[SOLVED] Will a GTX 1660 bottleneck the Ryzen 2200g?

Mar 20, 2019
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Hi all I'm new to PC Building and planning to build my first PC soon :sneaky:. Will pairing the new GTX 1660 bottleneck the Ryzen 2200g? as I'm planning to buy the 2200g first before the graphics card and game on it while saving up before eventually buying the GTX 1660. How would it affect the performance of the graphics card? How much more of a performance (fps) gain will I receive if I held back and saved up for a Ryzen 2600 instead of the 2200G? I aim to play games at 1440p at 50-60 fps and 4k at 30 fps
 

RobCrezz

Titan
Herald
Can you go for a 2400g instead? That way you shouldnt have much of a bottleneck as you will have 8 threads.

A 2600 would be much better but obviously doesnt have a GPU.

Btw, on ryzen (especially when using integrated graphics), go for at least 3000mhz ram, faster the better.
 
Mar 20, 2019
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Can you go for a 2400g instead? That way you shouldnt have much of a bottleneck as you will have 8 threads.

A 2600 would be much better but obviously doesnt have a GPU.

Btw, on ryzen (especially when using integrated graphics), go for at least 3000mhz ram, faster the better.
At that price bracket it makes no sense for me to go for the 2400g as the 2600 seems like a much better choice for a slightly higher price. How much of an fps loss would I get if I opt in for a 2200g instead of the ryzen 2600 (both cpu on the GTX1660)?? Yes, I plan on buying the 3200mhz 16GB kit.
 

justin.m.beauvais

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Dec 15, 2017
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The bottleneck question depends heavily on your application. What games are you looking to play? In some the CPU will be the deciding factor in performance, in others the GPU. You can also force the bottleneck onto the GPU by increasing your graphics settings.

In general the 1660 should pair well with the 2200G as the GTX 1060 6GB paired well. The 1660 isn't that much faster than the 1060 so you should be able to extract most of the performance from the 1660 without a problem.

As for FPS drop... that is also super dependent on the games being played. So there really isn't a definitive answer that can be given.
 
Reactions: Rogue Leader
Mar 20, 2019
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The bottleneck question depends heavily on your application. What games are you looking to play? In some the CPU will be the deciding factor in performance, in others the GPU. You can also force the bottleneck onto the GPU by increasing your graphics settings.

In general the 1660 should pair well with the 2200G as the GTX 1060 6GB paired well. The 1660 isn't that much faster than the 1060 so you should be able to extract most of the performance from the 1660 without a problem.

As for FPS drop... that is also super dependent on the games being played. So there really isn't a definitive answer that can be given.
That sounds like a relief! I plan on building a PC just to play video games I don't need other uses such as video editing, streaming and etc.. Sounds Like I will be going with this route! do you think I could run with this CPU for two years before upgrading it??
 

justin.m.beauvais

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Dec 15, 2017
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That sounds like a relief! I plan on building a PC just to play video games I don't need other uses such as video editing, streaming and etc.. Sounds Like I will be going with this route! do you think I could run with this CPU for two years before upgrading it??
You should be able to. It isn't like processor speeds are advancing all that quickly anymore. Even if they suddenly start you'll be on the AM4 platform which makes CPU upgrades just a question of what Ryzen CPU you want to put on the board, with a possible BIOS update. We already know that the 3rd generation Ryzen CPUs being released later this year will be supported so future upgrades could be as easy as a BIOS update and dropping a Ryzen 5 3600X in the socket in a year or two. With the 1660 you'll have a good midrange card for a couple years and a good lower end card for a couple years after that.
 
The bottleneck question depends heavily on your application. What games are you looking to play? In some the CPU will be the deciding factor in performance, in others the GPU. You can also force the bottleneck onto the GPU by increasing your graphics settings.
This. Also, a BIG factor is your monitor's resolution and refresh rate.

Bottleneck is a very badly misused term.
 
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Mar 20, 2019
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What about getting a 2600 now and a cheaper GPU (which you can sell later when you upgrade), like a GT 1030?
The main reason I chose to build a PC was to achieve better gaming experience to my PS4 (although I have no problems with it). I want to venture to 1440p 30+ fps gaming BADLY, while not costing a fortune. I have previously thought of going with the RX570, but from the reviews and benchmarks I've gathered, that card is not really made for 1440p whereas the 1660 is.
 

justin.m.beauvais

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Dec 15, 2017
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would there be any kind of CPU priced in between the 2200g and the 2600 that you would recommend?
Well, there is the Ryzen 5 1600. The 2600 basically just has a clock speed advantage and an overclocking advantage. It is still 6 cores and 12 threads. The only other option would be the 2400G. Right now Newegg has both CPUs on sale for $140 and $135 respectively. So... if you got a 2400G and an RX 580 you would come in at around the same price as the 2200G and 1660 combo.

