[SOLVED] Will raising my EDC give more performance?

Jason H.

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Oct 20, 2013
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Hey guys in Ryzen Master my EDC says 99% of 90a under load. Which is fine but it also says that the LIMIT is 168a...

Also it shows in RM that my EDC setting is set to 90.

In my BIOS I can manually raise or lower this setting (EDC).

IF I do so, what are the pros and cons? Will anything bad happen? Is the 90 a limit of the MOBO and the 168 is the limit of the CPU? If I raise the EDC Past 90 what will happen?

PLEASE Shine some light on this for me because I feel raising it will give me better performance but I dont want to fry anything lol.

THANKS!

EDIT: Just by the way. I dont have any OC enabled, but I do have Precision Boost Overdrive Enabled in the BIOS along with a MEMORY OC of 3200mhz at 16-18-18-36 if any of this matters. However PBO is Greyed Out inside of Ryzen Master and when I hover over it it says future feature in development? So IDEK if PBO is actually enabled but BIOS says it is.

UPDATE: PBO is trash. Disabled it and enabled game mode in my bios so Im now running at 3.85ghz on all cores. (game mode enables a 450mhz OC automatically, but it works stable, but 3.9ghz manual oc is not stable......)

MOBO: MSI Tomahawk B450
CPU: Ryzen 5 2600
Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper T2
GPU: Gigabyte RTX 2060 Super OC 3x Windforce White (8pin only version)
MEMORY: HyperX RGB 2x8gb DDR4 3000mhz
Storage: Samsung 860 Evo 250gb / 500gb Seagate / 1tb Samsung 860 Qvo
PSU: Corsair cx550m
WIN: Windows 10 Pro
Case Cooling: Antec Prizm 3x 120mm rgb case fans with controller and 2 RGB strips / 1 default 120mm case fan
 
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But the basis of my question is why is it saying 100% at 90a, but then it says MAX LIMIT is 168a? ...
It's telling you the percent of default max value (90a) peculiar to your processor. The 168a limit is (supposedly) defined by the motherboard's VRM capability. But since almost no motherboard mfr populates that correctly in BIOS everyone reads the same.

Package Power Tracking (“PPT”): The PPT threshold is the allowed socket power consumption permitted across the voltage rails supplying the socket. Applications with high thread counts, and/or “heavy” threads, can encounter PPT limits that can be alleviated with a raised PPT limit.

Default for Socket AM4 is at least 142W on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for Socket AM4 is at least 88W on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.

Thermal Design Current (“TDC”): The maximum current (amps) that can be delivered by a specific motherboard’s voltage regulator configuration in thermally-constrained scenarios.

Default for socket AM4 is at least 95A on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for socket AM4 is at least 60A on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.

Electrical Design Current (“EDC”): The maximum current (amps) that can be delivered by a specific motherboard’s voltage regulator configuration in a peak (“spike”) condition for a short period of time.

Default for socket AM4 is 140A on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for socket AM4 is 90A on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.
 
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Newtonius

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I wouldn't mess with it if you're running a B450 board. It stands for Electrical Design Current and it's responsible for the maximum amount of current at any instantaneous short period of time that can be delivered by the motherboard’s voltage regulators.

You should change windows performance mode to 'performance' before touching the EDC settings, don't use ryzen master to adjust performance settings - it's not precise. Also you shouldn't adjust this unless you know the temps of your VRMs beforehand because if you overheat your VRMs you could damage your system or at the least cause random shutdowns.

But to answer your initial question, it could boost performance but not by much, you'd get more performance OC'ing your core clocks over EDC. It's safer and easier.
 
With a B450 Tomahawk, just slide EDC, TDC and PPT to the max. It's quite capable enough for even a 2700X so your 2600 will be fine.

But also lower Vcore with offsets (only using offset voltage adjustment) to undervolt as far as it will go staying stable. That keeps the CPU cool; with good thermals the boosting algorithm keeps it boosted longer. Since thermals will limit the boosting, it also depends a lot on CPU cooling and unfortunately your Hyper T2 probably isn't that much better than the stock cooler.

