[SOLVED] Why do people hate RTX 2060?

Sarveshix

Commendable
May 4, 2017
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1,510
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RTX 2060 was launched for 349$ and the GTX 1060 6GB was launced for 249$. They belong to different price segments so dont even compare them. RTX 2060 is priced near GTX 1070 (379$). The RTX 2060 not only smacks down the GTX 1070 but it also matches/beats GTX 1070 Ti (449$) while being 22% cheaper. Its a good incremental upgrade. Then why are people underwhelmed by the 2060?
 

Aeacus

Glorious
Herald
Well, how about the reason that starting from beginning, Nvidia has named their GPUs as GT and GTX, never RTX.

E.g: Kepler architecture models are GTX 760, GTX 770, GTX 780 etc. Next, Maxwell architecture models are GTX 960, GTX 970, GTX 980 etc. After Maxwell, Pascal architecture models are GTX 1060, GTX 1070, GTX 1080 etc. Since everybody are used with GTX and there were hopes that Turing architecture GPUs would be named GTX 1160, GTX 1170, GTX 1180 etc.
Nice and simple, right?

But Nvidia threw an oddball and named Turing GPUs as 2060, 2070, 2080 etc and not the known GTX but RTX instead. What's up with that?

Also, Nvidia has since released filler GPUs between GTX 1050, GTX 1060 and GTX 1070 but did Nvida named them as GTX 1150, GTX 1160, GTX 1170? No.
Nvidia named them GTX 1650, GTX 1660, GTX 1660 Ti instead.

Oh, Nvidia also launched the refresh versions of RTX series GPUs but rather than calling them as Ti versions (e.g GTX 1070 -> GTX 1070 Ti) like all refresh GPUs have been since then, they instead call them as "Super". E.g RTX 2060 -> RTX 2060 Super.

And now, the GPU lineup, Pascal + Turing (from weakest to best, while excluding GT and Titan GPUs) is this: GTX 1050, GTX 1050 Ti, GTX 1650, GTX 1060 3GB, GTX 1060 6GB, GTX 1660, GTX 1660 Ti, GTX 1070, RTX 2060, GTX 1070 Ti, GTX 1080, RTX 2060 Super, RTX 2070, RTX 2070 Super, RTX 2080, GTX 1080 Ti, RTX 2080 Super, RTX 2080 Ti.

It's all about the naming scheme. If you change the naming and confuse the people, you'd get a lot of hate. And here is your answer. Since RTX 2060 is the 1st GPU with the new naming scheme, it also got a lot of hate.
 
RTX 2060 was launched for 349$ and the GTX 1060 6GB was launced for 249$. They belong to different price segments so dont even compare them. RTX 2060 is priced near GTX 1070 (379$). The RTX 2060 not only smacks down the GTX 1070 but it also matches/beats GTX 1070 Ti (449$) while being 22% cheaper. Its a good incremental upgrade. Then why are people underwhelmed by the 2060?
Performance per dollar is expected to increase over time. The 2060 launched 2.5 years after the 1060, and offered ~50-60% more performance for 40% more money. So barely an increase in perf/$. A 1060 and a 760 had roughly the same time between launches (3 years), but instead you got over double the performance for the same price. It's the same story for most of the Geforce 20 cards, at least at launch prices. They increased performance but also increased price, to the point where they didn't offer significantly better perf/$ than previous gen parts. People were disappointed by long wait and lacklustre value.
 
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I don't think people "hated" the 2060. As far as the RTX cards go, the 2060 actually offered the best value of the bunch at the time it launched. The higher-end models like the 2070 and 2080 were even less well-received, as those offered barely any more performance than their 10-series equivalents, and at higher prices, resulting in worse performance-per-dollar than their predecessors.

