Will my NAS transfer and local streaming speeds increase if I use a good router?

panpaper

Commendable
Dec 8, 2016
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So I only recently found out that I can connect my modem to a dedicated router instead of using the gateway. Will a dedicated router increase local transfer rates? I'm mostly looking at local NAS transfer rates and local steam streaming to a laptop from my gaming PC.

Edit: my modem is not a gigabit modem, it's the basic one provided by my ISP (Hitron CGNM-2250), and my ISP provides 150 mbps down and 20 mbps up. I'm planning to get a gigabit router. I don't know if my devices are gigabit compatible, but my PC is a 2016 dell XPS tower and a laptop is a 2018 Asus zenbook flip.

Thanks!
 
only if it is gigabit and the other is not. If everything is running gigabit then it won't make much of a difference. Even if the router was a 10/100 you would only need to plug it into a gigabit switch and then connect all your local devices to that to get the gigabit speed. Router doesn't need to be gigabit to get gigabit lan speeds
 
If u hooked things up correctly, what router does no matter.

Because you would be going: NAS --> Gigabit Ethernet Switch ---> PC. The data path doesn't even touch the router.

Now if you are going through WIFI, then it depends if the WIFI router is able to handle, and able to give you the full bandwidth whatever 802.11 ur running, susceptible to environmental variables.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator


If all the devices in the chain are gigabit capable, it does not matter.
 


Are you sure it is not a gigabit router? They wouldn't give you a non gigabit if your internet speed is faster than what your router can provide. It would be a 10/100 then on the router when you are getting 150x20 internet speed. It sounds like it is a gigabit router. Who is your ISP and what is the model of the gateway?
 

panpaper

Commendable
Dec 8, 2016
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I have a Hitron CGNM-2250 from Shaw in Canada. The product page on Hitron says up to 950 mbps. I'm talking about local transfers though, like transferring files and streaming content on the LAN.

Thanks!
 
It is more a generic term people use. If the router has gigabit lan ports people call that a gigabit router.

The key thing is if you could take the router apart what you would find is a 5 port switch with 4 ports connected to the lan ports and the 5th port connected internally to the router cpu.

Traffic in your LAN only goes to the switch chip it does not pass over the connection to the router cpu. Since the switch is asic based it will pass traffic with no delays. It can run every port at 1gbit up and 1gbit down all at the same time.

The only time the "router" really matters is when your traffic is going to the internet. Then it must pass between the switch and the router cpu chip. The CPU can not pass traffic as fast as ASIC
 

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