Question Will NZXT X62 Kraken be enough to cool i9-9900ks?

Sep 27, 2019
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Hey guys,

So i just upgraded to an i9-9900ks from an i7-7700 which i was cooling with an NZXT Kraken X62. Just wondering if you guys think it will be sufficient cooling? Im hearing online the normal i9-9900k runs really hot so i am concerned it wont be enough. Any help/suggestions will be appreciated
 
Nov 5, 2019
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Same question.
I’m buying a new PC with i9-9900KS and I can’t decide which cooling to take. I choose between Noctua NH-D15S + 120mm NF-A12x25 PWM, NZXT Kraken X62 and Corsair H115i pro. Due to possible problems with the AIO, look towards Noctua NH-D15S .. but, I'm afraid it will not cope with the cooling of the overclocked i9-9900KS.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
It will work, but it's not going to give you any breathing room at all. You are going to be toeing the line in terms of thermal compliance, even at the stock configuration. Overclocking will be out of the question. You would be a lot better off with a 360/420mm AIO or a 280mm or higher custom loop. One of the very big twin finstack air coolers would likely be sufficient as well.

For air cooling, this would be the optimal solution, for anybody desiring to go that way.


Or, in lieu of that, recommendations could include the NH-D15, D15 WITH Noctua iPPC industrial 2000rpm fans, Thermalright Silver arrow ibe extreme, Phanteks PH-TC14PE or Cryorig R1.

Otherwise, I'd recommend one of the larger AIO coolers AND plan to use a case with sufficient additional fan locations to allow for a good amount of case airflow to be implemented as CPU core temps won't be the only consideration. These CPUs are going to put the VRMs on most motherboards to the full test for sure.

I would probably not buy anything right now. Use what you have and determine for yourself whether or not the performance is sufficient for your demands. What works for you may not work for somebody else and visa versa.
 
Last edited:
Sep 27, 2019
13
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It will work, but it's not going to give you any breathing room at all. You are going to be toeing the line in terms of thermal compliance, even at the stock configuration. Overclocking will be out of the question. You would be a lot better off with a 360/420mm AIO or a 280mm or higher custom loop. One of the very big twin finstack air coolers would likely be sufficient as well.

For air cooling, this would be the optimal solution, for anybody desiring to go that way.


Or, in lieu of that, recommendations could include the NH-D15, D15 WITH Noctua iPPC industrial 2000rpm fans, Thermalright Silver arrow ibe extreme, Phanteks PH-TC14PE or Cryorig R1.

Otherwise, I'd recommend one of the larger AIO coolers AND plan to use a case with sufficient additional fan locations to allow for a good amount of case airflow to be implemented as CPU core temps won't be the only consideration. These CPUs are going to put the VRMs on most motherboards to the full test for sure.

I would probably not buy anything right now. Use what you have and determine for yourself whether or not the performance is sufficient for your demands. What works for you may not work for somebody else and visa versa.
Thank you! Unfortunately I have the NZXT 510 Elite case which only has to two front RGB fans connected to radiator (push config), the back, & too exhaust fans. I would’ve gone bigger on the AIO radiator if I could but the case only allows max 280. I have to check if the noctua would have enough clearance but I’ve heard really good things about them. I’m going to see how it works and hope for the best. Appreciate the recommendations & information!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
My recommendation then, would be to put two of these on your radiator and take the stock fans off. You won't be getting any RGB bling out of them like some fans, but there are really no other fans on the market that can do what these fans do and still maintain a decibel sound level that is even remotely tolerable. This would be the very best way, IMO, to take the cooler you have already and increase it's performance in order to try and avoid needing a different case or cooler.

Put two of these on there.

https://www.amazon.com/Noctua-NF-A14-iPPC-2000-PWM-Cooling/dp/B00KFCRMSG


Or even the 3000rpm variety, but then you're getting into an area where there will be a MUCH higher noise level, but it will still be significantly lower than any other fan out there with this kind of CFM and static pressure.

https://www.amazon.com/Noctua-Bearing-NF-A14-iPPC-3000-PWM/dp/B00KFCRF1A



Specs: https://noctua.at/en/products/fan


Those 3000 RPM fans have a whopping 10.5mm H20 static pressure, about five times that of the fans your cooler came with, and about 158CFM, which is about 60CFM higher per fan that the Aer P140's that come on the X62. A good option if you can stand the noise level or if you want to use a custom curve to tailor it so that it doesn't have much noise except when it's really needed. Personally, I think the 2000rpm model is more suitable, but they don't have the full capability of the 3000rpm fans.

