wifi speed slow compared to what received

dandypeople

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Jan 8, 2018
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Hi, I have recently just upgraded my internet to 100mbs from 70 mbs. There is zero difference to my download speed on wifi, remaining at 40 - 49mbs. We have the virgin media super hub and a belkin n600 router. If I Ethernet to the router I get 92mbs. What is causing the loss of speed on wifi and why did it not increase at all despite having another 30mb coming in? I am not hugely tech savvy so plain English please. Is there a setting that is limiting the output? Any help appreciated.
 

Mark RM

Admirable
Jul 16, 2014
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OK now that you've clarified what's connecting.

The most likely explanation is that you are not connecting at the 5 Ghz frequency and that the connections at 2.4Ghz are in contention with overlapping signals from neighbors devices. It's also possible the router is set to only broadcast at 2.4Ghz and so on.

The issue here is on one hand you want plain English, but on the other you're ready blame what is really a decent enough router without digging into the issues.

My first choice would be to use the 5Ghz frequency as much as possible, so make sure your router is configured for that. If distance and walls are blocking the 5Ghz signal (common enough) and you are forced back to 2.4Ghz, then you need to configure that to get as clean a signal as possible.

https://www.howtogeek.com/197268/how-to-find-the-best-wi-fi-channel-for-your-router-on-any-operating-system/

Also we need some screen shots from your router - the wireless configuration pages.
 

dandypeople

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Jan 8, 2018
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I have a brand new laptop with wireless ac adapter so do not think the laptop is the problem. My old laptop received the same and my son's computer upstairs gets even less at about 20-30mbs using a tplink dongle. We accept there will be some loss due to walls etc upstairs but surely not to this extent. The problem seems to be the belkin router but why.
 

Mark RM

Admirable
Jul 16, 2014
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OK now that you've clarified what's connecting.

The most likely explanation is that you are not connecting at the 5 Ghz frequency and that the connections at 2.4Ghz are in contention with overlapping signals from neighbors devices. It's also possible the router is set to only broadcast at 2.4Ghz and so on.

The issue here is on one hand you want plain English, but on the other you're ready blame what is really a decent enough router without digging into the issues.

My first choice would be to use the 5Ghz frequency as much as possible, so make sure your router is configured for that. If distance and walls are blocking the 5Ghz signal (common enough) and you are forced back to 2.4Ghz, then you need to configure that to get as clean a signal as possible.

https://www.howtogeek.com/197268/how-to-find-the-best-wi-fi-channel-for-your-router-on-any-operating-system/

Also we need some screen shots from your router - the wireless configuration pages.
 

dandypeople

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Jan 8, 2018
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Hi, Thanks for that. This is where my lack of skill catches me out. When you mentioned the 5GHZ frequency it reminded me I had seen an option to connect to the router on the new laptop with .5ghz after it, so I did. This now gives that laptop 90 mbps. So you are right and I am wrong, it is the computers at fault not the router. So my next question is my old laptop did not have that option only the standard Belkin connection. How do I connect to the 5GHZ channel when it doesn't show in the list of available connections? With further internet searching I think I have established that my old laptop and my partners laptop will not support 5Ghz connection and probably not my son's dongle either. I gather I can buy a usb dongle to get round this going for a 802.11ac model, is that correct? Most people use the 2.4ghz connection so am wondering if there are any drawbacks to using 5GHZ bearing in mind my son is a keen gamer.
 

Mark RM

Admirable
Jul 16, 2014
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You are correct that you change all the units to work with AC 5Ghz connections, in some cases by changing the wifi card in laptops (cheap and easy) or by adding USB dongles that support this.

There's no downside when it works (signal is good enough to work I mean) it's the later standard for a reason and there's less contention and congestion for that frequency because it does not penetrate as far (for example, won't penetrate your neighbors home).

My kids all game on 5Ghz AC connections with very reasonable latency. The best gaming connections are wired ones, but really for most casual gamers wireless is fine.
 

dandypeople

Prominent
Jan 8, 2018
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Thank you, we have ordered a dongle and will try it for my sons computer. If no good should we consider powerline adapters to boost the signal to his room and do they work on extension leads as most sockets in this house are single sockets so would need the socket for the modem and the extension lead for the powerline adapter. My son is not so bothered with speed per se more with stability was just hoping to boost him somehow.
 

Mark RM

Admirable
Jul 16, 2014
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I totally understand, I've gone through the same, I installed professional grade Ubiquity access points and decent but not expensive wireless adapters in the kids computers, haven't had any complaints since.
 

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