temps under load?
  • Do you have latest BIOS?
There is another problem - you've not only mixed RAM modules (which can cause instability) but you've also mixed timings/speeds, so your 3600 is likely sittting at 2400, have you checked in the BIOS?
THANK YOU FOR THE REPLY!
 

PC Tailor

Judicious
Ambassador
also if I do remove one it just makes performance even worse.
Yes because you'll then be reducing your RAM size. What you need is to buy ONE PACK of 2x8GB 3200 (at least) RAM. Without the two you currently have, RAM is sold in packs for a reason.

In your opinion how many frames should I be getting with that hardware if nothing was wrong with it
Maybe an unpopular opinion, but I won't really answer this one. Simply because if I did have an opinion, many then expect that as a benchmark, but also because frankly, no one can ever know, no two systems are the same, there are so many variables that dictate your FPS, many in your system I likely won't be aware of.

On top of that, it entirely depends on how you are using your system as well as your monitor resolution and refresh rate.
 
Sep 26, 2020
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Yes because you'll then be reducing your RAM size. What you need is to buy ONE PACK of 2x8GB 3200 (at least) RAM. Without the two you currently have, RAM is sold in packs for a reason.


Maybe an unpopular opinion, but I won't really answer this one. Simply because if I did have an opinion, many then expect that as a benchmark, but also because frankly, no one can ever know, no two systems are the same, there are so many variables that dictate your FPS, many in your system I likely won't be aware of.

On top of that, it entirely depends on how you are using your system as well as your monitor resolution and refresh rate.
ok so what is a workaround for having 2 different ram sticks in my pc without removing one and ruining performance completely? while i don't have any lying around that is, i will buy some when i can.
 

PC Tailor

Judicious
Ambassador
ok so what is a workaround for having 2 different ram sticks in my pc without removing one and ruining performance completely? while i don't have any lying around that is, i will buy some when i can.
There isn't. And there is no guarantee that it is indeed mixed modules the root cause of your problem, but it very commonly can be. The way to prevent this is to get modules that were manufactured and tested to be compatible with one another unfortunately.

All it is, until we remove that from the list of suspects, it would be scatter-gunning other potential issues.

so they are running separatel
Problem is by being in different channels they are not running separately, they are still managed and controlled by the same hardware, they just have increased bandwidth.

You also still haven't clarified your monitor refresh rate and resolution?
 
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Sep 26, 2020
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There isn't. And there is no guarantee that it is indeed mixed modules the root cause of your problem, but it very commonly can be. The way to prevent this is to get modules that were manufactured and tested to be compatible with one another unfortunately.

All it is, until we remove that from the list of suspects, it would be scatter-gunning other potential issues.


Problem is by being in different channels they are not running separately, they are still managed and controlled by the same hardware, they just have increased bandwidth.

You also still haven't clarified your monitor refresh rate and resolution?
yes sorry my res is 1920x1080 at 144hz
 
Sep 26, 2020
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There isn't. And there is no guarantee that it is indeed mixed modules the root cause of your problem, but it very commonly can be. The way to prevent this is to get modules that were manufactured and tested to be compatible with one another unfortunately.

All it is, until we remove that from the list of suspects, it would be scatter-gunning other potential issues.


Problem is by being in different channels they are not running separately, they are still managed and controlled by the same hardware, they just have increased bandwidth.

You also still haven't clarified your monitor refresh rate and resolution?
also I checked and it was running at 2400 but when I removed the one that was slower, I put it back to 3600 for the faster one and I crashed so...
 

jasonf2

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Turn your monitor refresh back down. That 1060ti cannot hold hold 144hz (fps) in your games and what you are describing sounds like screen tearing. The other thing is simply this. You obviously have mix and match ram and you are playing with clock timings. Set them back to Auto and see if you stabilize. Advertised "tested" frequency on RAM sticks is in my experience an absolutely best case scenario and not always, if rarely attainable by real people in real world. SPD settings are there because they actually work without any tweaking in pretty much all scenarios. Just because the thing boots doesn't mean it is stable, and when it is on the edge you will get video destabilization, random program crashes, BSOD and freezes all on their own intermittently. The only way to validate stable is through testing over hours or days with zero errors in a memory test utility. Regardless if you are going to mix and match sticks run them at SPD settings unless you are an experienced RAM overclocker and tediously patient.
 