That would be the easy solution. It would work, help, to some degree. Again, try what you have first, maybe you don't need to do anything at all.
 

jerusalem

Distinguished
Mar 19, 2010
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Preference between a Noctua (if you want dual fan mode need to check RAM Clearance) or closed-loop liquid they are pretty comparable in most testing. the i9-9900k is HOT and a lot of that issue comes from the IHS (Integrated Heat Spreader) the theory behind why practical testing leads big air and liquid to be about the same in terms of temps and often-times a high-end air cooler like the noctua nhd15 actually runs a bit quieter than the fans on the AIO liquid coolers. I have a noctua nhd15 chromax black on an i7-9700k (9900k too hot for my liking with not enough practical performance gain) and I literally had to open my case and make sure it was spinning because I didn't believe my mobo - its that quiet. So I don't really understand the noise debate. The 9700k and 9900k are supposed to have soldered IHS at least.
 

jerusalem

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Mar 19, 2010
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CHECK OUT CHROMAX BLACK NOCTUA
If you go Noctua make sure you check out the NEW chromax black for $10 more it looks sick. I didn't find out about them til after I received my standard chrome/taupe/brown one and I literally returned it and ordered the chromax on amazon (I got a linus tech tips limited edition too, it just comes with some orange vibration pads - didn't use them). At first I was thinking no way I can return it just for cosmetics but then I saw an RMA sticker on the box of the standard cooler (not sure if it was a mistake or an amazon thing or what) and I was like welp... returning but it was mostly cuz I'm a EDIT nerd for the all black.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, it has long been known that there is no comparison between the sound levels for Noctua fans versus pretty much all competition. They are just better fans. Even the closest competition from brands like Corsair, Scythe, Thermalright (NOT Thermaltake), Noiseblocker and others just aren't on the same level. Most companies take six months to develop and release a fan model. Noctua takes two years, or sometimes longer, to make sure they are without compromise.

Yes, the Chromax black versions of fans and heatsinks have been a long needed addition to the earth tones (baby poop?) colors they've had forever, or the "meh" gray redux models, but using vinyl dye on their fans has been around a long time too, so it wasn't really that big of a deal for anybody with an ounce of modder in them. :)

Yes, even the big air coolers are generally less noisy than any of the AIO coolers, when you factor in the idea the the closed loop coolers have both fan AND pump noise.
 
Nov 19, 2019
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It will work, but it's not going to give you any breathing room at all. You are going to be toeing the line in terms of thermal compliance, even at the stock configuration. Overclocking will be out of the question. You would be a lot better off with a 360/420mm AIO or a 280mm or higher custom loop. One of the very big twin finstack air coolers would likely be sufficient as well.

For air cooling, this would be the optimal solution, for anybody desiring to go that way.


Or, in lieu of that, recommendations could include the NH-D15, D15 WITH Noctua iPPC industrial 2000rpm fans, Thermalright Silver arrow ibe extreme, Phanteks PH-TC14PE or Cryorig R1.

Otherwise, I'd recommend one of the larger AIO coolers AND plan to use a case with sufficient additional fan locations to allow for a good amount of case airflow to be implemented as CPU core temps won't be the only consideration. These CPUs are going to put the VRMs on most motherboards to the full test for sure.

I would probably not buy anything right now. Use what you have and determine for yourself whether or not the performance is sufficient for your demands. What works for you may not work for somebody else and visa versa.
Hi, I'm in the same situation and really need your advice. I have a 9900ks and I figured the x62 with a push-pull config 4x Noctua iPPC industrial 2000rpm fans (two on each side of the radiator) would be superior to an x72 with 120mm fan push-pull because of the smaller less efficient fans. I was also planning on using 3 high airflow noctuas on the top and rear of my case for exhaust. Is this a good idea or should I switch to some other AIO or an air cooler like the Noctua NH-D15?
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
The Nzxt X62 has a higher ceiling than the NH-D15 by a good margin. It's a 350w AIO, the NH-D15 being a 250w+ cooler.

From my own experience with an X61 and the Cryorig R1 Ultimate which is current cooling my i7-3770K, there isn't a comparison. I went from 4.9GHz 1.32v 70°C Prime95 55°C down to 4.6GHz 1.216v just to maintain the same temps. That's a 200w+ OC down to @ 150w OC on that giant tower.

And the 9900ks is an all core turbo 4.9GHz cpu that's pushing over 200w, right at 250w at 5.0GHz.

280mm AIO minimum (300w+ capacity) 360mm (350w+) would be better, full custom loop best as it'll add 50w or more to any AIO rad size. Some 480mm rads reaching 600w capacity.

The big air coolers can handle the 9900k when pushed, barely, the NH-D15/S being better audibly than the others, but the 9900ks is a different beast being full core turbo in stock configuration vrs the single core boost of the 9900k.
 
Reactions: SgtScream
Nov 19, 2019
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The Nzxt X62 has a higher ceiling than the NH-D15 by a good margin. It's a 350w AIO, the NH-D15 being a 250w+ cooler.

From my own experience with an X61 and the Cryorig R1 Ultimate which is current cooling my i7-3770K, there isn't a comparison. I went from 4.9GHz 1.32v 70°C Prime95 55°C down to 4.6GHz 1.216v just to maintain the same temps. That's a 200w+ OC down to @ 150w OC on that giant tower.

