Question Will MoCA work in this house? Pics inside.

Dec 2, 2020
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I live in a really old (~100 year old) century house with thick-ass plaster walls. As a result my WiFi is spotty so I'm exploring MoCA as a solution.

Problem is that this house obviously doesn't have CAT/ethernet cable routed behind the walls. And since it' plaster and everything from the basement to the attic are finished routing CAT5 cable will be a total pain. But it does have coaxial routed from its origin point in the basement, and into every part of the house. Every room has a single coaxial wall plate.

I've read up on MoCA but being brand new to it I'm still not 100% sure if my current house setup will work with it. So here's what my house looks like:



A few questions:
  1. My DSL line and Coaxial cable entry points are not in the same room. Is this a problem for a MoCA setup?
  2. Does it matter which "end" of the coaxial cable the MoCA adapter is plugged into? Or can I use literally any male coaxial connection in any part of the house to plug into an adapter?
  3. I really like the Motorola MM1000. Is this a good pick considering my house's configuration?
  4. Do I need one adapter for each room that I want to have a wired Internet connection in?
 
The only concern would be the quality of the splitters. Since you do not have cable tv on them they could be very old. If they are somewhat new and can pass the frequiences used by cable tv then moca will likely work well also.

In a simple setup like yours where you not using the coax for anything else you pretty much just put a moca box in each room and connect the equipment to it. It really doesn't matter to much what is connected where. The moca network acts as kinda a network switch and all devices appear connected directly to each other.

The motorola devices will work fine. Many people like the gocoax devices, they are a little cheaper and actually faster not that it really matters when your internet usage will be limited by the DSL line speed.
 
Dec 2, 2020
2
0
10
0
The only concern would be the quality of the splitters. Since you do not have cable tv on them they could be very old. If they are somewhat new and can pass the frequiences used by cable tv then moca will likely work well also.

In a simple setup like yours where you not using the coax for anything else you pretty much just put a moca box in each room and connect the equipment to it. It really doesn't matter to much what is connected where. The moca network acts as kinda a network switch and all devices appear connected directly to each other.

The motorola devices will work fine. Many people like the gocoax devices, they are a little cheaper and actually faster not that it really matters when your internet usage will be limited by the DSL line speed.
Thanks for the heads up about the splitters. Should I get cable splitters with similar signal ratings (5mhz to 1 ghz), or should I get the higher rated splitters for satellite (2-2150 MHz)? Or even these ones? Pictures of the current splitters: Attic splitter, Basement Splitter 1, Basement Splitter 2

By the way I've heard about MoCA POE filters while researching MoCA but I'm not totally clear on when they're necessary. Do I need one?
 
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