[SOLVED] Will 4 sticks of 8gb ram be okay on the new motherboard

poorbugger

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Nov 28, 2015
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My dad is planning to get a ryzen 5 5600x. He already has an asus tuf b550 gaming plus motherboard. Previously he had a msi b450 tomahawk max with a ryzen 5 3600 and 4 sticks of 8gb 3200mhz ram ran without issues on that system. Will the new system be okay if the same rams are used?
 
My dad is planning to get a ryzen 5 5600x. He already has an asus tuf b550 gaming plus motherboard. Previously he had a msi b450 tomahawk max with a ryzen 5 3600 and 4 sticks of 8gb 3200mhz ram ran without issues on that system. Will the new system be okay if the same rams are used?
That combo can run can go to 4000MHz+ so 3200 is a cinch even if all 4 sticks of RAM are used. Zen3 on 500 series MB even gets better results like that.
 
My dad is planning to get a ryzen 5 5600x. He already has an asus tuf b550 gaming plus motherboard. Previously he had a msi b450 tomahawk max with a ryzen 5 3600 and 4 sticks of 8gb 3200mhz ram ran without issues on that system. Will the new system be okay if the same rams are used?
That combo can run can go to 4000MHz+ so 3200 is a cinch even if all 4 sticks of RAM are used. Zen3 on 500 series MB even gets better results like that.
 
Not entirely, it's enough to have same characteristics as ones on QVL. Those lists are too short and not regularly updated for new CPUs and BIOS versions. What worked at the beginning may not work later on an vice versa.
That is true for almost anything that has compatibility lists. But a 'good chance' it will work versus it definitely will work are two different things and only being on the qvl list separates those two. OP was asking if it would work--the only real answer is 'unknown/maybe'--unless there is an example of someone else out there that has done it successfully.
 
That is true for almost anything that has compatibility lists. But a 'good chance' it will work versus it definitely will work are two different things and only being on the qvl list separates those two. OP was asking if it would work--the only real answer is 'unknown/maybe'--unless there is an example of someone else out there that has done it successfully.
Sorry but even "definitely will work" may not be true because of changes in BIOS etc. I seriously doubt that they recheck all past ones again every time new BIOS is released. I have seen and had happen that changes in BIOS change situation and previously on QVL doesn't work as advertised any more,
Also many times a new BIOS described as "Improve DRAM/memory stability and compatibility" which could add whole slew of new RAM makes and models without them checking again.
 
Sorry but even "definitely will work" may not be true because of changes in BIOS etc. I seriously doubt that they recheck all past ones again every time new BIOS is released. I have seen and had happen that changes in BIOS change situation and previously on QVL doesn't work as advertised any more,
Also many times a new BIOS described as "Improve DRAM/memory stability and compatibility" which could add whole slew of new RAM makes and models without them checking again.
That's sad that bios changes invalidates previously working modules--what's the point of the qvl then? I get newer modules being supported but not tested, but older qvl ones stop working, that's ridiculous and sad to see. :(
 
That's sad that bios changes invalidates previously working modules--what's the point of the qvl then? I get newer modules being supported but not tested, but older qvl ones stop working, that's ridiculous and sad to see. :(
Things are moving fast, all prerequisites for memory compatibility are changing, CPU, BIOS and new RAM modules (makes and models, hundreds of them) would need to be checked and rechecked all the time. It would require large and expensive team to test and results wouldn't be seen for months.
On top of that RAM manufacturers keep on changing RAM control chips (every module has one) without notice, you could buy same RAM stick today and there are great chances it will have different controller and even chips than same one bought a while ago. One of main reasons one should stick with a RAM kit instead of upgrading even with same model.
On the other side, there are relatively small number of chip manufacturers and RAM stick producers just chuck them in and large number is just doing "Sticker engineering" by buying unmarked sticks and brand them as own.
Those are reasons I consider QVL only as a guide not a gospel.
 
Things are moving fast, all prerequisites for memory compatibility are changing, CPU, BIOS and new RAM modules (makes and models, hundreds of them) would need to be checked and rechecked all the time. It would require large and expensive team to test and results wouldn't be seen for months.
On top of that RAM manufacturers keep on changing RAM control chips (every module has one) without notice, you could buy same RAM stick today and there are great chances it will have different controller and even chips than same one bought a while ago. One of main reasons one should stick with a RAM kit instead of upgrading even with same model.
On the other side, there are relatively small number of chip manufacturers and RAM stick producers just chuck them in and large number is just doing "Sticker engineering" by buying unmarked sticks and brand them as own.
Those are reasons I consider QVL only as a guide not a gospel.
Wow--I didn't think it was this bad. I know consumer stuff lacks some integrity compared to enterprise stuff (where 'it works' means 'it works, period'), but I had no idea it was this bad on ram. Sad really because this stuff isn't cheap!
 

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