Discussion Will there ever be a future that dead and sub pixels will never show up in screen displays?

WrongRookie

Great
Oct 23, 2020
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Ok...I'll be blunt here. I'm disappointed that screen technology hasn't really evolved that much when it comes to defects like dead or stuck pixels. I just have one on my monitor and while its easy to say "live with it or get a new one" it's also easy to say "I've spent a lot of money on the display and you shouldn't get defects like that at all". Like sure, dead pixels can show up at some point in the monitor's life but we really shouldn't have these defects on screens at all since they affect the display of things in the long run.

Sure, OLED, QLED and monitors with more hertz is cool but damn them dead pixels can ruin all of that joy to a large extent.
 
Well, dead/stuck pixels are covered by warrenty.
And I've never had one show up, only when it's new and those are VERY VERY rare today, unless you buy a really cheap thing.

But aside from that, the pixels on 4k tvs and monitors, and especially 8k ones are now so small, if there's only 1 dead pixel, even a red pixel on a white background is hard to see.


Everything has defects.
Monitors do too. That won't change unless we make a display that doesn't have pixels.
 

JWNoctis

Upstanding
Jun 9, 2021
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I don't think I've ever noticed (or found) a single dead or stuck pixel in any LCD or OLED display on any device I've used with any regularity over the last two decade. Closest thing might be OLED degradation and burn-in, on one or two of them.

It might be a matter of expectation.
 
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JWNoctis

Upstanding
Jun 9, 2021
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And why exactly is it so hard to make a display that isn't based on pixels?
Technically, CRT had none of those problems, had way better colour than early LCD displays, and some aficionados still swear by them. Unfortunately nobody produced them for PC use anymore, and the largest common CRT monitor was 17" in 4:3.

As mentioned by @siaan312 earlier, individual pixel faults are hard to notice on a display with sufficiently high resolution like the Apple Retina. And more quality-conscious manufacturers do test and bin their panels.
 
TN panels are cheap.
VA = mid-range quality.
IPS are good, but pretty expensive.
OLED are technically the best, but they are very expensive.
This is not 100% correct.
It's at best a general guide, but is in no means 100% correct.
TN panels are usually cheaper, and in the past used to have unuseable viewing angles, and colors that didn't even resemble themselves. nowadays, a good TN panel can have useable vertical viewing angles, and pretty good horizontal ones, and while not enough for color accurate work, the colors on a good/calibrated TN panel are enough to not be noticiably bad, but the upside of these TN panels, is their very fast response times, making old 240hz monitors be exclusive to TN since on an IPS of say, 6 years ago look like a smeary mess as 240hz, if it even hit that.
VA panels are not worse than IPS, and aren't cheaper in most cases. They are different.
VA is made by samsung, while IPS displays are made by a lot of companies, though the best ones usually come from LG.
VA has pretty good viewing angles but not as good as IPS, and usually have great colors, sometimes even better than IPS. Their 1 major pitfall is their response times, which is usually quite bad, though recently with the Odyssey g7 and g9, they became much better, and 240hz actually looks pretty decent with no major smearing.

IPS panels have the best viewing angles, and good color, though their response times are just or even worse than VA, and 240hz on them is still in it's infancy (They are like, 3 IPS 240hz monitors, and none have very good response times without tricks like backlight strobing).

OLEDs are not the best. They are the most expensive, yes, but they have a very large list of both pros and cons, all of which are major:
Pros:
Amazing color, The best contrast (since black is actually the pixels turning off, unlike a traditional LCD that has a backlight, making black look gray), and even see-through displays, foldable displays and more are all available due to oled.
Cons:
Expensive, Low brightness, and of course, burn in.
 
So displays under TN panels are considered cheap?



And why exactly is it so hard to make a display that isn't based on pixels?
We just don't have that kind of tech to make a pixel less display...
Like, LCDs are usually a backlight of some sort, usually LED nowadays, that have special liquid crystals that when certain voltage is applied to them expand or contract to block or allow more or less, and which wavelength (color) of light to send.
(Displays are MUCH more complex than that, that's just a 1 line way to describe it)
OLEDs use organic films to emit light, making it possible to turn on a single pixel, without the entire display like an LCD, though this is still pixel based.

The current leap in technology is MicroLED, which is currently in it's infancy and only available on a few 10 thousand/100 thousand dollars TVs like samsung's "The Wall"
It's basically the easiest one to imagine.
You have a grid of super small leds.
for a 4k tv you have a grid of 8,294,400 super small leds. (3840x2160)
It's just very hard to make such small leds and put them in such a big grid.
But even this, is pixel based.

There's currently not a display on the market, or from my knowledge, in the works, that does not rely on some sort of pixel grid, whether it be crystals, organisms, or small leds.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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TN/VA/IPS - irrelevant!

NONE of those are immune to a dead pixel.

And for actual quality to your eye, the leters behing the model number is also irrelevant.
Same TN panels are better than some IPS panels. Both in viewing angle and color rendition.
 

Endre

Respectable
Apr 30, 2019
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This is not 100% correct.
It's at best a general guide, but is in no means 100% correct.
TN panels are usually cheaper, and in the past used to have unuseable viewing angles, and colors that didn't even resemble themselves. nowadays, a good TN panel can have useable vertical viewing angles, and pretty good horizontal ones, and while not enough for color accurate work, the colors on a good/calibrated TN panel are enough to not be noticiably bad, but the upside of these TN panels, is their very fast response times, making old 240hz monitors be exclusive to TN since on an IPS of say, 6 years ago look like a smeary mess as 240hz, if it even hit that.
VA panels are not worse than IPS, and aren't cheaper in most cases. They are different.
VA is made by samsung, while IPS displays are made by a lot of companies, though the best ones usually come from LG.
VA has pretty good viewing angles but not as good as IPS, and usually have great colors, sometimes even better than IPS. Their 1 major pitfall is their response times, which is usually quite bad, though recently with the Odyssey g7 and g9, they became much better, and 240hz actually looks pretty decent with no major smearing.

IPS panels have the best viewing angles, and good color, though their response times are just or even worse than VA, and 240hz on them is still in it's infancy (They are like, 3 IPS 240hz monitors, and none have very good response times without tricks like backlight strobing).

OLEDs are not the best. They are the most expensive, yes, but they have a very large list of both pros and cons, all of which are major:
Pros:
Amazing color, The best contrast (since black is actually the pixels turning off, unlike a traditional LCD that has a backlight, making black look gray), and even see-through displays, foldable displays and more are all available due to oled.
Cons:
Expensive, Low brightness, and of course, burn in.
There’s a huge debate on the internet over which technology is better: VA or IPS.
Both technologies improved lately.
Still, IPS remained the more expensive technology of the two.

•IPS: Better color reproduction & viewing angles.

•VA: Better contrast.
Response time is no longer a win for VA because now you can buy 360Hz 1ms IPS panels.

•OLED has the fastest response time, the best contrast, and the best colors.
Which makes it the best panel technology for as long as it lasts before burn-in wrecks it.
But they found tricks (like moving around still images on the screen) to prevent burn-in.

•MicroLED technology is in the works and promises to deliver OLED quality without the burn-in issue, and with higher brightness levels (HDR1000).
 
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