You can run cpu-z and check on the memory tab under channel it will tell you if you run single or double,often you get double even with different modules.
i have really varying frames in fortnite and rust usually 80 but then when i get to a part of the map that gets more complicated and has a lot more different textures I get like 160 at least
On open spaces where nothing is happening the game can use all cores and give you high FPS, when stuff is happening and multiple players are on screen it's very important to keep track of when people do what so the game runs stuff on a single core so that the game will get one accurate result.
 
Sep 26, 2020
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Turn your monitor refresh back down. That 1060ti cannot hold hold 144hz (fps) in your games and what you are describing sounds like screen tearing. The other thing is simply this. You obviously have mix and match ram and you are playing with clock timings. Set them back to Auto and see if you stabilize. Advertised "tested" frequency on RAM sticks is in my experience an absolutely best case scenario and not always, if rarely attainable by real people in real world. SPD settings are there because they actually work without any tweaking in pretty much all scenarios. Just because the thing boots doesn't mean it is stable, and when it is on the edge you will get video destabilization, random program crashes, BSOD and freezes all on their own intermittently. The only way to validate stable is through testing over hours or days with zero errors in a memory test utility. Regardless if you are going to mix and match sticks run them at SPD settings unless you are an experienced RAM overclocker and tediously patient.
i have a 1660ti first of all, and I did set it to auto, it automatically clocks down anyway when you pug in a lower ram speed so what do you mean lol. also I dojnt think you have the slightest idea what you are talking about, the 1060ti doesn't exist, and even so the 1060 is a very decent card which can run 144 in a lot of games.
 
Sep 26, 2020
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You can run cpu-z and check on the memory tab under channel it will tell you if you run single or double,often you get double even with different modules.

On open spaces where nothing is happening the game can use all cores and give you high FPS, when stuff is happening and multiple players are on screen it's very important to keep track of when people do what so the game runs stuff on a single core so that the game will get one accurate result.
thank you for actually trying to help, I was trying to figure that out for ages
 
Sep 26, 2020
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There isn't. And there is no guarantee that it is indeed mixed modules the root cause of your problem, but it very commonly can be. The way to prevent this is to get modules that were manufactured and tested to be compatible with one another unfortunately.

All it is, until we remove that from the list of suspects, it would be scatter-gunning other potential issues.


Problem is by being in different channels they are not running separately, they are still managed and controlled by the same hardware, they just have increased bandwidth.

You also still haven't clarified your monitor refresh rate and resolution?
yo
 

jasonf2

Honorable
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<Moderator deleted personal attack>
I typoed the card. Sorry. Please check your benchmarks on it, as I actually did. Unless the monitor is running something like Gsync to smooth it out the listed card above will not reliably maintain a frame rate at least equal to the baseline frequency of the monitor which will cause screen tearing and lag. I have been worked computer tech support as far back as Compaq in the mid 90s and am very familiar with overclocks all of the way back into the 8088 days. The only way to test out a RAM configuration is to run something like xmem86(+) for an extended period of time and validate stability not simply getting the machine to boot. I have personally had to work through the difficulties of RAM issues many times and was genuinely trying to help. The comment was uncalled for and very rude. Best of luck fixing your machine on your own.
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Your two DIMMs should be installed in THESE two slots, no exceptions, so long as you are running ANY modern dual channel, four DIMM slot consumer motherboard. If you are running a quad channel or HEDT (High end desktop) platform, then population rules will be different since there are going to be 8 DIMM slots.




As far as determining whether the memory configuration is stable or not, that, is for the most part, fairly uncomplicated.

Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.


Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86. Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


You CAN use Memtest86+, as they've recently updated the program after MANY years of no updates, but for the purpose of this guide I recommend using the Passmark version as this is a tried and true utility while I've not had the opportunity to investigate the reliability of the latest 86+ release as compared to Memtest86. Possibly, consider using Memtest86+ as simply a secondary test to Memtest86, much as Windows memory diagnostic utility and Prime95 Blend or custom modes can be used for a second opinion utility.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.
 
Sep 26, 2020
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Your two DIMMs should be installed in THESE two slots, no exceptions, so long as you are running ANY modern dual channel, four DIMM slot consumer motherboard. If you are running a quad channel or HEDT (High end desktop) platform, then population rules will be different since there are going to be 8 DIMM slots.