Another thing to consider is that Nvidia stagnated on their 10-series cards for much longer than usual, so even if a card like a 2060 offered better performance than a 1070 at a slightly lower launch price, we're only talking about a 15-20% performance gain, 2.5 years after that card came out. That's not impressive at all compared to many prior generations of graphics cards. After that long, that kind of performance should have been expected in the sub-$300 price range. Plus, it offers less VRAM than a 1070, something that might not be ideal for 1440p gaming a couple years down the line.

And of course, raytracing, the headlining feature of the RTX series, was a complete no-show for months after the cards launched. Even now, 10-months after the 2080 and 2080 Ti came out, there are still only three proper games that have had raytraced lighting effects added. And the effects essentially ruin performance in those games for relatively minor improvements in visuals, especially when it comes to the 2060, which can't even manage 60fps at 1080p with them enabled. And then there's DLSS, which amounted to little more than an upscaling method that doesn't even look or perform quite as well as other upscaling methods. These features could end up being really good in a new generation of hardware that can properly support them, but the 20-series doesn't seem to have enough hardware resources to make them work all that well.

At this point though, with AMD's new cards launching and Nvidia's "Super" cards coming out to counter them, prices are getting a bit more in line with people's expectations for what a new generation of cards should offer. 2070-level performance can be had for around $400 now, and I wouldn't be surprised if 2060-level performance drops to around $300 soon.
 
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Sarveshix

Commendable
May 4, 2017
7
0
1,510
0
Well, how about the reason that starting from beginning, Nvidia has named their GPUs as GT and GTX, never RTX.

E.g: Kepler architecture models are GTX 760, GTX 770, GTX 780 etc. Next, Maxwell architecture models are GTX 960, GTX 970, GTX 980 etc. After Maxwell, Pascal architecture models are GTX 1060, GTX 1070, GTX 1080 etc. Since everybody are used with GTX and there were hopes that Turing architecture GPUs would be named GTX 1160, GTX 1170, GTX 1180 etc.
Nice and simple, right?

But Nvidia threw an oddball and named Turing GPUs as 2060, 2070, 2080 etc and not the known GTX but RTX instead. What's up with that?

Also, Nvidia has since released filler GPUs between GTX 1050, GTX 1060 and GTX 1070 but did Nvida named them as GTX 1150, GTX 1160, GTX 1170? No.
Nvidia named them GTX 1650, GTX 1660, GTX 1660 Ti instead.

Oh, Nvidia also launched the refresh versions of RTX series GPUs but rather than calling them as Ti versions (e.g GTX 1070 -> GTX 1070 Ti) like all refresh GPUs have been since then, they instead call them as "Super". E.g RTX 2060 -> RTX 2060 Super.

And now, the GPU lineup, Pascal + Turing (from weakest to best, while excluding GT and Titan GPUs) is this: GTX 1050, GTX 1050 Ti, GTX 1650, GTX 1060 3GB, GTX 1060 6GB, GTX 1660, GTX 1660 Ti, GTX 1070, RTX 2060, GTX 1070 Ti, GTX 1080, RTX 2060 Super, RTX 2070, RTX 2070 Super, RTX 2080, GTX 1080 Ti, RTX 2080 Super, RTX 2080 Ti.

It's all about the naming scheme. If you change the naming and confuse the people, you'd get a lot of hate. And here is your answer. Since RTX 2060 is the 1st GPU with the new naming scheme, it also got a lot of hate.

LOL. Xbox > Xbox 360 > Xbox One.
ALL HAIL SHELDON xD
 
well if you ask me some people simply does not like the 2060 because the price is not $250 (or even lower) like previous gen x60 cards. but then again people always complaining haha. remember when nvidia have some sort of GPU shortage because of mining? many said nvidia did nothing to solve the supply issue causing the crazy price hike. and then when the mining bubble burst nvidia end up with more cards on the channel causing the delay for turing they say nvidia greediness during the mining bloom cause the issue when they over produce their pascal cards. so...well yeah. it is simply how it is. even if nvidia price RTX2060 at 250 i dare to bet some people will still going to complain....like how those RT cores are useless on such card and it will be cheaper like 150 cheaper if RT cores does not exist lol.
 

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