Question Will i pcie 3.0 hinder 3080Ti performance noticeably?

FoxInFlames

Upstanding
Jan 3, 2022
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So, currently I've mounted the GPU on the 4.0 x 16 slot but i am considering getting a GPU riser cable (for some aesthetic and some not-so-aesthetic reasons), one i could go for soon is a 3.0 x 16 one (from thermaltake, this), otherwise I'd have to give it a bit more time to get a 4.0 x 16 riser from cooler master (this one), so will i get any issues from using a 3.0? (I usually only play games and try a bit of blender, completely new in that area)

Also, would i need to change stuff in bios? Not like i don't want to, but if it's necessary.
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
I'd opt to get a PCIe 4.0 riser and do away with any troubleshooting that might be necessary. People who dropped in a PCIe 4.0 card onto a PCIe 3.0 riser needed to use a #.0 GPU to enable PCIe 3.0 in motherboard BIOS and then drop the PCIe 4.0 into the riser.
 
So, currently I've mounted the GPU on the 4.0 x 16 slot but i am considering getting a GPU riser cable
so will i get any issues from using a 3.0?
Also, would i need to change stuff in bios? Not like i don't want to, but if it's necessary.
What motherboard? What cpu?

PCIE 4.0 card in PCIE 4.0 slot with PCIE 3.0 raiser cable simply will not work.
Downshift from PCIE 4.0 mode to 3.0 does not happen automatically in this situation. It needs to be set in BIOS.
 
On another note, you don't necessarily need a PCIe 4.0 riser cable to connect a PCIe 4.0 device to a PCIe 4.0 slot. If the cable was well/over built, it doesn't really matter if the cable is a PCIe 3.0 or a 2.0 cable. And as far as I know, there hasn't been a physical change to the pinout of PCIe.

So best case scenario, you can use PCIe 4.0 with your PCIe 3.0 riser cable.

Worst case scenario, you have to adjust the PCIe version in the computer. And even then, it's unlikely dropping to PCIe 3.0 will actually incur any practical performance hit.
 
On another note, you don't necessarily need a PCIe 4.0 riser cable to connect a PCIe 4.0 device to a PCIe 4.0 slot.
If the cable was well/over built, it doesn't really matter if the cable is a PCIe 3.0 or a 2.0 cable. And as far as I know, there hasn't been a physical change to the pinout of PCIe.
You get degraded signal quality with PCIE 3.0 riser cable connecting PCIE 4.0 hardware.
So - to use PCIE 3.0 raiser cable, it has to be PCIE 4.0 certified. Essentially it's PCIE 4.0 cable then.
 
You get degraded signal quality with PCIE 3.0 riser cable connecting PCIE 4.0 hardware.
So - to use PCIE 3.0 raiser cable, it has to be PCIE 4.0 certified. Essentially it's PCIE 4.0 cable then.
Again, if the cable is well/overbuilt, it may be able to handle a faster signal. All the version means it's been tested to work with that version, not having it doesn't mean it absolutely won't.

It's like saying a Cat 5e cable made before 2015 can't be used with 2.5G Ethernet (which was standardized in 2015) because the cable wasn't tested for 2.5G, even though the 5e standard hasn't changed since its ratification (and it shouldn't, because it wouldn't be 5e now would it?)
 
Again, if the cable is well/overbuilt, it may be able to handle a faster signal. All the version means it's been tested to work with that version, not having it doesn't mean it absolutely won't.
Do you personally know any of such PCIE 3.0 raiser cables, capable of running PCIE 4.0 cards in PCIE 4.0 mode?
PCIE 4.0 raiser cables require additional shielding for signal integrity.

I'm not saying, it would be impossible for some over-engineered PCIE 3.0 raiser cables to exist.
But then it would be sold as PCIE 4.0 raiser cable. Wouldn't it?
 
But then it would be sold as PCIE 4.0 raiser cable. Wouldn't it?
Assuming the vendor is doing all the right things, they can't sell a PCIe 4.0 cable as one unless they test/certify for it. And testing/certification takes time/money, so why bother? Also there may be plenty of PCIe 3.0 cables out there floating around in inventory for God knows how long and you can't simply pull those out of inventory to test them just so you can slap on a PCIE 4.0 label.
 

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