Question Will Cat 8 be a hindrance by the wall socket ?

ferris847

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Hi, currently I'm using the schneider avatorOn series of ethernet socket on the wall.



which comes with one of these:


which the product claims to be a cat 6 grade connector?

I can find one that says cat 5/5e too, but not anything higher than 6.

I wonder if this single connector will hinder all the cat 8 cables pointless if I go through the wall with the above connector?

If so, would cat 6a be the same?

Thank you all in advance.
 

Ralston18

Titan
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That is a punchdown Keystone wall jack.

However, that may not be the issue....

Did you purchase and install Cat 8 cables? If so where did you purchase the cables?

Likely to be fake and/or very low performance.

All you need is Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable from a known manufacturer. (Lots of counterfeit products out there as well. Be careful.)

Pure copper (not CCA - copper clad aluminum), AWG 22-24, UTP round cable - not flat.

Forget/ignore other supposedly higher standards.

FYI:

https://www.telco-data.com/cat5e-vs-cat6-vs-cat7-vs-cat8/

You can easily find other similar links regarding Ethernet cables and standards.

Also installation matters - so if you are DIY then do some additional research and reading about installing Ethernet cabling.

Be aware that in some areas you may need to get permits and approvals beforehand. And inspections.
 
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Are you running all new wire in the walls?

Cat8 if they have actually released it is designed for 40gbit. It is not really wire you run inside your walls because of distance limitations. This is a confusing standard there are actually multiple forms of cat8 and some do not even use rj45 connectors. It is not something a home user would need.

So if money it not the primary issue run cat6a in the walls. This is designed to run 10gbit. The even better option is to run flexible conduit so you can replace wire in the future if you ever need it.

In most cases cat5e cable will be fine. There are very few applications that can actually use more than 1gbit and machines are many times limited by say the file system or the hard drives. Of course getting even 1gbit internet is not even possible for all people.

So either run cat5e or run cat6a. I would use cat5e keystones for now even if you run cat6a wire. They keystone are easily replaced and by the time you actually can use a 10g port the keystone price likely will have dropped.

As stated above they key thing to watch for is fake cables. The main cost of ethernet cable is the copper metal and the fake cables are using tricky ways to get a lower price by using less metal. In many cases you can get the wire at your local home improvement store for about the same price because shipping is expensive. With a local store it is less likley they sell you crap since you can go yell at them in person.
 

ferris847

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Thank you for the response, I'm curious why cat 5e and 6a but not 6? Is there particular reason?

Right now after all the research, I'm leaning towards cat 6, since the "keystone" above is graded cat 6, setting it up will give me less hassle, however is there a downside to 6?
 

ferris847

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Appreciate your time to reply.

Idk about the cable being fake or not, reviews say that it can perform as advertise.

But either way, super helpful from your answer and it helps me to decide to go with just cat 6.
 

kanewolf

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Thank you for the response, I'm curious why cat 5e and 6a but not 6? Is there particular reason?

Right now after all the research, I'm leaning towards cat 6, since the "keystone" above is graded cat 6, setting it up will give me less hassle, however is there a downside to 6?
cat5e and cat6a are the two most used standards. Cat6a is an improvement to cat6. But, unless you believe you will have a full 10GE copper network, cat5e will work fine. For home network 5e and 6a are the best standards to follow. Since you are doing your own install, remember that cat5e and cat6a standards require not just rated components but also rated workmanship. You can't untwist 3 inches of cable to connect to a keystone jack and call that "cat6a".
And don't think that shielded cable is "better". It isn't better for home use. But it IS much more difficult to work with CORRECTLY.
When looking at cat5e or cat6a standards remember that wire gauge is part of the standard. 30AWG flat patch cables don't meet standard. 22 to 24 AWG 100% copper cable only.
 
Thank you for the response, I'm curious why cat 5e and 6a but not 6? Is there particular reason?

Right now after all the research, I'm leaning towards cat 6, since the "keystone" above is graded cat 6, setting it up will give me less hassle, however is there a downside to 6?
The key reason is cat6a is certified to 10gbit and cat6 is not....well it works at shorter distances but the exact distance is not actually specified. There really is no way to guaranty a cat6 run will pass 10gbit of traffic unless you take a expensive meter and actually run a certification test on it. With cat6a as long as your cable is under 100 meters it will run traffic at 10gbit.

The longer answer is based on the history of cat5e and cat6 when they were going from 100m to 1gbit. Cat6 cable can run gigabit speed over just 2 pair or wires. So in theory it will save you money by running less wires. Cat5e needs all 4 pairs. The manufactures of the ethernet chips decided to support the CAT5e standard. I only saw 1 router from cisco that could run gigabit over 2 pair. So at this point cat6 was a dead product but the cable manufacture had invested a lot into it so the marketing guys started their standard deceptive advertising. Until very recently cat6 had no advantage at all over cat5e. When 10g ports came out and cat6a was still really expensive people found out cat6 cable would work in some cases. Now to make this even more confusing 2.5g and 5g can also run on cat6 cable but again the distance is not a fixed value.

There is not a huge cost difference anymore between cat6 and cat6a. Because it is a little more complex to manufacture cat6a cable cost more than cat6. What has happened is the cost of the copper metal has gotten so high that you do not notice this cost difference as much.

If you really are going to run 10g it is not worth the hassle that sometime cat6 cable might not work. The only time you really would use cat6 cable is you happen to get it cheaper than cat5e.

Be extremely careful though when you look at price. If a cable is a lot cheaper it is very likely it is a fake.
 

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