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[SOLVED] Why is it underperforming?

Toni Vicente

Honorable
Oct 13, 2013
78
1
10,635
0
Hi,
I did a CPU-z benchmark and my cpu (437 points) don't reach the reference (509), It's the reference model overclocked?
....
Sadly, no motherboard BIOS seems to be set up with proper default settings. And then many times BIOS needs updating anyway, so be sure your BIOS is updated to the latest with AGESA 1004b at least.

Once that's done download and install the AMD chipset drivers from the AMD web site to make sure you have the latest. The drivers will install a Ryzen Balanced power plan; run that and do not make changes to processor power states.

Then, in BIOS, make sure the following are ENABLED: AMD CoolnQuiet, Global C States, Processor CPPC and CPPC Preferred Cores. Don't leave those in Auto or Default as that's many times the same as Disabled.

Also make sure VCore voltage is set to AUTO as well as CPU Multiplier or Clock. You don't want to take them off Auto unless you're extremely careful. Fixed CPU multiplier or voltage can lead to degradation with 3rd gen if not done carefully.

Now setting PBO to AUTO should get you pretty good scores but the better scores are achieved only by tweaking PBO: try these settings PPT=333, EDC and TDC = 230 and PBO Scalar between 5x and 10x. For some reason that works in most cases to improve scores but there are other tweaks that can get the very best out of your processor and you'll see those at the top in online databases.

The last (or maybe first) way to get better scores is to put in some really good cooling for the CPU and case. Ryzen 3000 CPU's really love lower temps as they hold higher clocks under heavy processing loads and return better multi-threaded scores. A 240mm AIO will just multiply the effect of PBO for the very best scores.
 
Reactions: Toni Vicente
Hi,
I did a CPU-z benchmark and my cpu (437 points) don't reach the reference (509), It's the reference model overclocked?
....
Sadly, no motherboard BIOS seems to be set up with proper default settings. And then many times BIOS needs updating anyway, so be sure your BIOS is updated to the latest with AGESA 1004b at least.

Once that's done download and install the AMD chipset drivers from the AMD web site to make sure you have the latest. The drivers will install a Ryzen Balanced power plan; run that and do not make changes to processor power states.

Then, in BIOS, make sure the following are ENABLED: AMD CoolnQuiet, Global C States, Processor CPPC and CPPC Preferred Cores. Don't leave those in Auto or Default as that's many times the same as Disabled.

Also make sure VCore voltage is set to AUTO as well as CPU Multiplier or Clock. You don't want to take them off Auto unless you're extremely careful. Fixed CPU multiplier or voltage can lead to degradation with 3rd gen if not done carefully.

Now setting PBO to AUTO should get you pretty good scores but the better scores are achieved only by tweaking PBO: try these settings PPT=333, EDC and TDC = 230 and PBO Scalar between 5x and 10x. For some reason that works in most cases to improve scores but there are other tweaks that can get the very best out of your processor and you'll see those at the top in online databases.

The last (or maybe first) way to get better scores is to put in some really good cooling for the CPU and case. Ryzen 3000 CPU's really love lower temps as they hold higher clocks under heavy processing loads and return better multi-threaded scores. A 240mm AIO will just multiply the effect of PBO for the very best scores.
 
Reactions: Toni Vicente

Toni Vicente

Honorable
Oct 13, 2013
78
1
10,635
0
Ok, thanks for answers, I going to check all.

Numbering your paragraphs so I don't forget anything...

1. Bios update, this was done:
v3.60 (1.0.0.5)

2. AMD chipset, I did that:
AMD Chipset Drivers Revision Number 2.04.04.111 (from AMD web)
AMD Chipset Drivers 19.10.36 (Info from dragon center)
AMD Ryzen Master 2.1.1.1472 (from AMD web)
Ryzen Balanced plan is this?



3. I had left that on auto.

4. That was in auto previously.

5. Wait, then CPU-Z is showing a 3700x overclocked?

Ok, Now is similar to 3700x:
https://valid.x86.fr/bench/zu6jla/1

I did two profiles, point 1 to 4 "soft overcloking", point 1 to 5 "hard overcloking" (because manual PBO config)

About temp, I had this before of set point 3 to enable (I set that in AUTO previously):


My actual cooler is an AMD Wraith. I have saved a Cooler Master Hyper T4 from my anterior i5 4670 cpu.
 
.....
My actual cooler is an AMD Wraith. I have saved a Cooler Master Hyper T4 from my anterior i5 4670 cpu.
So it looks like your good now with performance? I think so...you're certainly looking good in CPUz at least!

And yes, I think the leaders in those online charts often are overclocked. That makes it hard to use them for comparisons. But if you're getting close to them then you should feel like you're not leaving performance on the table and be satisfied with it.
 
Reactions: Toni Vicente

Toni Vicente

Honorable
Oct 13, 2013
78
1
10,635
0
I don't understand why when I login in windows, fan is speeding up and down continuously, seems related with fluctiations on cpu core voltage. I don't see speed control in ryzen master.
I must enter in dragon center to load a profile, bios fans control don't have effect in win10, then fan control is loaded rightly
 
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I don't understand why when I login in windows, fan is speeding up and down continuously, seems related with fluctiations on cpu core voltage. I don't see speed control in ryzen master.
I must enter in dragon center to load a profile, bios fans control don't have effect in win10, then fan control is loaded rightly
It's because of the way Ryzen works...from idle it will boost a single core to very high clock to get even a short process done as quickly as possible then go back to idle. Each time it boosts it briefly raises the temp in one core of the CPU, the 'hot spot'. It only reports the one hotspot of all the temp sensors scattered around the die so it pulses up and down like that with each little background process Windows runs. And Windows has a lot of them.

Those temp spikes don't add much to the thermal state of the whole package, though, so it's not really important until they start coming continuously as when running a truly intense, multicore and long running process. So you should look at an average temperature reading in HWInfo or Ryzenmaster software to see the true thermal state. Also, to keep fans from pulsing don't track the pulses by setting a really loose profile up to about 70C then ramp up from there.

Also, voltage will also fluctuate with each boost since it needs higher voltage to run at the boost clock speed. So that's normal too. You can expect it to spike voltage up to as high as 1.5V during one of the boosts, that's perfectly normal and to be expected. It may seem high but it's very brief and is immediately returned low either as soon as it the process is done or, if a long process, the boost clock lowers and voltage along with it.
 
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