Here's Buildzoid dialing in a PBO overclock on an MSI board/BIOS. His board is different, but the process should work very similarly on yours. Don't expect to hit the same clocks, he's using a 2700X and your 2600 just won't hit as high.
 
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Jason H.

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Oct 20, 2013
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With a B450 Tomahawk, just slide EDC, TDC and PPT to the max. It's quite capable enough for even a 2700X so your 2600 will be fine.

But also lower Vcore with offsets (only using offset voltage adjustment) to undervolt as far as it will go staying stable. That keeps the CPU cool; with good thermals the boosting algorithm keeps it boosted longer. Since thermals will limit the boosting, it also depends a lot on CPU cooling and unfortunately your Hyper T2 probably isn't that much better than the stock cooler.

Here's Buildzoid dialing in a PBO overclock on an MSI board/BIOS. His board is different, but the process should work very similarly on yours. Don't expect to hit the same clocks, he's using a 2700X and your 2600 just won't hit as high.
There is no slider I have to manually input the number. And I cannot change the EDC in Ryzen Master, only in the BIOS. It does not let me change it in RM. Also I had an OC enabled in the BIOS of 4.0ghz at 1.35v HOWEVER Ryzen Master has a bug where if theres a OC enabled in bios, and not through RM, then it wont show any of the readings besides temp and speed. SO I disabled the OC in bios and enabled PBO so I could see what my readings were on EDC, TDC, and PPT.

But the basis of my question is why is it saying 100% at 90a, but then it says MAX LIMIT is 168a? Like why would it be harmful, or not harmful, to have the EDC set at the 168a limit instead of the 90a limit? AND WHERE DOES THIS 90a LIMIT COME FROM?

Like basically, if it says max limit is 168a, how is it at 100% at 90a? is 90a the limitation of the board or the cpu? Or just a random limit that is set?
 

Jason H.

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Oct 20, 2013
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But to answer your initial question, it could boost performance but not by much, you'd get more performance OC'ing your core clocks over EDC. It's safer and easier.
I wasnt using RM to OC. RM has a bug where if a BIOS oc is enabled, then RM wont show any of the EDC. PPT or TDC readings and only show readings for temp and speed.

So I disabled the OC in bios so I was able to see the readings as I am trying to figure out, simply WHY and HOW the EDC says its max limit is 168a, but the edc is at 100% of 90a. How can it be 100% at 90a if the limit is 168a? Im trying to figure out where the 90a limit comes from and why its implemented. And I felt being able to raise it would allow me to stabilize my OC or even a higher OC.
 

Newtonius

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I wasnt using RM to OC. RM has a bug where if a BIOS oc is enabled, then RM wont show any of the EDC. PPT or TDC readings and only show readings for temp and speed.

So I disabled the OC in bios so I was able to see the readings as I am trying to figure out, simply WHY and HOW the EDC says its max limit is 168a, but the edc is at 100% of 90a. How can it be 100% at 90a if the limit is 168a? Im trying to figure out where the 90a limit comes from and why its implemented. And I felt being able to raise it would allow me to stabilize my OC or even a higher OC.
Try this then

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eooTin5GMN4


But you will still notice there will be no boost in your performance overall. OC is mostly stable when it comes to the temp rather than EDC.
 
...
But the basis of my question is why is it saying 100% at 90a, but then it says MAX LIMIT is 168a? ...
It's telling you the percent of default max value (90a) peculiar to your processor. The 168a limit is (supposedly) defined by the motherboard's VRM capability. But since almost no motherboard mfr populates that correctly in BIOS everyone reads the same.

Package Power Tracking (“PPT”): The PPT threshold is the allowed socket power consumption permitted across the voltage rails supplying the socket. Applications with high thread counts, and/or “heavy” threads, can encounter PPT limits that can be alleviated with a raised PPT limit.

Default for Socket AM4 is at least 142W on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for Socket AM4 is at least 88W on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.

Thermal Design Current (“TDC”): The maximum current (amps) that can be delivered by a specific motherboard’s voltage regulator configuration in thermally-constrained scenarios.

