[SOLVED] Will SSD that already had Windows 10 on it result in conflict with another SSD that also has windows 10 after upgrade?

Nov 1, 2019
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Hi, I know the question sounds a bit weird from the title but let me explain: I have ordered a new laptop for myself and it comes prepackaged with a 128 gb nvme ssd and a crappy 5400 rpm sata hdd that I want to replace with a sata ssd. The problem is, the sata ssd is from my old laptop and already has a copy of windows on it, so my question is: will I be able to put in the new ssd, boot into windows from the nvme drive and fully format the ssd including any boot partitions? I think one time I tried this and it worked, but then I got an irremovable message saying "which copy of windows would you like to boot into" every time I booted up the PC even though one of the drives which presumably had one of the windows installations didn't have windows anymore (I'm guessing due to the old windows partitions being left on it). So, will I be able to do the upgrade process without said issue occuring in the laptop?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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Hi, I know the question sounds a bit weird from the title but let me explain: I have ordered a new laptop for myself and it comes prepackaged with a 128 gb nvme ssd and a crappy 5400 rpm sata hdd that I want to replace with a sata ssd. The problem is, the sata ssd is from my old laptop and already has a copy of windows on it, so my question is: will I be able to put in the new ssd, boot into windows from the nvme drive and fully format the ssd including any boot partitions? I think one time I tried this and it worked, but then I got an irremovable message saying "which copy of windows would you like to boot into" every time I booted up the PC even though one of the drives which presumably had one of the windows installations didn't have windows anymore (I'm guessing due to the old windows partitions being left on it). So, will I be able to do the upgrade process without said issue occuring in the laptop?
Yes, you can fully wipe the old drive.
In the BIOS, the included drive should be first in the boot order.
If the system is booting from the included drive, what exists on the old drive is of no consequence. "Windows" be on it is just a bunch of files.

Commandline, diskpart, and its clean command will absolutely wipe everything from that old drive.
Be completely sure of which drive you're working with on that.
 
Reactions: potato112
Nov 1, 2019
10
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10
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Hello,
You could manually remove the SATA SSD as a boot option from bios.
Will this (in the case that the "which volume of windows would you like to boot into" does occur) remove that message? And will all BIOSes have it? I'm asking since things like laptops or prebuilt desktops usually have a locked down bios
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
129,087
5,153
165,040
20,007
Hi, I know the question sounds a bit weird from the title but let me explain: I have ordered a new laptop for myself and it comes prepackaged with a 128 gb nvme ssd and a crappy 5400 rpm sata hdd that I want to replace with a sata ssd. The problem is, the sata ssd is from my old laptop and already has a copy of windows on it, so my question is: will I be able to put in the new ssd, boot into windows from the nvme drive and fully format the ssd including any boot partitions? I think one time I tried this and it worked, but then I got an irremovable message saying "which copy of windows would you like to boot into" every time I booted up the PC even though one of the drives which presumably had one of the windows installations didn't have windows anymore (I'm guessing due to the old windows partitions being left on it). So, will I be able to do the upgrade process without said issue occuring in the laptop?
Yes, you can fully wipe the old drive.
In the BIOS, the included drive should be first in the boot order.
If the system is booting from the included drive, what exists on the old drive is of no consequence. "Windows" be on it is just a bunch of files.

Commandline, diskpart, and its clean command will absolutely wipe everything from that old drive.
Be completely sure of which drive you're working with on that.
 
Reactions: potato112
May 2, 2020
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No, there will be no problem. In the BIOS you can choose from which SSD you'd like to boot. When you've chosen, delete Win10 on the SSD you wont be booting Win10 from for extra storage.
 
Reactions: potato112

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