Soooooo, some post-it note math tells me that the optimum price right now for the 2200G and 1660 is $315. Meaning for the exact same budget getting the 1600 leaves you with $170 to spend on a GPU... which is RX 580 territory, but the 580 still comes in at $20 more than budget. The difference between the 1660 and the RX 580 is only about 16%, and the performance gains from the 2200G to the 1600 is measured as 6% by UserBenchmark... however, you gain 2 cores and 6 threads of CPU resources... which is HUGE. So you'll have more CPU performance and only slightly less graphics performance for $20.

Now, you've mentioned that you want to play at 1440p? The GTX 1660 is not a great 1440p card. It is capable of playing at 1440p, then again so are the RX 580 and the RX 570... and you'll have a good time with any of them if you run at medium settings instead of high. These cards are meant for high end 1080p gaming. So they will deliver decent 1440p results at reduced graphics settings. For a card that is capable of 1440p gaming at high settings you need to be looking at more powerful cards like the 1660Ti, GTX 1070, RTX 2060, or Vega 56. Any of those would be outstanding for 1440p at high settings and 60+ fps. The RX 570, 580, GTX 1660, and GTX 1060 are all at best medium settings 1440p at 30-60 FPS cards.

So, for my final CPU suggestion, and this is going to be coming from way off in left field because I haven't even mentioned it yet, it is the Ryzen 7 1700 with 8 cores/16 threads, which is sitting around $160 on Newegg right now. Add to that an RX 570 and you come in at $300 for CPU and GPU. In a year or two you can upgrade to just about anything you want for a video card and the CPU will still be a good performer.
 
The R5-1600 has been spotted on sale for some $80-$99, and is the standard 'go to' for budget R5 gaming rigs; the 2600 will undoubtedly take it's place when prices drop some more...

Certainly no reason to pay any extra for a "G" variant/addition of integrated graphics if planning on using a discrete GPU anyway...
 
Mar 20, 2019
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Well, there is the Ryzen 5 1600. The 2600 basically just has a clock speed advantage and an overclocking advantage. It is still 6 cores and 12 threads. The only other option would be the 2400G. Right now Newegg has both CPUs on sale for $140 and $135 respectively. So... if you got a 2400G and an RX 580 you would come in at around the same price as the 2200G and 1660 combo.

Soooooo, some post-it note math tells me that the optimum price right now for the 2200G and 1660 is $315. Meaning for the exact same budget getting the 1600 leaves you with $170 to spend on a GPU... which is RX 580 territory, but the 580 still comes in at $20 more than budget. The difference between the 1660 and the RX 580 is only about 16%, and the performance gains from the 2200G to the 1600 is measured as 6% by UserBenchmark... however, you gain 2 cores and 6 threads of CPU resources... which is HUGE. So you'll have more CPU performance and only slightly less graphics performance for $20.

Now, you've mentioned that you want to play at 1440p? The GTX 1660 is not a great 1440p card. It is capable of playing at 1440p, then again so are the RX 580 and the RX 570... and you'll have a good time with any of them if you run at medium settings instead of high. These cards are meant for high end 1080p gaming. So they will deliver decent 1440p results at reduced graphics settings. For a card that is capable of 1440p gaming at high settings you need to be looking at more powerful cards like the 1660Ti, GTX 1070, RTX 2060, or Vega 56. Any of those would be outstanding for 1440p at high settings and 60+ fps. The RX 570, 580, GTX 1660, and GTX 1060 are all at best medium settings 1440p at 30-60 FPS cards.

So, for my final CPU suggestion, and this is going to be coming from way off in left field because I haven't even mentioned it yet, it is the Ryzen 7 1700 with 8 cores/16 threads, which is sitting around $160 on Newegg right now. Add to that an RX 570 and you come in at $300 for CPU and GPU. In a year or two you can upgrade to just about anything you want for a video card and the CPU will still be a good performer.
Sorry for the late reply WOW was not expecting such an in depth answer!! I have been so persistent on going with the 1660, I will definitely look into a more balanced build, might go for a better CPU and downgrade the GPU to a RX580, Thanks for the input!
 

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