As far as determining whether the memory configuration is stable or not, that, is for the most part, fairly uncomplicated.

Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.


Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86. Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


You CAN use Memtest86+, as they've recently updated the program after MANY years of no updates, but for the purpose of this guide I recommend using the Passmark version as this is a tried and true utility while I've not had the opportunity to investigate the reliability of the latest 86+ release as compared to Memtest86. Possibly, consider using Memtest86+ as simply a secondary test to Memtest86, much as Windows memory diagnostic utility and Prime95 Blend or custom modes can be used for a second opinion utility.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.
m8 this is so complicated and also kinda sus ngl
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If that is too complicated for you, then you will want to take your system to somebody who it is not too complicated for, because that exact set of instructions has been LITERALLY used to help thousands of visitors to this site and this is the first time anybody has said it was too complicated for them. Sorry, but it is the absolute truth.
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
1660 ti can absolutely handle 144hz 1080p gaming, assuming a willingness to drop a few settings down, IF you have a capable enough CPU, since that is probably going to be the bottleneck in most cases anyhow where high frame rates are preferred over eye candy. Turning down quality settings does no good at all if you don't have a CPU that can handle the increased demand.
 

jasonf2

Honorable
Oct 11, 2015
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Im sure a 1660 ti can hold 144 fps in CS, pal
I am just going to get flamed all over the place here but I am a glutton for punishment. The games listed @ 1080 were CS (Userbench mark average FPS 156), Rust (61.4 FPS), PUBG (88.4 FPS), Fortnight (132 FPS). While these are average user benchmarks with limited sample and various CPUs I would say it is pretty indicative of what the card is going to do in real life. Anytime frame rate and refresh rate get out of sync you can expect screen tearing and/or lag. Screen tearing has been more emphasized when you are dealing with a super fast video card overproducing frames against a monitor refresh, but it happens both ways and is really why G-sync and Freesync technologies were developed. In a perfect world FPS and monitor refresh should be kept equal with no FPS variability. In the real world machine workloads vary and cause FPS to move around during gameplay. Getting out of sync and lag happens worse at certain points of FPS to refresh because of the fixed refresh nature of the monitor. Lets say that you have a 144hz monitor. Perfect would be a 144 FPS input that is rock stable. But lets say that you go down to exactly 72 FPS rock stable (1/2 Refresh). At this level the monitor will just refresh the input frame 2x and there isn't a tearing issue because they are in sync and the image is just doubled up. This may be perceived as lag however. On the other hand as we start to get away from the even multiplier what happens is that we start to have frames produced that are not in ratio with the refresh being rendered on the screen. So for example at 108 FPS on the example monitor for every monitor refresh we are making .75 images per refresh cycle. Trying to render the partial image causes an intermittent "tear" in the screen image. The same thing happens in reverse when we try to push too many frames into lower refresh monitors as they get out of sync. Faster refresh monitors cover the effect better because they are faster, but the effect happens both ways. Gysnc and Freesync tech work to keep the FPS and refresh either equal or out of the problem ratio areas. Lets talk about this particular issue at hand. The 1660 TI as per its "60" moniker is at the lower end of the Nvidia discrete graphics card lineup. The 1600 series on a whole was released concurrently with the 2000 series to cover entry level to low mid level consumers with the 2000 series covering mid upper and upper segments. As a value proposition it is a great card but it is still a value card. At 1080 it can play any of the games listed at the frame rates listed above, which are just fine and solid framerates on a normal 60 hz monitor. But a high refresh monitor even at lower res like 1080 will see some screen tearing and lag under normal circumstances on this card especially when turned to ultra mode in games. Just how much I cannot say, and I also cannot qualify how bad his issue is. This discussion was opened specifically trying to troubleshoot a stuttering issue in those games and the capable framerate to refresh rate mismatch would lead me to testing a lower refresh and framerate cap to see if it helps. In my opinion (besides possible RAM instability in this case) the issue here is mismatched hardware on a whole. A decent CPU coupled with middle run entry level GPU trying to push a really fast monitor that would have been better served by a higher 2000 series card and gsync. I know that there is a gross price difference between the two, but baring hardware problems I think that on some level here expectations need to be tempered a bit. You get what you pay for.
 

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