Pijmzhchus

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I´ve read that B450 and X470 boards will get Zen 3 support. I just wanna know if my board will support it. It´s MSI Gaming Pro Carbon B350. Right now I have R5 1600 (not AF) and it´s fine, but in the future I will upgrade it for sure. Since it seems I can´t upgrade to Zen 3 (please tell me of I´m wrong) I will upgrade to 3900X or 3950X. Can you also tell me if this motherboard can run 3950X? The motherboard has some really good VRMs for B350 board I read. It´s listed here: https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/support/B350-GAMING-PRO-CARBON#support-cpu but I´m not sure. Will 3900X or 3950X be able to keep up with next gen games? Games like AC:Odyssey already are very CPU hungry. Thanks to anyone who writes something ;)
 

Pijmzhchus

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No, it won't support zen 3 (ryzen 4th gen)
it does and will support the 3950X

and yes, a high end zen 2 cpu will be good for quite a while unless amd or intel pull something out of a rabbit hat.
Ok. Atleast Zen 2 works. Now I will wait for the Ryzen 3900X or 3950X to go down in price. Ryzen rocks!
 
I bet in 2 or smthn years intel will do a 2005 and leave amd in the dust.
I seriously doubt that will happen this time. Mainly because AMD's being managed much better and rolling cash back into ER&D and has a product lineup (this time) that's making significant inroads in very important high-margin segments. That's HEDT and data farms where their products just utterly dominate. In these segments, once you're in they're loath to quickly change for change itself.

So Intel will have to return with a product that itself utterly dominates to take share back and that seems increasingly unlikely. They'll probably have something good but only enough so to get back into competitiveness and slow, or stop, further share erosion. Which means, hopefully, it will be close-to-50/50 share and good for everyone.

But also the consumer PC market is way different now. Today, the overseas market is increasingly the more important and they aren't nearly so 'brand sensitive'. Just look at the EU where AMD's getting 90% of sales in at least one important market space. They'll go with value and Intel has a reputation of being over-priced (if not price gouging) premium brand, tolerated much more than adored and even then by a declining enthusiast segment. I'm not sure they want to tackle the value market space even now.

And then there's the nascent Chinese industry. Not much more than a joke so far, but will it remain that way?
 
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Ok. Atleast Zen 2 works. Now I will wait for the Ryzen 3900X or 3950X to go down in price. Ryzen rocks!
For gaming alone those would be overkill. Also, while the board would support it B350 boards were notorious for weak VRM's which is something a 12 core, and especially 16 core, CPU will need to have strong and stable. It's seriously not recommended to run one on it, but then all those cores don't help with gaming anyway.

You're in luck though: even a 3300X provides impressive gaming with high-end GPU's. I'd suggest going no further than a 3700X if you're also into high-resolution streaming your gaming action. But a 3600 is the best-value 'sweet spot' and is extremely unlikely to put an excessive burden on even a weak (for B350) VRM.
 
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siaan312

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I seriously doubt that will happen this time. Mainly because AMD's being managed much better and rolling cash back into ER&D and has a product lineup (this time) that's making significant inroads in very important high-margin segments. That's HEDT and data farms where their products just utterly dominate. In these segments, once you're in they're loath to quickly change for change itself.

So Intel will have to return with a product that itself utterly dominates to take share back and that seems increasingly unlikely. They'll probably have something good but only enough so to get back into competitiveness and slow, or stop, further share erosion. Which means, hopefully, it will be close-to-50/50 share and good for everyone.

But also the consumer PC market is way different now. Today, the overseas market is increasingly the more important and they aren't nearly so 'brand sensitive'. Just look at the EU where AMD's getting 90% of sales in at least one important market space. They'll go with value and Intel has a reputation of being over-priced (if not price gouging) premium brand, tolerated much more than adored and even then by a declining enthusiast segment. I'm not sure they want to tackle the value market space even now.

And then there's the nascent Chinese industry. Not much more than a joke so far, but will it remain that way?
just like in the pentium days, when amd was in the lead intel did the exact same thing they are doing now

waiting on their good product to be amazing, and just upping power draw and performance on their current chip.
after that they released core 2 duo and quad, which dominated amd so hard they went bunkrupt for around 10 years.
 
just like in the pentium days, when amd was in the lead intel did the exact same thing they are doing now

waiting on their good product to be amazing, and just upping power draw and performance on their current chip.
after that they released core 2 duo and quad, which dominated amd so hard they went bunkrupt for around 10 years.
Cor 2 duo and quad (775) were outclassed by AMD FX processors, only Intel's name kept their popularity.
 

siaan312

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Cor 2 duo and quad (775) were outclassed by AMD FX processors, only Intel's name kept their popularity.
Wrong.
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cpu-charts-2007,1644-40.html
this is a tomshardware article from 2007 comparing them.

they declared intel the winner by a small margin
then after that intel released the core i3 i5 i7 which competed with amd's already bad reputation and knocked it further

then putting them in the ground with the amazing performance of sandy-bridge in 2011.
so then till ryzen came by in 2017, amd didnt have any high end offering, only mid-low range that would tackle the market between i3's and i5's which was a bit empty.
 
Wrong.
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cpu-charts-2007,1644-40.html
this is a tomshardware article from 2007 comparing them.

they declared intel the winner by a small margin
then after that intel released the core i3 i5 i7 which competed with amd's already bad reputation and knocked it further

then putting them in the ground with the amazing performance of sandy-bridge in 2011.
so then till ryzen came by in 2017, amd didnt have any high end offering, only mid-low range that would tackle the market between i3's and i5's which was a bit empty.
At that time there' were no FX processors, only Athlon and Phenom.
 

Schlachtwolf

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The problem with FX cpus (I had an FX 8300 Vishera 8 core 8 thread on 32nm silicon which was awesome at the time) was heat, they were really quite hot in the upper range cpu. Kind of ironic that Intel have now gone down the same route with the 10 series of egg frying capability.....
 

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