[SOLVED] Will my i7-7700t bottleneck any high graphics cards?

Jul 20, 2019
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Will my CPU bottleneck something like a 2080 ti/2080 super? If so whats the highest graphics card I can get for my CPU?
 

Third-Eye

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Jun 26, 2011
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In the case of the 2080Ti - and to some extent, the 2080 Super, it literally does come out as such... the gpu is still significantly outpacing the cpu, and one or more threads are pegged at 100%; it does not need to be all of the cores.
You make it sound as if temperature and single thread usage are the only things that can throttle cpus... they're not.
There's also memory(single channel), motherboards with insufficient power phases, and the gpu in extreme situations.
I suppose I should've been a little more careful with my choice of words... oh well... I guess it's also a matter of perspective.

2070/Super? No~
This is the 7700T, not the 7700(K).
-Lower clock speeds - boost clock on all 4 cores is just 3.6ghz
-Lower max operating temp - 80C - It's 100C on the other 2
-Designed for lower power consumption @ 35w - I would not expect this cpu to maintain it's turbo clocks for extended periods of time like it's faster siblings @ 65w and 91w - that's significant!
A cpu like this is designed for short 'bursts of turbo' during actual tasks, and then it slows back down. This is to keep power consumption low. Running turbo all the time increases power, defeating the purpose for which it was made!
-No overclocking - It's a low power part, of course not.
This is literally still not the GPU causing the CPU to throttle. The work load put on the CPU has nothing to do with the GPU causing the CPU to throttle since the GPU waits on the CPU for instructions. This is why people talk about a CPU bottle-necking a GPU, because the GPU workload is outpacing the CPUs workload. Intel didn't design their CPUs to use max Turbo boost all the time under load. Turbo boost will stay active as long as you can keep the CPU close to the TJM and TDP recommendation Intel has set for a CPU. If the CPU is thermally throttling, you need a better cooler.

So to that end, an RTX 2070/Super or RX5700/5700XT is about the fastest video card you would want to run on an i7-7700T since the GPU will likely still be outpacing the CPU in most games. If the OP were playing at 4k in everything, it would be far less of a bottle-neck with the GPU being put under more load than at 1080p.
 

Phaaze88

Admirable
Herald
2080TI is not a 1080p gpu, and will throttle all available cpus at that resolution.
2080 Super will throttle most cpus as well, save for the 9700k/9900k on gpu heavy games.

With the 7700T, I'd suggest a 1660Ti.
 

Third-Eye

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Jun 26, 2011
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2080TI is not a 1080p gpu, and will throttle all available cpus at that resolution.
2080 Super will throttle most cpus as well, save for the 9700k/9900k on gpu heavy games.

With the 7700T, I'd suggest a 1660Ti.
The video card doesn't throttle the CPU. Not even sure what you mean by that. What will happen is at lower resolutions the CPU will be pushed to the maximum to provide the highest fps. Running a 2080ti at 1080p would just mean leaving probably 50% of it's total available performance unused. You would be better off getting an RTX 2070/Super.
 

Phaaze88

Admirable
Herald
The video card doesn't throttle the CPU. Not even sure what you mean by that. What will happen is at lower resolutions the CPU will be pushed to the maximum to provide the highest fps. Running a 2080ti at 1080p would just mean leaving probably 50% of it's total available performance unused. You would be better off getting an RTX 2070/Super.
In the case of the 2080Ti - and to some extent, the 2080 Super, it literally does come out as such... the gpu is still significantly outpacing the cpu, and one or more threads are pegged at 100%; it does not need to be all of the cores.
You make it sound as if temperature and single thread usage are the only things that can throttle cpus... they're not.
There's also memory(single channel), motherboards with insufficient power phases, and the gpu in extreme situations.
I suppose I should've been a little more careful with my choice of words... oh well... I guess it's also a matter of perspective.

2070/Super? No~
This is the 7700T, not the 7700(K).
-Lower clock speeds - boost clock on all 4 cores is just 3.6ghz
-Lower max operating temp - 80C - It's 100C on the other 2
-Designed for lower power consumption @ 35w - I would not expect this cpu to maintain it's turbo clocks for extended periods of time like it's faster siblings @ 65w and 91w - that's significant!
A cpu like this is designed for short 'bursts of turbo' during actual tasks, and then it slows back down. This is to keep power consumption low. Running turbo all the time increases power, defeating the purpose for which it was made!
-No overclocking - It's a low power part, of course not.
 
If you have the money to blow on a 2080Ti, then you can step down to 'merely' the 2080 Super, saving ~$400 and fund both a new CPU and mainboard ...(Unless playing at least 1440P or at 144 Hz, even the 2080 Super might be more GPU than needed, given the performance levels of of the 5700XT and 2070 Super)
 

Third-Eye

Distinguished
Jun 26, 2011
280
37
18,720
3
In the case of the 2080Ti - and to some extent, the 2080 Super, it literally does come out as such... the gpu is still significantly outpacing the cpu, and one or more threads are pegged at 100%; it does not need to be all of the cores.
You make it sound as if temperature and single thread usage are the only things that can throttle cpus... they're not.
There's also memory(single channel), motherboards with insufficient power phases, and the gpu in extreme situations.
I suppose I should've been a little more careful with my choice of words... oh well... I guess it's also a matter of perspective.

2070/Super? No~
This is the 7700T, not the 7700(K).
-Lower clock speeds - boost clock on all 4 cores is just 3.6ghz
-Lower max operating temp - 80C - It's 100C on the other 2
-Designed for lower power consumption @ 35w - I would not expect this cpu to maintain it's turbo clocks for extended periods of time like it's faster siblings @ 65w and 91w - that's significant!
A cpu like this is designed for short 'bursts of turbo' during actual tasks, and then it slows back down. This is to keep power consumption low. Running turbo all the time increases power, defeating the purpose for which it was made!
-No overclocking - It's a low power part, of course not.
This is literally still not the GPU causing the CPU to throttle. The work load put on the CPU has nothing to do with the GPU causing the CPU to throttle since the GPU waits on the CPU for instructions. This is why people talk about a CPU bottle-necking a GPU, because the GPU workload is outpacing the CPUs workload. Intel didn't design their CPUs to use max Turbo boost all the time under load. Turbo boost will stay active as long as you can keep the CPU close to the TJM and TDP recommendation Intel has set for a CPU. If the CPU is thermally throttling, you need a better cooler.

So to that end, an RTX 2070/Super or RX5700/5700XT is about the fastest video card you would want to run on an i7-7700T since the GPU will likely still be outpacing the CPU in most games. If the OP were playing at 4k in everything, it would be far less of a bottle-neck with the GPU being put under more load than at 1080p.
 

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