Default for socket AM4 is at least 95A on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for socket AM4 is at least 60A on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.

Electrical Design Current (“EDC”): The maximum current (amps) that can be delivered by a specific motherboard’s voltage regulator configuration in a peak (“spike”) condition for a short period of time.

Default for socket AM4 is 140A on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for socket AM4 is 90A on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.
 
Reactions: Jason H.

Jason H.

Honorable
Oct 20, 2013
1,259
61
11,440
51
It's telling you the percent of default max value (90a) peculiar to your processor. The 168a limit is (supposedly) defined by the motherboard's VRM capability. But since almost no motherboard mfr populates that correctly in BIOS everyone reads the same.

Package Power Tracking (“PPT”): The PPT threshold is the allowed socket power consumption permitted across the voltage rails supplying the socket. Applications with high thread counts, and/or “heavy” threads, can encounter PPT limits that can be alleviated with a raised PPT limit.

Default for Socket AM4 is at least 142W on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for Socket AM4 is at least 88W on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.

Thermal Design Current (“TDC”): The maximum current (amps) that can be delivered by a specific motherboard’s voltage regulator configuration in thermally-constrained scenarios.

Default for socket AM4 is at least 95A on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for socket AM4 is at least 60A on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.

Electrical Design Current (“EDC”): The maximum current (amps) that can be delivered by a specific motherboard’s voltage regulator configuration in a peak (“spike”) condition for a short period of time.

Default for socket AM4 is 140A on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for socket AM4 is 90A on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.
It's telling you the percent of default max value (90a) peculiar to your processor. The 168a limit is (supposedly) defined by the motherboard's VRM capability. But since almost no motherboard mfr populates that correctly in BIOS everyone reads the same.

Package Power Tracking (“PPT”): The PPT threshold is the allowed socket power consumption permitted across the voltage rails supplying the socket. Applications with high thread counts, and/or “heavy” threads, can encounter PPT limits that can be alleviated with a raised PPT limit.

Default for Socket AM4 is at least 142W on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for Socket AM4 is at least 88W on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.

Thermal Design Current (“TDC”): The maximum current (amps) that can be delivered by a specific motherboard’s voltage regulator configuration in thermally-constrained scenarios.

Default for socket AM4 is at least 95A on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for socket AM4 is at least 60A on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.

Electrical Design Current (“EDC”): The maximum current (amps) that can be delivered by a specific motherboard’s voltage regulator configuration in a peak (“spike”) condition for a short period of time.

Default for socket AM4 is 140A on motherboards rated for 105W TDP processors.
Default for socket AM4 is 90A on motherboards rated for 65W TDP processors.
TY! See thats what I wanted to know, was wether the CPU or the MOBO creates the 90a limit and which one has the 168a limit.

So in your opinion, would I be safe to raise the EDC? or is there even any need?

However Im having a strange issue. When I manually OC my cpu to 3.9ghz on all cores, sometimes my pc does not start properly and I have to reset CMOS and all that jazz and on my MOBO a red light comes on next to "CPU". SO Im assuming the manual OC is the problem for that. HOWEVER, my max boost clock for this cpu is 3.9 so I figured 3.9 would not be an issue. (but I also heard 3.9ghz is only for single cores and not all cores so maybe thats it?)

As of now Im using my mobos "Game Mode'" feature where it automatically overclocks my CPU by like 450mhz. So instead of PBO or Core Boost it just sets all cores to 3.85 (default is 3.4). And that has NEVER had an issue but as soon as I manually set it to 3.9ghz or higher, no matter the voltage (all the way up to 1.45 which i know is not safe long term, and up to 1.2v on the NB). Like the system will be stable for days and then I go to take the pc out of sleep mode, or turn it on, and everything powers up but no output and that red CPU light on my mobo comes on.

So im not really sure why I cant even get this CPU to work stable at even just 3.9ghz but IDK much about OC'ing CPU's (just now learning) so when I seen the 90a limit and it say I can go up to 168a, in my head I figured that 90a limit was bottlenecking my possible performance.
 

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