And the 9900ks is an all core turbo 4.9GHz cpu that's pushing over 200w, right at 250w at 5.0GHz.

280mm AIO minimum (300w+ capacity) 360mm (350w+) would be better, full custom loop best as it'll add 50w or more to any AIO rad size. Some 480mm rads reaching 600w capacity.

The big air coolers can handle the 9900k when pushed, barely, the NH-D15/S being better audibly than the others, but the 9900ks is a different beast being full core turbo in stock configuration vrs the single core boost of the 9900k.
Sorry if I misread but it looks like you're recommending AIO over air for the 9900ks. If I'm not doing a custom loop I should do an x72 (360mm rad) with 3x120mm fans instead of an x62 (280mm rad) with 2x140mm fans? GamersNexus claims there's no measurable difference between the two so I assumed improving the fans on the the x62 was the best move. Does fan size not come into play here? I'm getting this info here . Thanks for your help here.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
When it comes to cpu coolers there's only 2 areas of any concern, the rest is cosmetic. That being capacity and efficiency. Most ppl gloss over the first and rely on the second as gospel.

For instance. The Cryorig R1 has the same 250w+ rating as the NH-D15. Compare the 2 results and the Noctua comes out ahead by 1°C over the Ultimate and 3°C over the Universal R1. So ppl say the Noctua is better. Not really, it's just slightly better tuned, the Noctua fans are better tuned to the heatsinks exact needs, because Noctua put more effort into that area, resulting in better efficiency, which translates into lower temps.

Same capacity. And temps aren't far enough apart, the D15 and Ultimate being the same thing, the D15S and Universal the same, the Noctua being somewhat quieter.

That's efficiency. Not capacity. If 70° is reached at 250w, at 125w its going to be @ 50°, with a smaller capacity cooler like the 140w hyper212, 70 at 140w, at 125w it'll be 60°. A measure of capacity vrs efficiency.

And that's where many reviews fail. They stick a 6700k or 7700k at a 4.6GHz OC for a grand total of 150w and try and measure temps. So with efficiency kinda the same, capacity moot that 70° at 350w vrs 300w, you end up with a 2°C difference. No big deal, don't pay extra for a bigger cooler, not needed as it runs about the same temps anyways.

Slap a 250w load on a 300w cooler, you'll be seeing 80°ish when pushed. 50w is not much headroom. Even less on aircoolers that are barely rated over the wattage output of the cpu. The 360mm aios have @ 100w of headroom, same output is lower on the curve, lower temps.

And the line isn't linear, not a direct line from minimum to maximum capacity. It's a definite curve, where below @ 70% loads is a relatively slow curve, and above @ 70% rises sharply, enough so that the last 30% of ability or so only raises performance @ 5%ish.

But that's when pushed to limits. That's a Prime95 small fft 100% load on 16 threads. Got nothing to do with the temps you'll get out of one of the most efficient coolers around, the NH-D15 when you are gaming, running 8 threads that aren't at 100% loads and the cpu is barely hitting 90w. That's where the 280mm and 360mm run equitable temps, beaten by a decent margin by the Noctua's effectiveness.

Run a good, full turbo, full core, full thread render for an hour, totally different story altogether.

Well under its ability the D15 can't be touched, it's just that good, it's just that not even it can match the capacity of either of the AIO's, so under higher usage, has worsening efficiency and eventually gets beaten.
 
Nov 19, 2019
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My specs:
  • i9-9900KS v1.35
  • x72 Kraken
  • NZXT h710i
  • Grizzly Kryonaut
CPU temps are around 50 when idle and around 65-70 in stress. The case is also very hot.
I'm disappointed. Next time I would prefer some full tower one with Dark Pro or Noctua...

I have almost the exact same specs (h710 instead of h710i) and I’m getting 29° cpu after doing push pull on the rad with 120mm noctua industrial fans and removing the front panel. It’s also pretty quiet after plotting custom fan curves in bios. I wouldn’t use the nzxt smart device if you’re hooked up to that. Set the kraken to perfomance too. I didnt connect any fans to the kraken and chose to instead connect them to the pwm fan headers on my mobo. In bios I set fans to run off cpu temperature.
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
@Nickon , if you want to discuss your own system, start your own thread. Somebody else's thread is not the place for discussion of your own configuration or problems. If it's relevant and is helpful to the OP, that's one thing. Those last four comments had nothing at all to do with the OP's questions so let's leave off that kind thread hijacking in the future. Thanks.

Unrelated posts deleted.
 
Reactions: Nickon
Nov 5, 2019
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A few days ago I finally assembled my pc.
  • MSI MEG Z390 ACE
  • Intel Core i9-9900KS
  • NZXT Kraken X62 (stock, maximum performance)
  • NZXT H710
  • ARCTIC Cooling MX-4
In normal use, game + stream loads CPU by 60-98% (irregularly), while the maximum temperature is 79 degrees, and the constant is 68-74 degrees.
I have not made any settings in bios yet, lack of time and experience ...
 

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