Question Will these components fit in my laptop?

thugxcaliber

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Feb 9, 2012
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I recently purchased an ASUS TUF FX505DT Gaming laptop, 15.6" 120hz FULL HD, AMD Ryzen 5 R5-3550H Processor, Gefore GTX 1650, 8GB DDR4, 256GB PICe SSD
(https://www.amazon.com/R5-3550H-Processor-Graphics-FX505DT-AH51-Keyboard/dp/B07VBK4SYS/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=asus+505dt&qid=1582521582&s=electronics&sr=1-1)


I was hoping to upgrade it to boost its ability in the near future. I was looking to purchase the following components but cannot tell if these components are compatible and will fit into my system? Could anyone more knowledgeable regarding components help me verify that both of these components will both fit and work with my rig?


HyperX HX424S14IB2/8 Impact Black 8GB 2400MHz DDR4 Non-ECC CL14 260-pin Unbuffered SODIMM Internal Memory Black
(https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B071L1VBDN/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=ANNSJU9W28Y9J&psc=1)

And

SanDisk SSD PLUS 1TB Internal SSD - SATA III 6 Gb/s, 2.5"/7mm - SDSSDA-1T00-G26
(https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07D998212/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1)

Thank you in advance. Any help is appreciated.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Assuming you intend to replace the internal HDD with an SSD, then yes, those should work. There are a few caveats though.

Concerning the memory, it would be advisable to remove the currently installed memory module and note the model number, and then try to obtain an identical part number memory module in order to give yourself the highest chance of compatibility. There are still no guarantees, because even identical memory that didn't come together in the same kit sometimes will not play nice with each other, but it will give you the best chance outside of simply ordering a full kit with two matched DIMMs that come together from the factory, having been already tested for compatibility.

As far as the SSD is concerned, that laptop already comes with an M.2 PCIe solid state drive, presumably with Windows installed on it. That will be much faster than any SATA SSD, so I assume you intend to use the SATA SSD in place of the HDD for a secondary drive to store games or personal files, not for the OS. So long as that is the case, then you should be fine but I wouldn't recommend purchasing that drive if you intend to use it for your OS drive. If you do, then you will want to look at 1TB M.2 PCIe SSDs and you'll want to make sure they are the same form factor as what your drive takes as there are several different sizes of M.2 SSD out there. And by size, I mean the physical size of the drives actual footprint, as it mounts into the M.2 slot and retainer.
 

thugxcaliber

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Feb 9, 2012
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Assuming you intend to replace the internal HDD with an SSD, then yes, those should work. There are a few caveats though.

Concerning the memory, it would be advisable to remove the currently installed memory module and note the model number, and then try to obtain an identical part number memory module in order to give yourself the highest chance of compatibility. There are still no guarantees, because even identical memory that didn't come together in the same kit sometimes will not play nice with each other, but it will give you the best chance outside of simply ordering a full kit with two matched DIMMs that come together from the factory, having been already tested for compatibility.

As far as the SSD is concerned, that laptop already comes with an M.2 PCIe solid state drive, presumably with Windows installed on it. That will be much faster than any SATA SSD, so I assume you intend to use the SATA SSD in place of the HDD for a secondary drive to store games or personal files, not for the OS. So long as that is the case, then you should be fine but I wouldn't recommend purchasing that drive if you intend to use it for your OS drive. If you do, then you will want to look at 1TB M.2 PCIe SSDs and you'll want to make sure they are the same form factor as what your drive takes as there are several different sizes of M.2 SSD out there. And by size, I mean the physical size of the drives actual footprint, as it mounts into the M.2 slot and retainer.
Cool. Thanks for that. You are correct. I am simply planning on upping the available memory storage for my personal files and whatnot and leaving the OS on the M2 drive. I was just trying to make sure it physically fit before spending the money only to find out it doesn't. I know that there is no GUARANTEE that you could give that it will fit but based on the general design of components there is no reason that it is overtly obvious it wont.

In regards to the RAM thanks for that. I was actually wondering about that myself. So no matter what I decide it would behoove me to get a set of 2 identical sticks and then replace both sets of RAM to ensure compatibility. So simply purchase whatever I decide to in a 2 pack (8gb x 2, 16gb x2 etc...) and then remove the OLD ram stick and install both new ones in both slots. Correct?

Thanks again.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, on the RAM. That is the BEST way, although not the cheapest. If you have to go the cheap route, try to find a matching model number DIMM. But again, as you have understood, that brings a certain amount of risk that it may not work properly. Getting matched DIMMs is the only way to guarantee that they are compatible with each other.

It would also be wise to TRY and stick as closely as possible to a kit with the same speed, timings and voltage, and of course ensure that they are a compatible SODIMM for use in a laptop since they use a different type of memory from desktop systems. If you can find verification somewhere that a faster DIMM has been used successfully in that same model of laptop, then a faster memory kit won't hurt, but make sure to verify because laptop BIOSes are generally pretty limited compared to desktop motherboards and there will likely not be a lot of options for configuring compatibility with newer or faster memory.

Likely you can find a validated compatible kit using the Corsair memory finder or G.Skill memory configurator, and take much of the guesswork out.
 

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