Question wifi router that can handle alot of devices

velocci

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Hi all, I'm looking for a wifi router that can handle a lot of wireless and wired devices. I have about 10 wired devices and 12 wireless devices. I also want a lot of speed. Can someone recommend a good router for $300 or less Canadian? Also, if a wifi router has 4 network ports, does that mean it can only handle 4 wired devices without getting too much load? Would it put too much load if I have a switch plugged into it and have 10 wired devices plugged into the switch?
 
On wireless it all depends how much bandwidth all the users are using. It is easy for a router to support lots of mostly idle users compared to a couple doing large downloads.

On wired you will likely run out of internet bandwidth before the router causes any bottleneck. You can hook switches up the only bottleneck is the 1gbit port back to the router but it is not likely you have a internet connection more than 1gbit so it is not a limitation.

It may not matter what you do if you do not have a large internet connection. Nothing will go faster than the internet.

On the wifi you could look at the tri-band routers so you could split your users over the 3 radios. It is not automatic your users would have to connect to the proper radio so you get some balance across the 3.

Routers in general have no issue handling the number of users you list. What tends to cause issues is if you are using thing like VPN or parental controls or other data filters. These put a lot of load on the CPU.
 

kanewolf

Titan
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A new router may not improve things if you have insufficient WAN bandwidth. Your 22 devices all trying to stream video will require a significant ISP package and a decent router.
I have about 40 devices on my network but many of them are cameras and other devices that don't use WAN bandwidth.
 

kanewolf

Titan
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thanks. so this list is ranked from last to first? the scores under the ranking # are increasing.
Yes. The "Router Ranker" is a tool that allows you to see a fair comparison of many routers. It also lets you read the review. Each router has strengths and weaknesses. You can read the in-depth review to see where each router is excellent and where there are issues.
The lower the number the better.

You can choose different criteria from the pulldowns. For example the R7800 is #1 based on total router criteria. But if you choose TCP throughput, the R8000 is now #1.
 

velocci

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Yes. The "Router Ranker" is a tool that allows you to see a fair comparison of many routers. It also lets you read the review. Each router has strengths and weaknesses. You can read the in-depth review to see where each router is excellent and where there are issues.
The lower the number the better.

You can choose different criteria from the pulldowns. For example the R7800 is #1 based on total router criteria. But if you choose TCP throughput, the R8000 is now #1.
is there an area that explains what TCP throughput, HTTP score and bufferbloat is?
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
I don't know what internet package I have from my ISP, but I just did a speedtest.net and it was 184Mbps down and 16Mbps up.
Probably 200/20 package.

20 to 30 devices isn't that many these days. The bigger question, is of the 12 WIFI devices, how many HAVE to be 2.4Ghz? That is the limiting factor in most home networks. Since you have wired infrastructure, get multiple WIFI sources and spread out the load.
 

kanewolf

Titan
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why does it matter how many of the wifi devices are on 2.4Ghz? that band can't handle a lot of devices?
2.4Ghz has very few unique radio channels, limited bandwidth, and has lots of interference from neighbors and other devices. 5Ghz has more available bandwidth but does not penetrate walls and other obstructions as well as 2.4Ghz WIFI. More physical WIFI sources is how you get "around" the limitations of 5Ghz and get more WIFI devices connected to it.
 

velocci

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so I keep the wifi router in my basement and get another access point and plug it into one of my network ports on another floor to increase signal strength?
 

velocci

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interesting. So....
  1. Is this to improve my signal strength or improve speeds?
  2. will the access point be its own wifi source or does it just connect the device to the main wifi router in the basement?
 
Last edited:

kanewolf

Titan
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interesting. So....
  1. Is this to improve my signal strength or improve speeds?
  2. will the access point be its own wifi source or does it just connect the device to the main wifi router in the basement?
It would provide an independent WIFI source which would use the wired infrastructure to connect back to your primary router for internet access for the devices connected to it.

It should improve signal -- which can improve performance. Especially for 5Ghz. connected devices.
 

velocci

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but access points are usually slower than the main wifi router and certainly not as fast as the wired connection. so the wifi device connected to the access point and then going to the main router through the wire will have its speed reduced to the lowest in the chain which is the access point. so I wouldn't gain more speed just cause the access point is plugged into my main router using a wire.
 

kanewolf

Titan
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but access points are usually slower than the main wifi router and certainly not as fast as the wired connection. so the wifi device connected to the access point and then going to the main router through the wire will have its speed reduced to the lowest in the chain which is the access point. so I wouldn't gain more speed just cause the access point is plugged into my main router using a wire.
The slowest link in the chain is often the client device. Access points are no worse than the WIFI from the primary router and usually better in a multi-story structure because the antennas are designed to radiate horizontally and not vertically.
You have your mind made up, so I will just say good luck.
 
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